Arnie Moltis

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Arnie Moltis
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Candidate for
Governor of West Virginia
PartyDemocratic
Websites
Campaign website
Arnie "Arne" Moltis was a 2012 Democratic candidate for Governor of West Virginia in the 2012 elections. He lost to incumbent Earl Ray Tomblin in the May 8th primary.[1] He also ran for governor in the 2011 special election, but placed last in the May 14, 2011 primary election with 0.38% of the vote.
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Biography

Moltis is a history teacher and a small business owner.

In an April 22, 2011 candidate profile, he told the Beckley Register Herald, " I don’t drink at all, I don’t touch the stuff. I don’t drink. I don’t smoke. I do chase women, like the prime minister of Italy, but that’s about it."[2]

Elections

2012

See also: West Virginia gubernatorial election, 2012 and West Virginia state executive official elections, 2012

Moltis lost to incumbent Earl Ray Tomblin in the Democratic primary on May 8, 2012.[1]

Issues

On his campaign website, Moltis outlines where he stands on the following issues:[3]

  • The Death Penalty in WV: "One of the biggest issues facing West Virginians today is whether or not we should reinstate the death penalty in our beloved state. There are too many innocent people sitting in our prisons for me in good conscience to say that this would be a good option for our state."
  • Women's rights: "I support a woman's right to choose only in the instance that the mother's life is in immediate danger. An unborn child has to right for a chance at life, a chance to reach his or her full potential."
  • Energy: "West Virginian's should not have to choose between putting food on their tables and heating their homes. As governor, I will hold the electric companies and the Public Service Commission accountable for their actions and demand lower prices for the state."
  • Teachers: "I vow to protect the educators in this great state. The men and women educating our future should not have to worry whether their retirement funds will still be there when the time comes for them to use it."
2011
State Executive elections

KentuckyLouisiana
MississippiWest Virginia

GubernatorialLt. Governor
Attorney GeneralSecretary of State
Down ballot offices: (KY, LA, MS)

NewsCalendar

2011

See also: West Virginia special gubernatorial election, 2011 and West Virginia state executive official elections, 2011

West Virginia was not scheduled to hold a gubernatorial election until 2012. However, elected Democrat Joe Manchin gave up the seat to join the U.S. Senate in the 2010 midterms. Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, also a Democrat, took over the office as West Virginia does not have a lieutenant governor.

Moltis placed last in the May 14, 2011 primary, with 0.38%

2011 Race for Governor - Democratic Primary
Candidates Percentage
Jeffrey V. Kessler 5.30%
Arnie Moltis 0.38%
John D. Perdue 12.54%
Natalie E. Tenant 17.30%
Richard "Rick" Thompson 24.11%
Green check mark.jpg Earl Ray Tomblin 40.37%
Total votes 126,888

Issues

Moltis describes himself as a proud Democrat. He opposes reinstating the death penalty on the grounds that West Virginia has too many wrongly convicted people. He opposes abortion in all instances except an immediate threat to the mother's life.

The fact that much of West Virginia's electricity is generate by a plant in Ohio is a central plank in Moltis' platform; he feels rates are too high and the contract reflects illicit interests of sitting politicians. He has connected Acting Governor Earl Ray Tomblin to this and, on his campaign site, refers to Tomblin as, "a bull tyrant in disguise."[4]

Personal

Moltis has five children.

See also

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External links

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References