Arizona State Appropriations Limitation Amendment, Proposition 106 (1974)

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Arizona State Appropriations Limitation Amendment, also known as Proposition 106, was on the November 5, 1974 election ballot in Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. It was defeated.[1]

Election results

Proposition 106
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No237,65951.3%
Yes 225,488 48.7%
These results are from the Arizona elections department 1974 voter pamphlet.

Text of measure

Official title

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION PROPOSING AN AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA RELATING TO PUBLIC DEBT, REVENUE AND TAXATION; LIMITING STATE APPROPRIATIONS TO A PERCENTAGE OF STATE PERSONAL INCOME; ESTABLISHING AN ECONOMIC ESTI­MATES COMMISSION; PRESCRIBING POWERS AND DUTIES, AND AMENDING ARTI­CLE 9, CONSTITUTION OF ARIZONA, BY ADDING SECTION 17[1][2]

Descriptive title

[1][2]

Summary

The summary from the Legislative Council for this measure was:

The constitutional amendment contained in Proposition 106 would limit the total dollar amount available for legislative appropriation from state tax revenues to a maximum eight and four- tenths percent of Arizona's estimated total personal income during the same fiscal year. This constitutional state spending ceiling could be exceeded only by an affirmative vote on each appropriation of two- thirds of the membership of each house of the Legislature. This amendment would also constitutionally establish a three- member Economic Estimates Commission to determine the estimated total personal income in the state for use in computing the annual legislative appropriation ceiling. The commission would consist of the Director of the Depart­ment of Revenue, who would serve as chairman, plus one person appointed by the President of the Senate and another by the Speaker of the House The appointive members would be required to be knowledgeable in economics and no commission member could be a member of the Legislature. Statutory law defines state tax revenues ( the spending of which would be limited by the amendment) as those state fees and taxes levied on property, income, transaction privilege ( sales) and 22 Pamphlet Containing Amendments to be use, excise, fuel, luxury privilege, insurance premiums, estates, gifts, motor carriers, and all other taxes levied and collected by the state for its own use. Spending limitations would not, however, apply to revenue derived from ( I) federal, private, and other grants; ( 2) sales, dividends, interest, and services; ( 3) trust and agency funds; ( 4) intrastate service funds, bond funds, and endowment earnings; or ( 5) that portion of tax revenue collected by the state for distribution to counties and municipalities. Proposition 106 would also provide for adjustments to be made in the spending limitation percentage in the event of a transfer of the cost of any governmental function or program between the federal and state government or between the state and its political subdivisions Under such circumstances, the spending limitation percentage would be increased or decreased commensurately to reflect the resulting change in fiscal burdens between the governmental levels involved.[1][2]

Full text

The full text of the legislation proposed by this proposition is available here.


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Support

Arguments in favor of this measure can be found here.

Opposition

Arguments in opposition to this measure can be found here.

See also

External links

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Secretary of State 1974 voter pamphlet, accessed January 3, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.