Arizona School District Debt Limits Amendment, Proposition 100 (1978)

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Arizona School District Debt Limits Amendment, also known as Proposition 100, was on the November 7, 1978 election ballot in Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. It was defeated.[1]

Election results

Proposition 100
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No312,91964.4%
Yes 173,163 35.6%
These results are from the Arizona elections department.

Text of measure

Official title

A concurrent resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of Arizona relating to common, high school and unified school district debt limits.[1][2]

Descriptive title

Amending Arizona Constitution, Article IX, Sections 8 and 8.1 allowing common and high school districts to exceed existing 10% debt limit by 5% of taxable property value; unified districts to exceed existing 20% debt limit by 10% subject to the majority approval of the district's qualified electors.

A " yes" vote shall have the effect of allowing an increase in existing school district debt limits subject to voter approval.

A " no" vote shall have the effect of not allowing an increase in existing school district debt limits.[1][2]

Summary

The summary from the Legislative Council for this measure was:

The Constitution of Arizona currently prohibits both common and high school districts from incurring debts exceeding an amount equal to ten percent of the value of the district's taxable property. Unified school districts, which provide both common and high school instruction, are similarly prohibited from incurring debts exceeding twenty percent. Proposition 100 would allow both common and high school districts on a majority vote of the qualified electors of the district to exceed the exist­ing ten percent limit by an additional five percent of the value of the taxable property of the district if:

1. The current property tax levied by the district for payment of interest and redemption of outstanding bonds is at least one dollar per one hundred dollars assessed valuation; and

2. The district's existing bonded indebtedness, excluding cash held by the district to pay the indebtedness, on January 1 of the current fiscal year is equal to at least eighty percent of the ten percent limit.

Proposition 100 would similarly allow unified school districts on a majority vote of the qualified electors of the district to exceed the existing twenty percent limit by an additional ten percent of the value of the taxable property of the district if:

1. The current property tax levied by the district for payment of interest and redemption of outstanding bonds is at least two dollars per one hundred dollars assessed valuation; and

2. The district's existing bonded indebtedness, excluding cash held by the district to pay the indebtedness, on January 1 of the current fiscal year is equal to at least eighty percent of the twenty percent limit.[1][2]

Full text

The full text of the legislation proposed by this proposition is available here.


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Support

Arguments in favor of this measure can be found here.

Opposition

Arguments in opposition to this measure can be found here.

See also

External links

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 National Conference of State Legislators, ballot measure database, accessed January 3, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.