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2012 Ballot Measure Election Results: New Mexico

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November 6, 2012

New Mexico

By Kristen Horn

SANTA FE, New Mexico: A whopping eight ballot measures were on the New Mexico 2012 statewide ballot on November 6, with most dealing with state governance.

Out of the eight measures on the ballot, six were approved and two are too close to call.

Below is a breakdown of each measure:

Bond Question A

New Mexico Bond Question A proposed to authorize bonds not exceed $10,335,000 to make capital expenditures for certain senior citizen facility improvements.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website this measure has been approved, as voters gave a resounding yes with 62% of the vote.

Bond Question B

New Mexico Bond Question B proposed to authorize bonds, not to exceed $9,830,000, in order to make capital expenditures for public library resource acquisitions.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website this measure has been approved with 62% voting yes and 37% voting no.

Bond Question C

New Mexico Bond Question C appeared on the November 6, 2012 ballot in the state to address higher education improvements.

This legislatively-referred state statute proposed to authorize bonds not exceed $120,000,000 to make capital expenditures for certain higher education improvements.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website this measure was approved with 61% of "yes" votes.

Constitutional Amendment 1

Constitutional Amendment 1, the New Mexico Judicial Standards Amendment, appeared on the ballot in New Mexico, which under this measure, the Public Regulation Commission, which investigates allegations against judges, conducts hearings, and also recommends sanctions to the New Mexico Supreme Court, would add two members by changing the New Mexico Constitution.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website this measure has been approved with 60% of the vote.

Constitutional Amendment 2

Constitutional Amendment 2, the New Mexico Public Regulation Commissioner Qualifications Amendment,proposed raise the qualifications required to be public regulation commissioner.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website this measure was approved in the general election with 80% voting yes and 19% voting no. Election results are not yet official, as a canvassing of the results will not be done until later this month.

Constitutional Amendment 3

Constitutional Amendment 3, the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Corporation Chartering Amendment, appeared on the November 6, 2012 ballot, seeking to change the responsibility by removing the task of chartering corporations from the Public Regulations Commission to the New Mexico Secretary of State.

This measure was too close to call.

Currently, 50% of voters voted "yes", while 49% voted "no." Votes are still being counted.

Constitutional Amendment 4

Constitutional Amendment 4, the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission Insurance Division Amendment proposed to remove insurance division from the Public Regulations Commission, and make it an independent entity.

According to the New Mexico’s Secretary of State’s website, this measure is also too close to call at 50% "yes" and 49% "no."

Constitutional Amendment 5

Constitutional Amendment 5, the New Mexico Public Defender Office Amendment, proposed to make the office of state public defender separate from the state government, thereby signifying that the New Mexico Governor would no longer appoint a person to the position.

This measure was approved with 61% of the vote.


Stay tuned for more developments on Ballotpedia's Ballotpedia's page for New Mexico 2012 ballot measures, as results are not yet official.


See also

Ballotpedia News

References