Arizona school districts

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K-12 Education in Arizona
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Education facts
State Superintendent: John Huppenthal
Number of students: 1,080,319[1]
Number of teachers: 50,800
Teacher/pupil ratio: 1:21.3
Number of school districts: 662
Number of schools: 2,252
Graduation rate: 76%[2]
Per-pupil spending: $7,666[3]
See also
Arizona Department of Education
Arizona school districts
List of school districts in Arizona
Arizona
School boards portal
Policypedia
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Education policy project
Public education in the United States
Public education in Arizona
Glossary of education terms

Arizona is home to 2,252 schools and 1,080,319 K-12 students.[4]

Quick facts

State school administrators

  • State Board of Education
    • State Superintendent John Huppenthal, Executive Officer and Superintendent
    • Thomas Tyree, County School Superintendent
    • Roger Jacks, High School District Superintendent
    • Greg Miller, Charter School Administrator
    • Dr. Ann Hart, University President
    • Dr. James Rottweiler, Community College President
    • Amy Hamilton, Classroom Teacher
    • Cheryl Rogers, Public Member
    • Jaime Molera, Public Member
    • Jacob Moore, Public Member
    • Reginald Ballantyne III, Public Member

Statistics

The following table displays the state's top 10 school districts by total student enrollment and the top 10 school districts by per-pupil spending.

Student enrollment, 2011-2012 Per-pupil spending, 2011-2012[5]
1.) Mesa Public Schools 1.) Rainbow Accommodation School
2.) Tucson Unified School District 2.) Vernon Elementary School District 9
3.) Chandler Unified School District 3.) Colorado City Unified School District
4.) Gilbert Public Schools 4.) Sentinel Elementary School District 71
5.) Peoria Unified School District 5.) Valley Vocational Services
6.) Deer Valley Unified School District 6.) Crown King Elementary School District 41
7.) Paradise Valley Unified School District 7.) Mobile Elementary School District 86
8.) Scottsdale Unified School District 8.) Cedar Unified School District 25
9.) Phoenix Union High School District 9.) Yarnell Elementary School District 52
10.) Dysart Unified School District 10.) J. O. Combs Elementary School District 44

Demographics

See also: Demographic information for all students in all 50 states

The following table displays the ethnic distribution of students in Arizona as reported in the Common Core of Data for 2011-2012.[6]

Demographic information for Arizona's K-12 public school system
Ethnicity Students State Percentage United States Percentage**
American Indian 54,596 5.05% 1.10%
Asian 30,079 2.78% 4.68%
African American 58,029 5.37% 15.68%
Hawaiian Nat./Pacific Isl. Students 2,880 0.27% 0.42%
Hispanic 462,624 42.82% 24.37%
White 455,010 42.12% 51.21%
Two or more 17,101 1.58% 2.54%
**Note: This is the percentage of all students in the United States that are reported to be of this ethnicity.

In the news

New funding for school-safety resource officers

New funding for school-safety resource officers has been awarded to 137 school sites in 32 Arizona school districts. The Arizona State Legislature approved $12 million dollars for the project, $7 million of which came from Proposition 301, a sales tax for education that was approved by voters in 2000. Many of the awarded sites received funding for a school officer for the first time, and many others had their funding renewed. Three juvenile probation officer positions were also included in the funding.[7]

In order to receive funding, schools had to apply to the Arizona Department of Education. The schools were then ranked according to scores from a need-based formula, and the highest-scoring schools were given funding.[7]

State law

Common Core

Common Core, or the Common Core State Standards Initiative, is an American education initiative that outlines quantifiable benchmarks in English and mathematics at each grade level from kindergarten through high school. The Arizona State Board of Education adopted the standards on June 28, 2010. Full implementation was set to be achieved in the 2013-2014 academic year.[8][9]

School board composition

School board members are generally elected by residents of the school district. If there is a vacancy on the school board, the county school superintendent has the right to appoint a member to the school board. The term of the appointment will be until the next regular election for school board members, and then a member will be elected by residents of the school district.[10] School boards must have at least three members, but school districts can increase the school board to five members. School board members serve four-year terms.[11]

District types

Arizona contains multiple types of school districts, including: common school districts, joint common school districts, joint technological education districts, joint unified school districts, unified school districts and union high school districts.[12]

Term limits

Arizona does not limit the number of terms a school board member may serve.[13]

School board elections

Upcoming elections

See also: Arizona school board elections, 2014

A total of 30 Arizona school districts among America's largest school districts by enrollment will hold elections in 2014 for 71 seats. Each district has scheduled elections on November 4, 2014.

Here are several quick facts about Arizona's school board elections in 2014:

The districts listed below served 636,612 K-12 students during the 2010-2011 school year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.[14] Click on the district names for more information on the district and its school board elections.

2014 Arizona School Board Elections
District Date Seats up for election Total board seats Student enrollment
Alhambra Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 13,944
Amphitheater Public Schools 11/4/2014 2 5 14,873
Cartwright Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 17,671
Chandler Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 38,763
Deer Valley Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 35,179
Dysart Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 24,148
Flagstaff Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 10,129
Gilbert Public Schools 11/4/2014 2 5 38,038
Glendale Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 12,776
Glendale Union High School District 11/4/2014 2 5 14,777
Higley Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 10,074
Kyrene Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 17,812
Litchfield Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 10,291
Marana Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 12,924
Mesa Public Schools 11/4/2014 2 5 65,103
Paradise Valley Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 32,933
Pendergast Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 9,688
Peoria Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 36,763
Phoenix Union High School District 11/4/2014 5 7 24,866
Roosevelt Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 10,449
Scottsdale Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 26,213
Sunnyside Unified District 11/4/2014 2 5 17,122
Tempe Elementary School District 11/4/2014 2 5 13,803
Tempe Union High School District 11/4/2014 2 5 12,059
Tolleson Union High School District 11/4/2014 2 5 9,375
Tucson Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 53,299
Vail Unified School District 11/4/2014 2 5 10,614
Washington Elementary School District 11/4/2014 3 5 22,238
Yuma Elementary School District 11/4/2014 9 5 9,578
Yuma Union High School District 11/4/2014 2 5 11,110


Path to the ballot

To qualify for the ballot as a school board candidate, an individual must be:[15]

  • A resident of the school district for at least one year
  • A registered voter in Arizona

Candidates cannot be employed by the school district they are running to represent, cannot be a current member of another school board and cannot be related to a member of the school board who has served in the last four years.[15]

Campaign finance

Before accepting contributions, making expenditures, distributing campaign literature or circulating petitions, candidates must file a Statement of Organization form or a $500 Threshold Exemption Statement with the county elections department. The $500 Threshold Exemption Statement can only be filed if a candidate does not intend on spending or accepting contributions in excess of $500, including the candidate's own money. If funds are received or spent in excess of $500 after filing the $500 Threshold Exemption Statement, the candidate must file a Statement of Organization within five days. If a candidate files a Statement of Organization, he or she must file regular campaign finance reports with the county elections department.[16][17]

See also

External links

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References

  1. National Center for Education Statistics, "Table 2. Number of operating public schools and districts, state enrollment, teacher and pupil/teacher ratio by state: School year 2011–12," accessed March 18, 2014
  2. ED Data Express, "State Tables Report," accessed March 17, 2014 The site includes this disclaimer: "States converted to an adjusted cohort graduation rate [starting in the 2010-2011 school year], which may or may not be the same as the calculation they used in prior years. Due to the potential differences, caution should be used when comparing graduation rates across states."
  3. United States Census Bureau, "Public Education Finances: 2011," accessed March 18, 2014
  4. State Education Data Profiles, "Arizona," accessed August 14, 2013
  5. Homesurfer, "School District Ranking Report," accessed July 8, 2014
  6. United States Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, "Common Core of Data (CCD), State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey, 2011-2012," accessed May 7, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 AZ Central, "$12 million OK'd for school officers in 32 districts," June 24, 2014
  8. Common Core State Standards Initiative, "Core Standards in your State,” accessed June 12, 2014
  9. Arizona Department of Education, "Arizona's College and Career Ready Standards (AZCCRS) Home Page," accessed June 13, 2014
  10. Arizona Revised Statutes, "Title 15, Section 302," accessed July 8, 2014
  11. Arizona Revised Statutes, "Title 15, Section 424," accessed July 8, 2014
  12. United States Census Bureau, "Arizona," accessed July 8, 2014
  13. Osborn School District, "Governing Board," accessed July 8, 2014
  14. National Center for Education Statistics, "Elementary/Secondary Information System," accessed March 21, 2014
  15. 15.0 15.1 Arizona Revised Statutes, "Title 15, Section 421," accessed July 8, 2014
  16. Maricopa County, "Candidate/Campaign Information Center," accessed July 8, 2014
  17. Maricopa County, "$500 Threshold Exemption Statement," accessed July 8, 2014