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Alabama Term Limit Amendment (2012)

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Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot

The Alabama Term Limit Amendment did not make the November 2012 ballot in the state of Alabama as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would have provided that no person be elected to state legislature for more than three consecutive terms. The measure also stated that service in the state legislature prior to November 2010 would not disqualify a person from service if the proposal was sent to the ballot and passed by voters. The formal title of the measure was Senate Bill 127[1]

Support

Supporters

Arguments

  • In the letter sent to the state legislature from the Our Generation non-profit advocacy group, it stated, "Not only do term limits promote good government, voters overwhelmingly support them. In a survey that Our Generation administered to six million voters nationwide, 96.4 percent of respondents were in favor of term limits. The political culture in Alabama has shown it can produce corruption. Legislators should make changes that reflect their responsibility to serve the people and not their own interests. At a time when many Americans do not trust the government, elected officials should be pursuing policies that instill confidence, and offer solutions that foster a more representative democracy. Term limits accomplish both of these goals."[2]

Media endorsements

Support

  • The Montgomery Advertiser: "Frankly, there is no clear indication that term limits would change anything drastically in the Alabama Legislature, especially with the longer years of service and no lifetime limits that Pittman's proposal allows. Still, this is an issue that the voters of Alabama should be able to decide. We urge members of the Legislature to put the issue on the ballot."[3]

Path to the ballot

Article XVIII of the Alabama Constitution says that it takes a three-fifths (60%) vote of the Alabama State Legislature to qualify an amendment for the ballot.

See also

References