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Article III, South Dakota Constitution

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South Dakota Constitution
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Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIIXIXXXXXIXXIIXXIIIXXIVXXVXXVIXXVIIXXVIIIXXIX
Article III of the South Dakota Constitution is entitled Legislative Department and consists of 32 sections.

Section 1

Text of Section 1:

Legislative Power--Initiative and Referendum

The legislative power of the state shall be vested in a Legislature which shall consist of a senate and house of representatives. However, the people expressly reserve to themselves the right to propose measures, which shall be submitted to a vote of the electors of the state, and also the right to require that any laws which the Legislature may have enacted shall be submitted to a vote of the electors of the state before going into effect, except such laws as may be necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health or safety, support of the state government and its existing public institutions. Not more than five percent of the qualified electors of the state shall be required to invoke either the initiative or the referendum.

This section shall not be construed so as to deprive the Legislature or any member thereof of the right to propose any measure. The veto power of the Executive shall not be exercised as to measures referred to a vote of the people. This section shall apply to municipalities. The enacting clause of all laws approved by vote of the electors of the state shall be: "Be it enacted by the people of South Dakota." The Legislature shall make suitable provisions for carrying into effect the provisions of this section.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1897, ch 39, approved Nov. 8, 1898; amendment proposed by SL 1913, ch 132, rejected Nov. 3, 1914; amendment proposed by SL 1921, ch 146, rejected Nov., 1922; amendment proposed by SL 1969, ch 242, rejected Nov. 3, 1970; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendments proposed by SL 1980, chs 2 and 3, rejected Nov. 4, 1980; amendment proposed by SL 1987, ch 1, approved November 8, 1988.[1]

Section 2

Text of Section 2:

Number of Legislators--Regular Sessions

After the Legislature elected for the years 1937 and 1938 the number of members of the house of representatives shall not be less than fifty nor more than seventy-five and the number of members of the senate shall not be less than twenty-five nor more than thirty-five.

The sessions of the Legislature shall be biennial except as otherwise provided in this Constitution.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1935, ch 136, approved Nov., 1936; amendment proposed by SL 1937, ch 154, rejected Nov., 1938; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 2, rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[2]

Section 3

Text of Section 3:

Qualifications for Legislative Office--Officers Ineligible

No person is eligible for the office of senator who is not a qualified elector in the district from which such person is chosen, a citizen of the United States, and who has not attained the age of twenty-one years, and who has not been a resident of the state for two years next preceding election.

No person is eligible for the office of representative who is not a qualified elector in the district from which such person is chosen, and a citizen of the United States, and who has not been a resident of the state for two years next preceding election, and who has not attained the age of twenty-one years.

No judge or clerk of any court, secretary of state, attorney general, state's attorney, recorder, sheriff or collector of public moneys, member of either house of Congress, or person holding any lucrative office under the United States, or this state, or any foreign government, shall be a member of the Legislature: provided, that appointments in the militia, the offices of notary public and justice of the peace shall not be considered lucrative; nor shall any person holding any office of honor or profit under any foreign government or under the government of the United States, except postmasters whose annual compensation does not exceed the sum of three hundred dollars, hold any office in either branch of the Legislature or become a member thereof.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1994, ch 1, §§ 1 and 2, rejected Nov. 1994; amendment proposed by SL 1998, ch 1, §§ 1 and 2, accepted Nov. 3, 1998.[3]

Section 4

Text of Section 4:

Disqualification for Conviction of Crime--Defaults on Public Money

No person who has been, or hereafter shall be, convicted of bribery, perjury, or other infamous crime, nor any person who has been, or may be collector or holder of public moneys, who shall not have accounted for and paid over, according to law, all such moneys due from him, shall be eligible to the Legislature or to any office in either branch thereof.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[4]

Section 5

Text of Section 5:

Legislative Reapportionment

The Legislature shall apportion its membership by dividing the state into as many single-member, legislative districts as there are state senators. House districts shall be established wholly within senatorial districts and shall be either single-member or dual-member districts as the Legislature shall determine. Legislative districts shall consist of compact, contiguous territory and shall have population as nearly equal as is practicable, based on the last preceding federal census. An apportionment shall be made by the Legislature in 1983 and in 1991, and every ten years after 1991. Such apportionment shall be accomplished by December first of the year in which the apportionment is required. If any Legislature whose duty it is to make an apportionment shall fail to make the same as herein provided, it shall be the duty of the Supreme Court within ninety days to make such apportionment.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1935, ch 136, approved Nov., 1936; amendment proposed by SL 1937, ch 154, rejected Nov., 1938; amendment proposed by SL 1947, ch 250, approved Nov., 1948; amendment proposed by SL 1949, ch 237, rejected Nov., 1950; amendment proposed by SL 1959, ch 315, rejected Nov. 8, 1960; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1982, ch 1, approved Nov. 2, 1982; amendment proposed by SL 2002, ch 1, § 2; rejected Nov. 5, 2002.[5]

Section 6

Text of Section 6:

Legislative Terms of Office--Compensation

The terms of office of the members of the Legislature shall be two years; they shall receive for their services the salary fixed by law under the provisions of § 2 of article XXI of this Constitution, and five cents for every mile of necessary travel in going to and returning from the place of meeting of the Legislature on the most usual route.

No person may serve more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the senate and more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the house of representatives. However, this restriction does not apply to partial terms to which a legislator may be appointed.

A regular session of the Legislature shall be held each year and shall not exceed forty legislative days, excluding Sundays, holidays and legislative recess, except in cases of impeachment, and members of the Legislature shall receive no other pay or perquisites except salary and mileage.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1891, ch 36, approved Nov., 1892; amendment proposed by SL 1913, ch 129, rejected Nov., 1914; amendment proposed by SL 1961, ch 296, approved Nov. 6, 1962; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1978, ch 3, rejected Nov. 7, 1978; amendment proposed by SL 1980, ch 4, approved Nov. 4, 1980; initiated amendment, approved November 3, 1992; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 3, rejected Nov. 7, 2006; amendment proposed by SL 2008, ch 2, § 2, rejected Nov. 4, 2008; amendment proposed by SL 2008, ch 3, § 2, approved Nov. 4, 2008; amendment proposed by SL 2008, ch 4, § 2, rejected Nov. 4, 2008.[6]

Section 7

Text of Section 7:

Convening of Annual Sessions

The Legislature shall meet at the seat of government on the second Tuesday of January at 12 o'clock m. and at no other time except as provided by this Constitution.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1961, ch 296, approved Nov. 6, 1962; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1978, ch 3, rejected Nov. 7, 1978; amendment proposed by SL 1980, ch 4, approved Nov. 4, 1980; amendment proposed by SL 1982, ch 2, approved Nov. 2, 1982.[7]

Section 8

Text of Section 8:

Oath Required of Legislators and officers--Forfeiture of Office for False Swearing

Members of the Legislature and officers thereof, before they enter upon their official duties, shall take and subscribe the following oath or affirmation: I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the state of South Dakota, and will faithfully discharge the duties of (senator, representative or officer) according to the best of my abilities, and that I have not knowingly or intentionally paid or contributed anything, or made any promise in the nature of a bribe, to directly or indirectly influence any vote at the election at which I was chosen to fill said office, and have not accepted, nor will I accept or receive directly or indirectly, any money, pass, or any other valuable thing, from any corporation, company or person, for any vote or influence I may give or withhold on any bill or resolution, or appropriation, or for any other official act.

This oath shall be administered by a judge of the Supreme or circuit Court, or the presiding officer of either house, in the hall of the house to which the member or officer is elected, and the secretary of state shall record and file the oath subscribed by each member and officer.

Any member or officer of the Legislature who shall refuse to take the oath herein prescribed shall forfeit his office. Any member or officer of the Legislature who shall be convicted of having sworn falsely to, or violated his said oath, shall forfeit his office and be disqualified thereafter from holding the office of senator or member of the house of representatives or any office within the gift of the Legislature.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[8]

Section 9

Text of Section 9:

Each House as Judge of Qualifications--Quorum--Rules of Proceedings--Officers and Employees

Each house shall be the judge of the election returns and qualifications of its own members.

A majority of the members of each house shall constitute a quorum, but a smaller number may adjourn from day-to-day, and may compel the attendance of absent members in such a manner and under such penalty as each house may provide.

Each house shall determine the rules of its proceedings, shall choose its own officers and employees and fix the pay thereof, except as otherwise provided in this Constitution.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[9]

Section 10

Text of Section 10:

Filling Legislative Vacancies

The Governor shall make appointments to fill such vacancies as may occur in either house of the Legislature.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1947, ch 251, approved Nov., 1948; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[10]

Section 11

Text of Section 11:

Legislators' Privilege from Arrest--Freedom of Debate

Senators and representatives shall, in all cases except treason, felony or breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during the session of the Legislature, and in going to and returning from the same; and for words used in any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976[11]

Section 12

Text of Section 12:

Legislators Ineligible for Other Office--Contracts with State or County

No member of the Legislature shall, during the term for which he was elected, be appointed or elected to any civil office in the state which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during the term for which he was elected, nor shall any member receive any civil appointment from the Governor, the Governor and senate, or from the Legislature during the term for which he shall have been elected, and all such appointments and all votes given for any such members for any such office or appointment shall be void; nor shall any member of the Legislature during the term for which he shall have been elected, or within one year thereafter, be interested, directly or indirectly, in any contract with the state or any county thereof, authorized by any law passed during the term for which he shall have been elected.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1989, ch 2, §§ 1 and 2, rejected Nov. 6, 1990; amendment proposed by SL 1997, ch 1, §§ 1 and 2, rejected Nov. 2, 1998.[12]

Section 13

Text of Section 13:

Legislative Journals--Recording of Yeas and Nays

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings and publish the same from time to time, except such parts as require secrecy, and the yeas and nays of members on any question shall be taken at the desire of one-sixth of those present and entered upon the journal.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 4, rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[13]

Section 14

Text of Section 14:

Elections Viva Voce

In all elections to be made by the Legislature the members thereof shall vote viva voce and their votes shall be entered in the journal.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 5 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[14]

Section 15

Text of Section 15:

Open Legislative Sessions--Exception

The sessions of each house and of the committee of the whole shall be open, unless when the business is such as ought to be kept secret.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 6 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[15]

Section 16

Text of Section 16:

Adjournment of Legislative Houses

Neither house shall without the consent of the other adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[16]

Section 17

Text of Section 17:

Reading of Bills

Every bill shall be read twice, by number and title once when introduced, and once upon final passage, but one reading at length may be demanded at any time before final passage.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1945, ch 316, approved Nov., 1946; repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 7 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[17]

Section 18

Text of Section 18:

Enacting Clause--Assent by Majority--Recording of Votes

The enacting clause of a law shall be: "Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of South Dakota" and no law shall be passed unless by assent of a majority of all the members elected to each house of the Legislature. And the question upon the final passage shall be taken upon its last reading, and the yeas and nays shall be entered upon the journal.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[18]

Section 19

Text of Section 19:

Signing of Bills and Resolutions

The presiding officer of each house shall, in the presence of the house over which he presides, sign all bills and joint resolutions passed by the Legislature, after their titles have been publicly read immediately before signing, and the fact of signing shall be entered upon the journal.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[19]

Section 20

Text of Section 20:

Origin of Bills--Amendment in Other House

Any bill may originate in either house of the Legislature, and a bill passed by one house may be amended in the other.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[20]

Section 21

Text of Section 21:

One Subject Expressed in Title

No law shall embrace more than one subject, which shall be expressed in its title.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[21]

Section 22

Text of Section 22:

Effective Date of Acts--Emergency Clause

No act shall take effect until ninety days after the adjournment of the session at which it passed, unless in case of emergency, (to be expressed in the preamble or body of the act) the Legislature shall by a vote of two-thirds of all the members elected of each house, otherwise direct.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[22]

Section 23

Text of Section 23:

Private and Special Laws Prohibited

The Legislature is prohibited from enacting any private or special laws in the following cases:

  1. Granting divorces.
  2. Changing the names of persons or places, or constituting one person the heir at law of another.
  3. Locating or changing county seats.
  4. Regulating county and township affairs.
  5. Incorporating cities, towns and villages or changing or amending the charter of any town, city or village, or laying out, opening, vacating or altering town plats, streets, wards, alleys and public ground.
  6. Providing for sale or mortgage of real estate belonging to minors or others under disability.
  7. Authorizing persons to keep ferries across streams wholly within the state.
  8. Remitting fines, penalties or forfeitures.
  9. Granting to an individual, association or corporation any special or exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise whatever.
  10. Providing for the management of common schools.
  11. Creating, increasing or decreasing fees, percentages or allowances of public officers during the term for which said officers are elected or appointed.

But the Legislature may repeal any existing special law relating to the foregoing subdivisions. In all other cases where a general law can be applicable no special law shall be enacted.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 8 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[23]

Section 24

Text of Section 24:

Release of Debt to State or Municipality

The Legislature shall have no power to release or extinguish, in whole or in part, the indebtedness, liability or obligation of any corporation or individual to this state, or to any municipal corporation therein.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[24]

Section 25

Text of Section 25:

Games of Chance Prohibited--Exceptions

The Legislature shall not authorize any game of chance, lottery, or gift enterprise, under any pretense, or for any purpose whatever provided, however, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law, bona fide veterans, charitable, educational, religious or fraternal organizations, civic and service clubs, volunteer fire departments, or such other public spirited organizations as it may recognize, to conduct games of chance when the entire net proceeds of such games of chance are to be devoted to educational, charitable, patriotic, religious, or other public spirited uses. However, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law a state lottery or video games of chance, or both, which are regulated by the state of South Dakota, either separately by the state or jointly with one or more states, and which are owned and operated by the state of South Dakota, either separately by the state or jointly with one or more states or persons, provided any such video games of chance shall not directly dispense coins or tokens. However, the Legislature shall not expand the statutory authority existing as of June 1, 1994, regarding any private ownership of state lottery games or video games of chance, or both. The Legislature shall establish the portion of proceeds due the state from such lottery or video games of chance, or both, and the purposes for which those proceeds are to be used. SDCL 42-7A, and its amendments, regulations, and related laws, and all acts and contracts relying for authority upon such laws and regulations, beginning July 1, 1987, to the effective date of this amendment, are ratified and approved. Further, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law, limited card games and slot machines within the city limits of Deadwood, provided that 60% of the voters of the City of Deadwood approve legislatively authorized card games and slot machines at an election called for such purpose. The entire net Municipal proceeds of such card games and slot machines shall be devoted to the Historic Restoration and Preservation of Deadwood.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1970, ch 1, approved Nov. 3, 1970; amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 1982, ch 3, rejected Nov. 2, 1982; amendment proposed by SL 1986, ch 2, approved Nov. 4, 1986; initiated amendment, approved November 8, 1988; amendment proposed by 1st SS 1994, ch 1, approved Nov. 8, 1994; amendment proposed by initiated amendment, rejected Nov. 7, 2000.[25]

Section 26

Text of Section 26:

Municipal Powers Denied to Private Organizations

The Legislature shall not delegate to any special commission, private corporation or association, any power to make, supervise or interfere with any municipal improvement, money, property, effects, whether held in trust or otherwise, or levy taxes, or to select a capital site, or to perform any municipal functions whatever.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1976, ch 2, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[26]

Section 27

Text of Section 27:

Suits Against the State

The Legislature shall direct by law in what manner and in what courts suits may be brought against the state.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; amendment proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[27]

Section 28

Text of Section 28:

Bribery and Corrupt Solicitation of Officers--Compelling Testimony--Immunity from Prosecution

Any person who shall give, demand, offer, directly or indirectly, any money, testimonial, privilege or personal advantage, thing of value to any executive or judicial officer or member of the Legislature, to influence him in the performance of any of his official or public duties, shall be guilty of bribery and shall be punished in such manner as shall be provided by law.

The offense of corrupt solicitation of members of the Legislature, or of public officers of the state, or any municipal division thereof, and any effort towards solicitation of said members of the Legislature, or officers to influence their official actions shall be defined by law, and shall be punishable by fine and imprisonment. Any person may be compelled to testify in investigation or judicial proceedings against any person charged with having committed any offense of bribery or corrupt solicitation, and shall not be permitted to withhold his testimony upon the ground that it may criminate himself, but said testimony shall not afterwards be used against him in any judicial proceeding except for bribery in giving such testimony, and any person convicted of either of the offenses aforesaid shall be disqualified from holding any office or position or office of trust or profit in this state.

History: Repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repealed proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976.[28]

Section 29

Text of Section 29:

Legislative Powers in Emergency from Enemy Attack

Notwithstanding any general or special provisions of the Constitution, in order to insure continuity of state and local governmental operations in periods of emergency resulting from disasters caused by enemy attack, the Legislature shall have the power and the immediate duty (1) to provide for prompt and temporary succession to the powers and duties of public offices, of whatever nature and whether filled by election or appointment, the incumbents of which may become unavailable for carrying on the powers and duties of such offices, and (2) to adopt such other measures as may be necessary and proper for insuring the continuity of governmental operations. In the exercise of the powers hereby conferred the Legislature shall in all respects conform to the requirements of this Constitution except to the extent that in the judgment of the Legislature so to do would be impracticable or would admit of undue delay.

History: Section proposed by SL 1959, ch 317, adopted Nov. 8, 1960; repeal proposed by SL 1974, ch 1, rejected Nov. 5, 1974; repeal proposed by SL 1975, ch 2, as amended by SL 1976, ch 1, rejected Nov. 2, 1976; amendment proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 9 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[29]

Section 30

Text of Section 30:

Power of Committee of Legislature to Suspend Administrative Rules and Regulations

The Legislature may by law empower a committee comprised of members of both houses of the Legislature, acting during recesses or between sessions, to suspend rules and regulations promulgated by any administrative department or agency from going into effect until July 1 after the Legislature reconvenes.

History: Section proposed by SL 1980, ch 4, approved Nov. 4, 1980.[30]

Section 31

Text of Section 31:

Convening of Special Sessions upon Petition

In addition to the provisions of Article IV, § 3, the Legislature may be convened in special session by the presiding officers of both houses upon the written request of two-thirds of the members of each house. The petition of request shall state the purposes of the session, and only business encompassed by those purposes may be transacted.

History: Amendment proposed by SL 1990, ch 2, approved November 6, 1990.[31]

Section 32

Text of Section 32:

Term Limitations for United States Congressmen

Commencing with the 1992 election, no person may be elected to more than two consecutive terms in the United States senate or more than six consecutive terms in the United States house of representatives.

History: Initiated amendment, approved November 3, 1992; repeal proposed by SL 2006, ch 1, § 10 rejected Nov. 7, 2006.[32]

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