Arizona Proceeds from Sale of State Lands for Schools, Proposition 104 (2002)

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Proposition 104 appeared on the November 5, 2002 ballot, in Arizona, as a legislatively-referred state statute. It was approved.[1]

Proposition 104 would authorize giving proceeds from the sale of state lands to schools. Proposition 300, which was also approved on November 5, 2002, established exactly how these funds would be distributed.

Election results

Proceeds from Sale of State Lands for Schools
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 758,695 70.1%
No323,62629.9%
Election results from Arizona Elections Department.

Text of measure

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The Arizona Constitution requires the Economic Estimates Commission (EEC) to annually establish an aggregate expenditure limitation of local revenues for all Arizona school districts. The EEC calculates the aggregate expenditure limitation by adjusting the base level expenditures of local revenues to reflect changes in the student population and cost of living. The Constitution prohibits school districts from spending more than the aggregate expenditure limitation established by the EEC. The Constitution excludes certain revenues from the definition of local revenues, thereby making those monies exempt from the aggregate expenditure limitation.

In 2000, the voters approved a ballot measure increasing the state transaction privilege (sales) tax and allocating the additional revenue derived from the increase for various education purposes. The additional revenue is subject to the aggregate expenditure limitation. Proposition 104 would exempt from the aggregate expenditure limitation revenue derived from the transaction privilege (sales) tax rate increase for educational purposes that was authorized by the voters in 2000.

Proposition 300, which is also being voted on at this, the 2002 election, specifies how income from public lands is to be used for educational purposes. If both Proposition 104 and Proposition 300 are approved by the voters at the 2002 election, the monies received from public lands for educational purposes as provided in Proposition 300 will be exempt from the aggregate expenditure limitation. (1152)[2]

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