2014 elections review:Hawaii primary still too close to call

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August 11, 2014

By Ballotpedia's Congressional team

Hawaii

The fate of the Democratic nominee in the race for the Senate seat lies in the hands of a few thousand voters after the race was deemed too close to call. Voters in two precincts in the Puna District of Hawaii's Big Island who would normally vote in person will instead have the opportunity to cast absentee ballots after they were unable to cast ballots when two polling sites were closed because of damage caused by Tropical Storm Iselle.[1][2]

Incumbent Brian Schatz and Rep. Colleen Hanabusa were separated by fewer than 2,000 votes out of more than 230,000 ballots cast.[3]

By law, election officials have 21 days to conduct an election, but the state is still working to restore essential services following the tropical storms.[1]

U.S. Senate

See also: United States Senate special election in Hawaii, 2014

Hawaii will hold a special election for the U.S. Senate in 2014. The special election will be held to fill the vacancy left by the death of Senator Daniel Inouye (D).[4]

The results of the Democratic primary remained too close to call. Colleen Hanabusa and incumbent Brian Schatz were separated by less than one percent, or approximately 2,000 votes out of the more than 230,000 votes.[5][6]

Voters in two precincts in the Puna District of Hawaii's Big Island who would normally vote in person will instead have the opportunity to cast absentee ballots after they were unable to cast ballots when two polling sites were closed because of damage caused by Tropical Storm Iselle.[1] While election officials have 21 days to conduct an election, there is currently no timeline in place for when the winner will be determined.[1]

On December 26, 2012, Governor of Hawaii Neil Abercrombie (D) appointed his Lieutenant Governor Brian Schatz to fill the seat's vacancy.[7]

On June 17, 2013, the Hawaii Democratic Party filed a lawsuit in federal court seeking to close its primary to all except registered Democrats.[8] Currently, Hawaii does not ask voters to choose a party when they register to vote. This is the first time any state Democratic Party has ever filed a lawsuit to close an open primary.[9]

The winner of the contested Democratic primary is a favorite for the general election in the heavily Democratic state.[10] The winner of the primary will face businessman and former state Representative Cam Cavasso (R) in the general election.[6]

U.S. Senate, Hawaii Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngBrian Schatz Incumbent 49.3% 115,445
Colleen Hanabusa 48.6% 113,663
Brian Evans 2.1% 4,842
Total Votes 233,950
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections
U.S. Senate, Hawaii Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngCam Cavasso 72.3% 25,874
John Roco 12.4% 4,425
Harry Friel 9.7% 3,477
Eddie Pirkowski 5.7% 2,033
Total Votes 35,809
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections
U.S. Senate, Hawaii No Party Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Joy Allison 67.8% 388
Art Reyes 32.2% 184
Total Votes 572
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections

U.S. House

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Hawaii, 2014

There are two seats up for grabs in the Hawaii's 2014 congressional elections. The Democratic Party currently holds both seats.

Members of the U.S. House from Hawaii -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 2 2
     Republican Party 0 0
Total 2 2

District 1

See also: Hawaii's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Colleen Hanabusa (D), who was first elected in 2010. She announced her decision to run for the U.S. Senate seat on May 2, 2013.[11][12]

State Representative Mark Takai beat out six challengers for the nomination in the Democratic primary. He will face Charles Djou, who beat out serial candidate Allan Levene in the Republican primary.[13] Djou previously represented the 1st District from 2010 to 2011.[14][15]

U.S. House, Hawaii District 1 Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMark Takai 44.5% 52,736
Donna Kim 28.4% 33,678
Stanley Chang 10.2% 12,135
Ikaika Anderson 6.7% 7,937
Will Espero 3.8% 4,555
Joey Manahan 3.8% 4,495
Kathryn Xian 2.6% 3,039
Total Votes 118,575
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections
U.S. House, Hawaii District 1 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngCharles Djou 96.4% 20,802
Allan Levene 3.6% 777
Total Votes 21,579
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections
U.S. House, Hawaii District 1 No Party Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Robert Meyer 51.3% 99
Calvin Griffin 48.7% 94
Total Votes 193
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections

District 2

See also: Hawaii's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2014

Heading into the election the incumbent is Tulsi Gabbard (D), who was first elected in 2012. She was elected with 77% of the vote in 2012. She ran unopposed in the Democratic primary.

Kawika Crowley beat out Marissa Capelouto for the nomination on the Republican ticket. Libertarian candidate Joe Kent will also appear on the general election ballot after he ran unopposed in the primary.[13]

U.S. House, Hawaii District 2 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngKawika Crowley 56.8% 9,094
Marissa Capelouto 43.2% 6,926
Total Votes 16,020
Source: Hawaii Office of Elections

See also

External links

References