Arizona Distribution of Vehicle Tax Amendment, Proposition 105 (1974)

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Arizona Distribution of Vehicle Tax Amendment, also known as Proposition 105, was on the November 5, 1974 election ballot in Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. It was defeated.[1]

Election results

Proposition 104
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No323,63967.2%
Yes 157,504 32.8%
These results are from the Arizona elections department 1974 voter pamphlet.

Text of measure

Official title

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA RELATING TO USE AND DISTRIBUTION OF VEHICLE, USER AND GASOLINE AND DIESEL TAX RE­CEIPTS, AND AMENDING ARTICLE 9, SECTION 14, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA[1][2]

Descriptive title

An Amendment relating to the use and distribution of vehicle, user and gasoline and diesel tax receipts; amending Article 9, Section 14, Arizona Constitution, by adding thereto authorization to use such tax receipts for public transportation purposes as defined by law, bicycle and foot pathways, equestrian trails, overpasses, underpasses and parkways If you favor the above law, vote YES; if opposed, vote NO[1][2]

Summary

The summary from the Legislative Council for this measure was:

Proposition 105 would broaden the constitutional authorization for the expenditure of revenues derived from motor vehicle- related taxes and fees ( such as gasoline taxes and automobile license fees) by permitting the use of such funds for additional general transportation needs, including bike and foot pathways, horseback riding trails, alternative methods of public transportation, underpasses and overpasses, and parkways.

Current constitutional law stipulates that such funds may be used only for purposes relating to highways and streets. The amendment would specifically authorize the use of the state share of such funds for the construction, maintenance, and repair of bicycle and foot pathways and horseback riding trails. In addition, that portion of highway-related revenue distributed to Arizona's counties and municipalities could be used for such additional purposes as alternative modes of public transportation, overpasses, underpasses, parkways, bicycle pathways and facilities, foot pathways, and horseback riding trails. Chapter 108 ( SB. 1056, 1974 Regular Session), which would become effective upon passage of this constitutional amendment, would require the Director of the Department of Transportation to lay out, establish, and maintain a system of bicycle and foot pathways along certain state highways.

In anticipation of this duty, a comprehensive bikeways study was prepared by Bivens and Associates, Inc, , in 1973, which contains detailed recommendations regarding the planning, design, construction, and maintenance of a statewide network of integrated bicycle and foot pathways .. The Bivens bikeway study further reports that at least four states currently use gasoline tax dollars for bike paths, including Oregon, which allocates one percent of its gasoline tax for bike path construction, and Maryland, New York, and California.[1][2]

Full text

The full text of the legislation proposed by this proposition is available here.


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Support

Arguments in favor of this measure can be found here.

Opposition

Arguments in opposition to this measure can be found here.

See also

External links

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Secretary of State 1974 voter pamphlet, accessed January 3, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.