Atlanta Journal v. Hill

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Atlanta Journalvs.Hill
Number: 257 Ga. 398
Year: 1987
State: Georgia
Court: {{{Court}}}
Other lawsuits in Georgia
Other lawsuits in 1987
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Atlanta Journal v. Hill was a case before the Georgia Supreme Court in 1987 concerning open meetings laws and their application to municipalities.


Background

Atlanta Journal v. Hill, 257 Ga. 398 (1987) (Hunt, J.): Suit for access to meetings of the Administrative Review Panel appointed by Mayor Young to conduct a review of actions taken by City officials in response to Alice Bond's allegations. The Court declared for the first time that "the Act must be broadly construed to effect its remedial and protective purposes," which the Court described as follows: "We note that the Act was enacted in the public interest to protect the public - both individuals and the public generally - from 'closed door' politics and the potential abuse of individuals and the misuse of power such policies entail." However, the Court held that the Act does not cover groups which although they function on behalf of government have no official authority. The Court held that the Administrative Review Panel had no such authority, despite its purported subpoena powers, because the delegation to it of subpoena powers was unconstitutional. Justice Marshall concurred specially, writing that the Open Meetings Act does not apply to advisory committees. [Note that the Act has since been amended to expressly include agency committees.] Justice Gregory concurred in the judgment only.[1]

See also

References

  1. Synopsis of Georgia Open Meetings Act Cases