Arizona Minimum Wage Inflation Adjustment Amendment (2012)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot

The Minimum Wage Inflation Adjustment Amendment did not make the November 6, 2012 general election ballot in the state of Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure would have scrapped the minimum wage inflation adjustment in the state. Specifically, the measure would have done away with the $7.65 minimum wage if the national minimum wage of $7.25 ever surpassed it.[1]

Path to the ballot

A majority vote is required in the Arizona State Legislature to send a constitutional amendment to the ballot. Arizona is one of ten states that allow a referred amendment to go on the ballot after a majority vote in one session of the state's legislature.

On March 5, 2012, the measure was approved by the Arizona House of Representatives, sending the measure to the Arizona State Senate.[1]

However, on March 20, 2012, Steve Court, the main proponent of the legislation, abandoned the measure. Court stated that the measure was lagging behind in polls, particularly in the restaurant industry, which reports say would be heavily affected by the law.[2]

See also

References