Austin, Texas municipal elections, 2014

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2015


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The city of Austin, Texas held nonpartisan elections for mayor and city council on November 4, 2014. The candidate filing deadline was August 18, 2014. A runoff election took place on December 16. Ten city council seats were up election.[1]

As a result of redistricting and new term limits in 2012, every race in Austin's 2014 municipal elections was for an open seat.

Races that were decided in the general election on November 4 include districts 2, 5 and 9. All other races - including the mayoral race - advanced to the runoff elections on December 16, 2014.

Transportation, affordability and water were some of the key issues that shaped Austin's 2014 election cycle.

Redistricting, election dates and term limits

In November 2012, the citizens of Austin voted in favor of three propositions (1, 2 and 3) that functioned to reshape the city's electoral process. Previously, Austin featured a city council with a total of seven seats, including the mayor. All were elected at-large and served a maximum of three, three-year terms. Elections were held in May of uneven years.

Collectively, Propositions 1, 2 and 3 altered this arrangement by creating four new seats; establishing ten districts within the city, each of which will elect its own city council representative; moving elections to November of even years (to coincide with state and federal elections); and setting council and mayoral term limits to two, four-year staggered terms. The mayor will still serve on the council as its eleventh member.[2][3]

For more information, see here

Impact on the 2014 Elections

One of the most significant consequences of the success of Propositions 1, 2 and 3 for Austin's 2014 election cycle was that only two city council incumbents were eligible to seek re-election in 2014 (due to the new term limits). These were Chris Riley and Kathie Tovo. Both sought the District 9 seat. Mayor Lee Leffingwell was also ineligible for re-election.

After the 2014 elections, incoming council members were divided into two groups by lot. The members of group one will serve four-year terms, while the members of group two will serve two-year terms and run for re-election in 2016. The winners of the 2016 election will then serve full four-year terms.[4][5]

Mayor

Candidate list

Note: Due to term limits, incumbent Lee Leffingwell was ineligible for re-election.

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

Election results

Mayor of Austin Runoff Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngStephen Adler 67% 52,159
Mike Martinez 33% 25,639
Total Votes 77,798
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Mayor of Austin General Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMike Martinez 29.6% 51,892
Green check mark transparent.pngStephen Adler 36.8% 64,416
Sheryl Cole 14.8% 25,846
Ronald J. Culver 0.8% 1,358
Mary Krenek 4.2% 7,370
David M. Orshalick 2.1% 3,746
Todd H. Phelps 9.9% 17,333
Randall F. Stephens 1.8% 3,204
Total Votes 175,165
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results

City council

Candidate list

District 1

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 2

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

District 3

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 4

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 5

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

District 6

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 7

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 8

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

District 9

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

Note: Chris Riley withdrew from the District 9 race on November 7, 2014.[6]

District 10

November 4, 2014, General election candidates:

December 16, 2014, Runoff election candidates:

Election results

[edit]

Austin City Council, District 1, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngOra Houston 74.3% 4,241
DeWayne Lofton 25.7% 1,469
Total Votes 5,710
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 3, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSabino "Pio" Renteria 59.7% 2,558
Susana Almanza 40.3% 1,724
Total Votes 4,282
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 4, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Casar 64.6% 2,854
Laura Pressley 35.4% 1,563
Total Votes 4,417
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 6, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDonald S. Zimmerman 51.2% 4,012
James T. Flannigan 48.8% 3,821
Total Votes 7,833
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 7, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngLeslie Pool 66.2% 5,270
Jeb Boyt 33.8% 2,686
Total Votes 7,956
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 8, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngEllen Troxclair 50.2% 6,234
Edward S. Scruggs 49.8% 6,178
Total Votes 12,412
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results
Austin City Council, District 10, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSheri P. Gallo 54.7% 8,927
Mandy Dealey 45.3% 7,380
Total Votes 16,307
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Runoff Election Results

Austin City Council, District 1, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngOra Houston 49.1% 6,429
Green check mark transparent.pngDeWayne Lofton 14.4% 1,887
Andrew Bucknall 6.2% 811
Michael D. Cargill 5.4% 711
George W. Hindman 7.1% 928
Christopher J. Hutchins 3.2% 421
Norman A. Jacobson 1.2% 153
Valerie M. Menard 9.3% 1,221
Samuel A. Osemene 4% 529
Total Votes 13,090
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 2, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDelia Garza 65.8% 5,576
Edward A. Reyes 15.6% 1,325
John C. Sheppard 10.5% 887
Mike Owen 8.1% 691
Total Votes 8,479
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 3, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSusana Almanza 21% 2,142
Green check mark transparent.pngSabino "Pio" Renteria 18.8% 1,919
Mario Cantu 9.7% 993
Julian Limon Fernandez 5% 510
Christopher L. Hoerster 1.6% 163
Shaun D. Ireland 6.3% 646
Fred McGhee 4.5% 462
Kent K. Phillips 6% 615
Jose Quintero 2.2% 223
Eric J. Rangel 6.3% 648
Ricardo Turullols-Bonilla 2% 201
Jose A. Valera 16.5% 1,683
Total Votes 10,205
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 4, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Casar 38.6% 3,272
Green check mark transparent.pngLaura Pressley 21.6% 1,826
Katrina M. Daniel 16.2% 1,369
Monica A. Guzman 6.6% 556
Louis C. Herrin III 2.6% 224
Marco Mancillas 0.9% 77
Sharon E. Mays 8.5% 720
Roberto Perez, Jr. 5% 426
Total Votes 8,470
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 5, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAnn Kitchen 53.6% 11,396
Daniel Buda 9% 1,923
Jason R. Denny 4.1% 875
William David Floyd 4.8% 1,016
CarolAnneRose Kennedy 3.9% 835
Luis M. Rodriguez 22.2% 4,719
David C. Senecal 2.3% 488
Total Votes 21,252
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 6, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJames T. Flannigan 24% 3,702
Green check mark transparent.pngDonald S. Zimmerman 24.2% 3,729
Mackenzie Kelly 9% 1,382
Lloyd "Pete" Phillips Jr. 4.6% 704
Matt Stillwell 15.4% 2,366
Jay Wiley 22.8% 3,513
Total Votes 15,396
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 7, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Boyt 16.9% 3,299
Green check mark transparent.pngLeslie Pool 32.1% 6,275
Ed English 13.8% 2,701
Zachary R. Ingraham 3.1% 612
James A. Paver 10.8% 2,107
Pete Salazar, Jr. 5.9% 1,148
Darryl R. Wittle 2.2% 429
Melissa A. Zone 15.1% 2,951
Total Votes 19,522
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 8, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngEllen Troxclair 26.4% 5,682
Green check mark transparent.pngEdward S. Scruggs 25.6% 5,503
Rebecca A. Bray 19.1% 4,108
Darrell Pierce 16.5% 3,549
Eliza May 12.5% 2,696
Total Votes 21,538
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 9, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngKathie Tovo 49.1% 10,041
Green check mark transparent.pngChris Riley 40.4% 8,258
Erin K. McGann 10.5% 2,149
Total Votes 20,448
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results
Austin City Council, District 10, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngMandy Dealey 30.7% 8,566
Green check mark transparent.pngSheri P. Gallo 22.9% 6,403
Margie Burciaga 4.6% 1,298
Tina Cannon 3.8% 1,072
Matthew L. Lamon 3.1% 877
Jason W. Meeker 6.3% 1,769
Robert D. Thomas 18.9% 5,276
Bill Worsham 9.5% 2,666
Total Votes 27,927
Source: Travis County Clerk - 2014 Official Election Results

Issues

As Austin's 2014 election took shape, several major issues emerged. Below, Ballotpedia highlights what they were and how they shaped Austin's 2014 municipal elections.

Transportation

A particularly divisive issue was transportation. In June 2014, the Austin City Council voted in favor of a $1 billion transportation project that focused on improving roads and highways and constructing an almost ten-mile long rail system that will run through the city.[7] Experts described the project as one designed to satisfy both supporters of a rail system and supporters of rehabilitating the city's already existing transportation infrastructure. Austinites got a chance to weigh in on the plan in November, when it appeared on the ballot as "Proposition 1."[8][9]

Affordability

Another divisive issue was affordability, especially as it relates to buying and owning a home. In 2013, the Austin Business Journal reported that housing prices in Austin were quickly outpacing median incomes and the ability of most Austinites to secure home loans.[10] To address this problem, mayoral candidate Stephen Adler proposed a 20-percent homestead tax exemption, which, according to Adler, could save homeowners up to $190 per year. Mike Martinez sharply criticized Adler's proposal, saying that it would only benefit the wealthy and could raise costs for renters. The latter point was also made by Todd H. Phelps.[11] Martinez suggested that he would prefer to cut down on city fees and offer homeowners flat rate tax exemptions instead.[12]

Water

A third issue that shaped Austin's 2014 election cycle was water. Austin, a city with almost one million residents, gets the majority of its potable water from a constellation of freshwater reservoirs in central Texas called the Highland Lakes. As a result of a prolonged drought throughout much of 2013 and 2014, however, the water levels in these reservoirs began to reach record lows in the months leading up to the election, which prompted concerns amongst city and state officials over the future of Austin's access to potable water.[13][14] Consequently, many of Austin's mayoral and city council candidates made water a central component of their 2014 campaign platforms.

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See also

External links

References