PGI logo cropped.png
Congressional Millionaire’s Club
The Personal Gain Index shines a light on how members of Congress benefit during their tenure.





Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Grade2.pngA-
Budget Y
600px-Yes check.png
Meetings Y
600px-Yes check.png
Elected Officials Y
600px-Yes check.png
Administrative Officials Y
600px-Yes check.png
Permits, zoning Y
600px-Yes check.png
Audits Y
600px-Yes check.png
Contracts Y
600px-Yes check.png
Lobbying P
Partial.png
Public records Y
600px-Yes check.png
Local taxes Y
600px-Yes check.png
County websitesGuide.png
Transparency grading process


Website evaluation

Main article: Evaluation of Pennsylvania county websites

”’Allegheny County”’ is a county in southwestern [Pennsylvania]. The 2010 census reported the population at 1,223,348, making it the second most populous county in Pennsylvania, following Philadelphia County. The county seat is Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The word “Allegheny” is of Native American, Lenape, origin and is usually said to mean “fine river” or refer to an ancient mythical tribe called “Alegewi” who lived along the river before being overtaken by the Lenape.[1]

This site was most recently evaluated on December 16, 2012.

The good

  • Budget
    • The most current budget is listed.
    • Budgets are archived for 4 years.[2]
  • Administrative Officials
    • Department heads are listed for each department.[3]
    • Contact information for administrative officials is provided including a mailing address, phone number, and personalized email.
  • Elected Officials
    • Elected officials are listed with a mailing address, phone number and personalized email.[4]
  • Meetings
    • Meeting minutes are archived for 6 years.
    • Meeting agendas are archived for 6 years.
    • A meeting calendar is available and names the times and locations of public meetings.
    • Meeting videos are available.[5]
  • Audits
    • The most recent audit is posted.
    • Audits dating back to 2009 are available.[6]
  • Contracts
    • Bids and RFPs are posted online.[7]
    • Approved contract statements are provided for vendors.[8]
  • Public Records
    • The public information officer is identified and maintained by the Open Records Officers. This person provides a mailing address, phone number and personalized email.
    • A public records form is provided.
    • A fee schedule for documents is provided.[9]
  • Taxes
    • Tax revenues are broken down by federal, state, and local funding in the budget.
    • Local taxes, like property taxes, are available online.[10]
    • Residents are able to pay taxes online.[11]
  • Lobbying
    • There is a government relations section of the Adminisrative Division.[12]
  • Permits and zoning
    • Zoning ordinances are posted online.
    • Permit applications can be downloaded on the site, along with information on how to apply for the permits.[13]

The bad

  • Lobbying
    • If the county engaged in lobbying actives or if it's a member of government lobbying associations are not disclosed. Nor is the total cost lobbying activities or membership dues for associations available.
  • No listing the county credit card receipts or posting on the checkbook register.
  • Search function does not always turn up relevant findings

Elected Officials: Council Members

Name District
Dan Onorato County Executive
John DeFazio Council At-Large
Edward Kress Council At-Large
Matt Drozd Council, District 1
Jan Rea Council, District 2
James Burn, Jr. President, Council, District 3
Michael Finnerty Council, District 4
Vince Gastgeb Council, District 5
John Palmiere Council, District 6
Nicholas Futules Council, District 7
Charles Martoni Vice President, Council, District 8
Robert Macey Council, District 9
William Robinson Council, District 10
Barbara Danko Council, District 11
James Ellenbogen Council, District 12
Amanda Hawkins Council, District 13

Administrative Officials

Name Title
Joe Cantanese Director of Constituent Services
Jennifer Liptak Budget Director
VACANT Council Clerk
Jared Barker Director of Legislative Services
Stephen Zappala, Jr. District Attorney
William Mullen Sheriff
John Weinstein County Treasurer
Mark Patrick County Controller

Budget

The total operating budget for 2011 is 767,692,670.[14] Of this, the majority of funds (45.8%) $351,223,455 went towards health and welfare, $162,931,313 (21.2%) went towards general government expenditures, $84,187,885 (11%) towards public safety and $73,184,355 (9.5%) towards debt service.

Stimulus

Allegheny County seat, Pittsburgh, received $348,726,152.91 in federal stimulus funds through 428 contracts and grants.[15]

Local taxes

In 2011, taxes made up 47.8% of total revenue generating $366,980,000. Real estate revenues brought in approximately $8,900,200.

In December 2008, Allegheny County reduced the alcoholic beverage tax from 10% to 7% effective January 2009. All sales of alcoholic beverages, including mixed drinks, wine and beer (opened or unopened) are taxable transactions under law, without exception.[16] The hotel occupancy tax is levied at a rate of 7% and generates general revenue for the state. Revenues generated in calendar year 2010 totaled $24,627,846.35.[17]

County In the News

  • November 2011 redistricting plans will eliminate on Senate and two House districts in the Pittsburgh region, all represented by Democrats. A public hearing is set for Nov. 18 2011, and a final plan must be approved by Nov. 30.[18]
  • In August 2011, the Superior Court in Pittsburgh rejected Republic state Sen. Jane Orie’s claim that it would be double jeopardy to retry her in October on charges that she misused state-funded staff to do her campaign work.[19]

Lobbying

Main article:Pennsylvania government sector lobbying

Allegheny County has reported $2,053,000 spent lobbying since 2000. The peak year is 2005 with $431,000 spent on lobbying, although thus far, only the first quarter of 2009 is reported.

Reported lobbying expenditures, 2000-2009[20]
Year Amount spent on lobbying
2009 $40,000
2008 $265,000
2007 $213,000
2006 $340,000
2005 $431,000
2004 $199,000
2003 $195,000
2002 $165,000
2001 $170,000
2000 $35,000

The Allegheny County Airport Authority[21] received funding for lobbying activities for all the years between 2000 and 2009, for a total of $554,000. The Allegheny County Housing Authority received lobbying funds from 2001 to 2008 and spent more on lobbying since 2000 than any other Allegheny subsidiary, totaling $620,000.

Lobbying subtotals by agency[20]
Year Airport Authority Economic Development Housing Authority Sanitary Authority Allegheny County, PA Parent Allegheny County, PA
2009 $20,000 - - $20,000 - -
2008 $80,000 - $80,000 $105,000 - -
2007 $73,000 - $60,000 $80,000 - -
2006 $120,000 $120,000 $40,000 $60,000 - -
2005 $65,000 $120,000 $80,000 $40,000 $126,000 -
2004 $46,000 $20,000 $80,000 $40,000 - $13,000
2003 $75,000 - $80,000 $40,000 - -
2002 $30,000 - $100,000 $40,000 - -
2001 $30,000 - $100,000 $40,000 - -
2000 $15,000 - - $20,000 - -

Municipalities

Cities

Boroughs

Presidential election votes

Presidential Election Results 1960-2004
Year Democrat Republican
2004 57.15% 368,912 42.13% 271,925
2000 56.65% 329,963 40.41% 235,361
1996 52.82% 284,480 37.89% 204,067
1992 52.75% 324,004 29.80% 183,035
1988 59.51% 348,814 39.43% 231,137
1984 55.96% 372,576 42.76% 284,692
1980 47.87% 297,464 43.75% 271,850
1976 50.68% 328,343 46.79% 303,127
1972 42.26% 282,496 55.60% 371,737
1968 51.12% 364,906 37.09% 264,790
1964 66.03% 475,207 33.58% 241,707
1960 57.07% 428,455 42.76% 320,970


Public employee salaries

Main article: Allegheny County employee salaries

External links

References