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Article 19, Arizona Constitution

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Arizona Constitution
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Preamble
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Article XIX of the Arizona Constitution is entitled Mines. It has only two sections; the first lays out the boundaries, and the second prescribes the method for revising them, if necessary.

Article XIX has been amended twice, both times in 1992. These amendments reevaluated versions one and two of section 1.[1]

Section 0

Version 1

(Version amended by Proposition 101 (1992))

This amendment lengthened the term of office of the State Mine Inspector. Proposition 101, after becoming adopted, increased the term of office to a four-year term from a two-year term. This amendment was effective upon the entrance of the State Mine Inspector who was elected in the November 1994 general election. This proposition does not limit the number of times a person can be elected to the office of State Mine Inspector[2].

Text of Section 0, Version 1:

Mines

Section 0

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The office of mine inspector is hereby established. The legislature shall enact laws so regulating the operation and equipment of all mines in the state as to provide for the health and safety of workers therein and in connection therewith, and fixing the duties of said office. Upon approval of such laws by the governor, the governor, with the advice and consent of the senate, shall forthwith appoint a mine inspector, who shall serve until his successor shall have been elected at the first general election thereafter and shall qualify. Said successor and all subsequent incumbents of said office shall be elected at general elections, and shall serve for four years. The initial four year term shall be served by the mine inspector elected in the general election held in November, 1994.[1]

Version 2

(Version amended by Proposition 107 (1992))

Proposition 107 limited the number of terms that a person may serve in federal and state elective offices. With the exception of the office of State Treasurer, there were no limits on the number of terms a person may serve in these offices before proposition 107. This proposal requires that a person must "sit out" from that office for a full term before running for the same office again, once that person has served for the maximum time in that particular office.[2]

Text of Section 0, Version 2:

Mines

Section 0

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The office of mine inspector is hereby established. The legislature, at its first session, shall enact laws so regulating the operation and equipment of all mines in the state as to provide for the health and safety of workers therein and in connection therewith, and fixing the duties of said office. Upon approval of such laws by the governor, the governor, with the advice and consent of the senate, shall forthwith appoint a mine inspector, who shall serve until his successor shall have been elected at the first general election thereafter and shall qualify. Said successor and all subsequent incumbents of said office shall be elected at general elections, and shall serve for a term of two years. No mine inspector shall serve more than four consecutive terms in that office. No mine inspector, after serving the maximum number of terms, which shall include any part of a term served, may serve in the same office until out of office for no less than one full term.

This limitation on the number of terms of consecutive service shall apply to terms of office beginning on or after January 1, 1993.[1]

Amendments

See also

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