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Article VI, Florida Constitution

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Florida Constitution
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Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXII
Article VI of the Florida Constitution is labeled Suffrage and Elections. It has seven sections.

Section 1

Text of Section 1:

Regulation of Elections

All elections by the people shall be by direct and secret vote. General elections shall be determined by a plurality of votes cast. Registration and elections shall, and political party functions may, be regulated by law; however, the requirements for a candidate with no party affiliation or for a candidate of a minor party for placement of the candidate's name on the ballot shall be no greater than the requirements for a candidate of the party having the largest number of registered voters.[1]

Amendments

Section 2

Text of Section 2:

Electors

Every citizen of the United States who is at least eighteen years of age and who is a permanent resident of the state, if registered as provided by law, shall be an elector of the county where registered.[1]

Amendments

Section 3

Text of Section 3:

Oath

Each eligible citizen upon registering shall subscribe the following: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will protect and defend the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Florida, and that I am qualified to register as an elector under the Constitution and laws of the State of Florida."[1]

Section 4

Text of Section 4:

Disqualifications

(a) No person convicted of a felony, or adjudicated in this or any other state to be mentally incompetent, shall be qualified to vote or hold office until restoration of civil rights or removal of disability.

(b) No person may appear on the ballot for re-election to any of the following offices:

(1) Florida representative,

(2) Florida senator,

(3) Florida Lieutenant governor,

(4) any office of the Florida cabinet,

(5) U.S. Representative from Florida, or

(6) U.S. Senator from Florida

if, by the end of the current term of office, the person will have served (or, but for resignation, would have served) in that office for eight consecutive years.[1]

Amendments

Section 5

Text of Section 5:

Primary, General, and Special Elections

(a) A general election shall be held in each county on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of each even-numbered year to choose a successor to each elective state and county officer whose term will expire before the next general election and, except as provided herein, to fill each vacancy in elective office for the unexpired portion of the term. A general election may be suspended or delayed due to a state of emergency or impending emergency pursuant to general law. Special elections and referenda shall be held as provided by law.

(b) If all candidates for an office have the same party affiliation and the winner will have no opposition in the general election, all qualified electors, regardless of party affiliation, may vote in the primary elections for that office.[1]

Amendments

Section 6

Text of Section 6:

Municipal and District Elections

Registration and elections in municipalities shall, and in other governmental entities created by statute may, be provided by law.[1]

Section 7

Text of Section 7:

Campaign Spending Limits and Funding of Campaigns for Elective State-Wide Office

It is the policy of this state to provide for state-wide elections in which all qualified candidates may compete effectively. A method of public financing for campaigns for state-wide office shall be established by law. Spending limits shall be established for such campaigns for candidates who use public funds in their campaigns. The legislature shall provide funding for this provision. General law implementing this paragraph shall be at least as protective of effective competition by a candidate who uses public funds as the general law in effect on January 1, 1998.[1]

Amendments

See also

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External links

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References