Arkansas Hemp and Cannabis Amendment (2014)

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The Arkansas Hemp and Cannabis Amendment is not on the November 4, 2014 ballot in Arkansas as an initiated constitutional amendment. The measure would have allowed for the cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, sale, possession and use of cannabis and products derived from it. It would also have asserted the preemption of federal law on the matter. This means that even if the measure had passed, it would not have taken effect unless federal laws regarding cannabis were changed.[1][2]

Text of measure

Popular name

The official popular name given to this measure by the attorney general was "The Arkansas Hemp and Cannabis Amendment."[3]

Ballot title

The official ballot title given to this initiative by the attorney general was as follows:[3]

An amendment proposed by the people to the Arkansas Constitution to provide, effective April 20, 2015, that the cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, sale, possession and use of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis) and all products derived from the cannabis plant (genus cannabis) are lawful in every geographic area of each and every county of this state; that, for purposes of this amendment, “hemp” is defined as any part of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis), living or not, containing one percent or less, by dry weight, Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC); that, for purposes of this amendment, “cannabis” is defined as any part of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis), living or not, containing greater than one percent, by dry weight, Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC); that the listed activities relating to “cannabis” devoted to personal, industrial or commercial use may be regulated but not prohibited by the General Assembly; and that the listed activities relating to “hemp” devoted to personal, industrial or commercial use may be regulated but not prohibited, subject to the condition that the number of plants cultivated or the products derived from manufacturing shall not be limited or prohibited by the General Assembly. Preemptive federal law will remain in effect unless altered by Congress.[4]

Support

Robert L. Reed was the applicant for this initiative's proposal.[3][5]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Arkansas & Amending the Arkansas Constitution

To place an initiated constitutional amendment on the ballot, petitioners were required to submit signatures equal to at least 10 percent of the total number of votes cast for the office of governor in the last gubernatorial election. Further, proponents were required to collect signatures equaling at least 5 percent of the previous gubernatorial votes in at least 15 of the state's counties. For example, if 1,000 people voted for governor in a county, the signatures of 50 qualified electors would have been required. This means supporters were required to collect a minimum of 78,133 valid signatures by July 7, 2014. The attorney general only certified the initiative for petition circulation on June 4, 2014, giving supports a little over a month to collect the required signatures. The secretary of state would have had until August 21, 2014 to certify the measure for the November general election.[6] However, no signatures were submitted by the prescribed deadline.

Similar measures

See also

External links

Additional reading

References