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Alaska Prohibit Airborne Hunting, Measure 3 (1996)

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The Prohibit Airborne Hunting Initiative, also known as Alaska Ballot Measure 3, was on the November 5, 1996 election ballot in Alaska as an indirect initiated state statute, where it was approved.[1]

The initiative prohibited hunting wild wolf, wolverine, fox, or lynx the same day a person was airborne. However, the board of game could allow aerial wolf control if the Commissioner of Fish and Game declared a biological emergency, where wolves in a specific area were causing irreversible loss of a prey population. The law wouldn't apply to people airborne the same day on regular, scheduled commercial flights. Breaking the law would be a misdemeanor. The penalty could be jail time up to one year, a fine up to $5,000, and forfeiture of aircraft or gear used in the offense.

Election results

Alaska Prohibit Airborne Hunting, Measure 3
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 137,635 58.5%
No97,69041.5%

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot said:

"This bill would bar hunting wild wolf, wolverine, fox, or lynx the same day a person was airborne. However, the board of game could allow aerial wolf control if the Commissioner of Fish and Game declared a biological emergency, where wolves in a specific area were causing irreversible loss of a prey population. The law wouldn't apply to people airborne the same day on regular, scheduled commercial flights. Breaking the law would be a misdemeanor. The penalty could be jail time up to one year, a fine up to $5,000, and forfeiture of aircraft or gear used in the offense."[2]

Aftermath

Alaska is one of the I&R states that allows what is called "legislative tampering," which means that the state legislature is allowed to change, alter or revoke initiatives passed by citizens.

In its 2000 legislative session, the Alaska State Legislature passed SB 267 which overturned this initiative.

The legislature also voted to put a proposed constitutional amendment on the 2000 ballot, the Alaska No Voter Initiatives About Wildlife, Measure 1 (2000). It takes a 2/3rds vote of each house of the Alaska legislature to put an amendment on the ballot, which provides evidence that among members of the state legislature, there was strong sentiment in favor of moving toward a system where citizens would not henceforward be allowed to vote on hunting/wildlife initiatives, since if the "No Voter Initiatives About Wildlife" amendment had passed, it would have forbidden Alaskans from ever putting citizen initiatives about hunting on the ballot in the future.

Supporters of the 1996 land-and-shoot ban then collected signatures to place the Alaska Land-And-Shoot Referendum, Measure 6 (2000), a veto referendum on the November 2000 ballot. In that election, 53% of voters upheld the legislature's view of things.[3]

Path to the ballot

  • Application was received in the Lieutenant Governor's Office on August 28, 1995.
  • A copy of the application and signatures were sent to the Department of Law and Division of Elections on August 28, 1995.
  • The Division of Elections determined that there were a sufficient number of sponsor signatures on October 4, 1995.
  • Petition booklets were issued to the initiative committee on October 13, 1995.
  • Petition booklets were submitted to the Division of Elections on January 8, 1996.
  • Lieutenant Governor Ulmer certified the petition for this initiative as properly filed on February 7, 1996.
  • The initiative appeared on the 1996 general election ballot and was approved by a vote of;

See also

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