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2012 Ballot Measure Election Results:Arizona

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November 6, 2012

Arizona

By Josh Altic

PHOENIX, Arizona: Three of the nine ballot measures that were on the Arizona 2012 ballot on November 6 were approved. Out of the remaining six, five were defeated and one is currently too close to call one way or another.

For details on each proposition, see below.

Proposition 114

This measure, a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, prohibits crime victims from being subject to a claim for damages for causing death or injury.

According to the Arizona Republic website Proposition 114 was one of the three propositions on the Arizona ballot that passed. It was approved by a very large, sixty percent margin, with 80% voting yes and 20% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 115

The measure, the second of seven legislatively-referred constitutional amendments, would increase the governor's options when picking from finalists for the state supreme court, Court of Appeals and the superior courts of Pima and Maricopa County. Currently, special screening panels review potential judges for those courts. The governor then picks a judge from at least three finalists. If enacted, this measure would increase that from 3 to 8. In addition, the State Bar of Arizona, if this measure was approved, would be allowed to appoint only one of five attorneys to a judicial nominating commission. Currently, the governor appoints five attorneys that are vetted by the bar association. Also, the measure would increase the terms of judges from six to eight years and the retirement age from 70 to 75.

Proposition 115 was defeated according to the Arizona Republic, with a large majority, 72.8%, voting no and 27.2% voting yes. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 116

This legislatively-referred constitutional amendment would give tax breaks to businesses with newly acquired equipment.

The Arizona Republic shows Proposition 116 defeated, 43.6% of voters approving the tax breaks and 56.4% opposed to them. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 117

This measure is the fourth of seven legislatively-referred constitutional amendments and limits the annual growth in the limited property value of locally assessed properties.

According to the Arizona Republic website, the limits of Proposition 117 were approved by Arizona voters. 57.1% of ballots were in favor of this amendment and 42.9% opposed to it. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 118

This Amendment, which is a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, would mandate that the annual distribution from the Permanent Fund be 2.5 percent of the average monthly market values of the fund for the immediately preceding five calendar years.

The Arizona Republic shows Proposition 118 to be a very tight race. Of votes counted, 49.8% approve Prop 118 and 50.2% reject it. As votes are still being reported and counted, this race is too close to call. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

For further updates follow Ballotpedia's article on this proposition.

Proposition 119

Proposition 119, one of the three legislatively-referred constitutional amendments that was approved, authorizes the Arizona Legislature to enact a process to exchange trust land if the exchange is related to protecting military installations and managing lands.

According to the Arizona Republic, Proposition 119 was passed with 61.9% voting yes and 38.1% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 120

This measure, the seventh legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the Arizona ballot, would have declared state sovereignty over the state's natural resources based on the argument of "equal footing." Natural resources would include land, air, water, minerals and wildlife

Proposition 120 was defeated with 32.3% voting yes and 67.7% voting no, according to the Arizona Republic. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 121

This measure is the only initiated constitutional amendment on the Arizona 2012 general election ballot and sought to implement a top-two style open primary system. In a top-two open primary, candidates for a government position run on the same primary ballot regardless of party affiliation. All registered voters are then able to cast their vote for the candidate of their choice. The two candidates with the most votes are then placed on the November general election ballot, regardless of party affiliation. The proposal was introduced by former Phoenix Mayor Paul Johnson.

According to the Arizona Republic website, Proposition 121 was shot down by 67.2% of voters with only 32.8% voting yes. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Proposition 204

This initiated state statute would have renewed a 2010 voter-approved one-cent sales tax to provide funding for education for students in the state who meet certain requirements, scholarships for college students and reinvestment in vocational education and new jobs, according to reports.

But, according to the Arizona Republic Proposition 204 was rejected, with 35.1% voting yes and 64.9% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.


Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's page for Arizona 2012 ballot measures.

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