Arizona's 4th Congressional District

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Arizona's 4th Congressional District
Arizona's 4th.jpg
Current incumbentPaul Gosar Republican Party
Population707,750
Gender51.4% Male, 48.6% Female
Race86.8% White, 2.2% Native Am., 1.7% Black
Ethnicity19.4% Hispanic
Unemployment13.9%
Median household income$40,802
High school graduation rate86.9%
College graduation rate17.7%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 4th District covers the entire western portion of Arizona. Mohave, Yavapai, Gila, Pinal, La Paz and Yuma counties are included in the new district boundaries.[1]

The current representative of the 4th Congressional District is Paul Gosar (R).[2]

Elections

2014

See also: Arizona's 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 4th Congressional District of Arizona will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

General election candidates

Republican Party Paul Gosar
Democratic Party Mikel Weisser
Libertarian Party Chris Rike


August 26, 2014, primary results
Republican Party Republican Primary

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Libertarian Party Libertarian Party

Not on ballot

Republican Party Kristopher Mortensen

2012

See also: Arizona's 4th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 4th Congressional District of Arizona held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Ed Pastor decided to run for the 7th District in 2012, and Paul Gosar (R) won the 4th District seat in the 2012 general election.[3]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Gosar Incumbent 66.8% 162,907
     Democratic Johnnie Robinson 28.4% 69,154
     Libertarian Joe Pamelia 3.8% 9,306
     Independent Richard Grayson 1% 2,393
Total Votes 243,760
Source: Arizona Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Janet Contreras (R), Joe Cobb (L) and Rebecca Dewitt (G) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 66.9% 61,524
     Republican Janet Contreras 27.5% 25,300
     Libertarian Joe Cobb 3% 2,718
     Green Rebecca Dewitt 2.6% 2,365
Total Votes 91,907

2008
On November 4, 2008, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Don Karg (R), Joe Cobb (L) and Rebecca DeWitt (G) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 72.1% 89,721
     Republican Don Karg 21.2% 26,435
     Green Rebecca DeWitt 3.6% 4,464
     Libertarian Joe Cobb 3.1% 3,807
Total Votes 124,427

2006
On November 7, 2006, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Don Karg (R) and Ronald Harders (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 72.5% 56,464
     Republican Don Karg 23.9% 18,627
     Libertarian Ronald Harders 3.6% 2,770
Total Votes 77,861

2004
On November 2, 2004, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Don Karg (R) and Gary Fallon (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 70.1% 77,150
     Republican Don Karg 25.7% 28,238
     Libertarian Gary Fallon 4.2% 4,639
Total Votes 110,027

2002
On November 5, 2002, Ed Pastor won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jonathan Barnert (R) and Amy Gibbons (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Pastor incumbent 67.4% 44,517
     Republican Jonathan Barnert 27.8% 18,381
     Libertarian Amy Gibbons 4.8% 3,167
Total Votes 66,065

2000
On November 7, 2000, John Shadegg won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ben Jankoski (D) and Ernest Hancock (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Shadegg incumbent 64% 140,396
     Democratic Ben Jankoski 32.7% 71,803
     Libertarian Ernest Hancock 3.3% 7,298
Total Votes 219,497

1998
On November 3, 1998, John Shadegg won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Eric Ehst (D), Ernest Hancock (L) and Doug Quelland (I) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Shadegg incumbent 64.7% 102,722
     Democratic Eric Ehst 31.2% 49,538
     Libertarian Ernest Hancock 2.4% 3,805
     Independent Doug Quelland 1.7% 2,757
Total Votes 158,822

1996
On November 5, 1996, John Shadegg won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Maria Elena Milton (D) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Shadegg incumbent 66.8% 150,486
     Democratic Maria Elena Milton 33.2% 74,857
Total Votes 225,343

1994
On November 8, 1994, John Shadegg won election to the United States House. He defeated Carol Cure (D) and Mark Yannone (L) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Shadegg 60.2% 116,714
     Democratic Carol Cure 36% 69,760
     Libertarian Mark Yannone 3.8% 7,428
Total Votes 193,902

1992
On November 3, 1992, Jon Kyl won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Walter Mybeck, II (D), Debbie Collings (I) and Tim McDermott (L) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJon Kyl incumbent 59.2% 156,330
     Democratic Walter Mybeck, II 26.7% 70,572
     Independent Debbie Collings 9.7% 25,553
     Libertarian Tim McDermott 4.4% 11,611
Total Votes 264,066

1990
On November 6, 1990, Jon Kyl won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mark Ivey, Jr. (D) in the general election.[14]

U.S. House, Arizona District 4 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJon Kyl incumbent 61.3% 141,843
     Democratic Mark Ivey, Jr. 38.7% 89,395
Total Votes 231,238

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 4th Congressional District of Arizona after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Arizona

In 2011, the Arizona State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

Gender/wage gap

Arizona's 4th is 1 of just 12 congressional districts in the nation where women have a higher median income than men. Women earn $111 more than men in the district, although statewide, women earn nearly $6,500 less than men on average. The largest wage gap in the state is Arizona's 8th Congressional District, where men earn nearly $12,500 more than women.[15]

See also

External links

References

  1. Arizona Redistricting, "Map," accessed July 7, 2012
  2. ABC News, "General Election Results 2012-Arizona," November 7, 2012
  3. ABC News, "General Election Results 2012-Arizona," November 7, 2012
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  15. Arizona Daily Star, "AZ's rare CD4: Where women out-earn men," September 27, 2012