Ballot access requirements for political candidates in California

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See also
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of California. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in California. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

California uses a top-two primary system. This system establishes a single primary election for all candidates running for office and open to all registered voters. The top two vote-getters in this primary election then move on to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. The system was established with the Top Two Primaries Act, which appeared as Proposition 14 on the June 8, 2010 ballot. It was approved with 53.8 percent of the vote and took effect with a special election on April 19, 2011.[1]

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: California elections, 2014

California had a primary election on June 3, 2014. The general election will take place on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

Because California has a top-two primary system, only the top two candidates who earn the most votes in the primary election will advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation.

The 2014 filing deadline for candidates was March 7, 2014, unless a candidate submitted signatures in lieu of paying a filing fee. The deadline to turn in those signatures was February 20, 2014. The filing deadline for a write-in candidate was May 20, 2014.[2] The deadline to qualify as a political party in time for the 2014 elections was January 19, 2014.[3] These deadlines are included with campaign finance deadlines in the table below.[4][5]

Legend:      Ballot Access     Campaign Finance     Election Date




Dates and Requirements for Candidates in 2014
Deadline Event Type Event Description
January 19, 2014 Ballot Access Deadline for new political parties to be certified by the state of California
January 31, 2014 Campaign Finance Semi-annual Statement due
February 20, 2014 Ballot Access Deadline for candidates to file signatures in lieu of a filing fee
March 7, 2014 Ballot Access Candidate filing deadline if paying fee for ballot access
March 24, 2014 Campaign Finance Pre-election Report due
May 20, 2014 Ballot Access Filing deadline for write-in candidates
May 22, 2014 Campaign Finance Pre-election Report due
June 3, 2014 Election Date State Primary Date
July 31, 2014 Campaign Finance Semi-annual Statement due
October 6, 2014 Campaign Finance Pre-election Report due
October 23, 2014 Campaign Finance Pre-election Report due
November 4, 2014 Election Date General election
February 2, 2014 Campaign Finance Semi-annual Statement due

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of December 2013, the state of California officially recognizes six political parties.[6] In order to be recognized by the state, a political party must fulfill certain requirements, which are outlined below in "Process to establish a political party."

Party Website link By-laws/Platform link
American Independent Party Official party website Party platform
Americans Elect Party National party website
Democratic Party Official party website Party by-laws
Green Party Official party website Party by-laws
Libertarian Party Official party website Party by-laws
Peace and Freedom Party Official party website Party by-laws
Republican Party Official party website Party by-laws

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. California[7] does not allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[8]

Events

Americans Elect Party 2014

One of the initial stages of qualifying as a political party in California is to have 1/15 of one percent of registered voters affiliate with the party. At the December 31, 2013 deadline, the Americans Elect Party did not have enough registered voters. Approximately 12,000 voters are needed to affiliate in order to maintain status as a political party, but the Americans Elect Party had only about 5,000.[9] Instead of revoking the Americans Elect Party's status, the California Secretary of State ruled that the party was still ballot-qualified through the November 2014 general election. The Secretary of State's Office explained that no party can lose their status unless it is the beginning of a presidential election year, so the Americans Elect Party has two more years to bring up their voter registration.[10]

Top Two Primaries Act

See also: California Proposition 14, Top Two Primaries Act (June 2010)

California has a top-two primary system. This system establishes a single primary election for all candidates running for office, which is open to all registered voters. The top two vote-getters in this primary election then move on to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. This system was established with the Top Two Primaries Act, which appeared as Proposition 14 on the June 8, 2010 ballot. It was approved with 53.8 percent of the vote and took effect with a special election on April 19, 2011.[11]

Support

Prior to the top-two primary system, the top candidate in each party advanced to the general election, even if other candidates received more votes. Supporters of the new system believed it would reduce the number of pointless runoff elections and give strong candidates within the same party as another strong candidate a chance to run in the general election.[12] Supporters also thought it would reduce partisanship and legislative gridlock by putting more moderate politicians in office and freeing candidates to position themselves on issues that are favorable for their districts, whether or not their party agrees.[13][14]

Opposition

Opponents to the law thought the top-two primary system would limit voter choice and eliminate third parties.[15] Opponents also believed it would raise the cost of administering elections as registration cards, candidate lists and nomination papers would have to be redesigned.[16] Another concern was that campaign costs would increase, as it would make political parties run two separate election campaigns for the primary election, rather than the single campaign they used to run, in hopes that both their candidates would advance to the general election.[17]

On July 29, 2010 a lawsuit was filed against the Top Two Primaries Act challenging provisions that prohibited write-in votes to be counted in a runoff election and limited candidates' ability to define their party affiliation on the ballot. The plaintiffs also asked the court to block enforcement of the law until those provisions were removed.[18] The California Supreme Court declined to block the enforcement of the law on December 15, 2010 but did not rule on the provisions. The lawsuit then moved to the appeals court in San Francisco, where it is still pending.[19]

Post-implementation updates

Because of different ballot qualifications implemented with the top-two primary system, minor parties say they are finding it harder to get their candidates on the ballot. Under these new qualifications, minor party candidates must collect 10,000 signatures to waive a filing fee equal to two percent of the first year's salary for state offices or one percent for members of Congress. Prior to implementing the top-two system, the number of signatures required to waive that fee was 150, so most minor parties opted to file petitions. In 2012, minor parties put 21 candidates on the ballot in California. For the 10 years prior to that election, they averaged a combined 133 candidates on the ballot.[20] Additionally, in the 86 elections for federal or state office in which a minor party did place a candidate on the primary ballot against at least two major party candidates in a top-two primary system, no minor party candidate has placed first or second in order to move on to the general election.[21] The Green, Libertarian and Peace and Freedom Parties have joined together in a lawsuit trying to overturn the top-two primary system in California.[20]

One of the desired impacts of the top-two primary system was to promote more moderate candidates. According to Global Strategy Group, a polling and public relations firm that conducts research on public policy, that impact has not come to fruition. One of the reasons for this is low voter turnout at the primary elections, especially among Democratic voters. Though the Democratic Party accounts for 44 percent of registered voters statewide compared to the Republican Party's 29 percent, in many districts where Democrats hold the majority, elections have been won by very small margins or even been lost to a Republican candidate. Because of the higher Republican voter turnout, Democrats must often fight for a single spot in the general election, and those with close ties to the party establishment and who stick close to party orthodoxy often gain greater support and thus have the advantage in the primary over other, more moderate candidates within the party.[22]

Another byproduct of the top-two primary system is the emergence of "sham" candidate accusations. Jeffrey Wald, a member of the Alameda County, California, Republican Central Committee, filed a lawsuit on March 24, 2014, charging that two Republican candidates entered the race for a congressional seat in order to split the Republican vote so no candidate in the party would be able to move on to the general election. "Sham" candidates would have no effect on a party's front-runner if California did not have a top-two primary system.[23]

Alex Padilla (D) and Leland Yee (D), two state senators who are both running for California Secretary of State in 2014, have expressed concerns about ballot access limitations for minor parties under the top-two primary system. Senator Yee opposed the top-two system since it was originally proposed on the ballot, and Senator Padilla said his office is looking into legislative solutions. Michael Feinstein, spokesperson for the California Green Party, said they would welcome any legislation that would seek to address ballot access problems for minor parties.[24]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: California Elections Code Section 5000-5006

The process to qualify as an officially recognized political party in California is outlined below.

  • The group wishing to qualify must hold a convention or caucus to elect officers and determine the party name.[3][25]
  • After the convention, the group must file with the Office of the California Secretary of State and qualify in one of two ways:[3][25]
    • Voter registration method
      • To qualify by voter registration, one percent of persons who participated in the last gubernatorial election must acknowledge a preference for the group by writing the chosen name of the group on an affidavit of registration. These affidavits must be submitted to county elections offices where the voters live 154 days before the primary election. The Secretary of State's Office will then determine if the group has qualified as a party no later than 135 days before the primary election.[3][25]
    • Petition method
      • To qualify by petition, signatures of registered voters equaling 10 percent of the votes cast in the last gubernatorial election must be collected and filed at the home county election offices of the voters 135 days prior to the primary election.[3][25]
  • Once a political party qualifies, it must retain 1/15 of one percent of the state's total registration of voters in order to maintain its status as an officially recognized political party. It must also have a statewide candidate earn at least two percent of the entire vote in an election or keep one percent of statewide registration in a gubernatorial race.[3][25] For an example of the number of votes and voter registrations this requires, look to the table below.
Registered voters as of February 2013 Number needed to designate party preference to initially maintain status Total registered voters in 2010 gubernatorial race Number needed to designate party preference to officially maintain status Votes case in 2010 gubernatorial race Number needed to vote for candidate to officially maintain status
18,055,783[26] Just over 12,000 23,551,699[27] 471,033 10,302,324[28] 103,023

Process to become a candidate

Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states, including California, elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Section 8020-8028 and Section 8100-8107 of the California Elections Code

  • Before accepting or spending any money related to campaigning for office, candidates must file a Candidate Intention Statement with the Secretary of State's Political Reform Division.[29][30]
  • Candidates may qualify to run for office in one of two ways:[29]
    • Qualifying by payment of fee
      • Candidates pay a filing fee made payable to the California Secretary of State to their home county's elections official when they pick up their nomination forms.[29][31]
      • The filing fee for candidates seeking the office of United States Senator or a state executive office, such as Governor or Treasurer, is two percent of the first year's salary of that office.[31]
      • The filing fee for candidates seeking the office of United States Representative, State Senator or Member of the Assembly is one percent of the first year's salary of that office.[31]
    • Qualifying by petition in lieu of filing fee
      • Instead of paying a filing fee, candidates may collect signatures of registered voters on an in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition. Signatures may be collected to cover all or any prorated portion of the filing fee.[29] No process or timeline for challenging petitions is designated in the California Elections Code.
      • Candidates seeking the office of Member of the Assembly must file 1,500 signatures of registered voters. Those seeking the office of State Senator or United States Representative must file 3,000 signatures of registered voters, and those seeking statewide office must file 10,000 signatures of registered voters.[31]
      • For all other offices requiring a filing fee, if the number of registered voters in the district in which the candidate seeks nomination is 2,000 or more, the candidate may submit a petition containing four signatures of registered voters for each dollar of the filing fee, or 10 percent of the total of registered voters in the district in which he or she seeks nomination, whichever is less.[31]
      • If the number of registered voters in the district the candidate seeks nomination is less than 2,000, a candidate may submit a petition containing four signatures of registered voters for each dollar of the filing fee, or 20 percent of the total of registered voters in the district in which he or she seeks nomination, whichever is less.[31]
      • Completed petitions must be submitted 15 days before the end of the qualifying period to the counties in which the signers reside.[31]
  • In addition to the Candidate Intention Statement, candidates are required to file nomination forms with their home county. These forms may be picked up as early as the 113th day prior to the primary election but must be filed no later than the 88th day prior to the primary election.[32][33] Nomination forms include: a Statement of Economic Interests, a Declaration of Candidacy and nomination papers.[29] Nomination papers require a certain number of registered voters' signatures, depending on the office sought. If a candidate qualifies by submitting an in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition, the signatures on that petition will be counted towards the requirement for the nomination paper.[34] Registered voters may sign both the in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition and the nomination paper, unless the candidate is using the signatures on the in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition to count towards the nomination paper requirement. If that is the case, a registered voter can sign only one of the documents.[31] The number of signatures required for the nomination paper are as follows:[35]
    • 65-100 for candidates seeking the office of United States Senator or a state executive office
    • 40-60 for candidates seeking the office of United States Representative, State Senator or Member of the Assembly
  • If the candidate is running as a write-in, the only nomination forms required are the nomination papers and a Statement of Write-in Candidacy, which should be filed with his or her home county.[29]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain ballot access. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in California.

In California, candidates must pay a filing fee to get on the ballot. In cases where the candidate does not have the resources to pay such a fee or does not want to, petitions can be used instead. On these petitions, called in-lieu-of-filing-fee petitions, candidates may collect signatures of registered voters. The number of signatures required depends on the office sought. Candidates may collect enough signatures to cover the entire filing fee or any prorated portion of it.[36] Petitions are also used for nomination papers. Each candidate, whether submitting an in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition or not, must submit nominating papers containing a certain number of signatures depending on the office sought. Signatures on in-lieu-of-filing-fee petitions can be counted toward the nomination paper requirement.[34]

To collect signatures for these petitions, candidates may use circulators, individuals 18 years old or older who physically go out among voters on the candidate's behalf to witness the signing of the petition. Circulators are governed by Section 100-106 of the California Elections Code. When a petition is filed with an elections official, each section of it must be accompanied by a signed statement from the circulator declaring the name and address of the circulator and the dates between which all signatures were collected. The circulator must also declare that he or she circulated the petition, witnessed each signature, believes to the best of his or her knowledge that each signature is genuine and belongs to the person it purports to, and that both the petition and accompanied declaration are true and correct. Both the candidate and the circulator are allowed to sign the petition, as long as they are registered voters in the district corresponding to the office the candidate seeks.[37]

Campaign finance

Figure 1: This is the Officeholder and Candidate Campaign Statement—Short Form (Form 470).

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: California Government Code, Section 85200-85201

Candidates seeking a federal office must file with the Federal Election Commission. Reporting details for federal candidates are not included in this section. Candidates seeking a state office should file all campaign finance documents with the California Secretary of State Political Reform Division.[38]

Reporting requirements

Before raising or spending any money related to their campaign, including personal funds, candidates must file a Candidate Intention Statement (Form 501).[38][30]

If $1,000 or more is raised or spent for the campaign a Statement of Organization (Form 410) and Recipient Committee Campaign Statements (Form 460) must be filed. Candidates must also open a separate bank account for campaign funds.[38][30]

  • Statement of Organization (Form 410):[38]
    • Designates a committee that will be in charge of the candidate’s campaign finances. The candidate must set up a new committee every election, even in the case of re-election.
    • Must be filed within 10 days of raising or spending $1,000.
    • A committee that qualifies during the last 16 days before the election must file the Statement of Organization within 24 hours of qualifying. It must be filed by fax, guaranteed overnight delivery, or personal delivery.
  • Recipient Committee Campaign Statements (Form 460) are filed throughout the election year.[39]
    • Semi-annual Statements are due January 31 and July 31. The statement due January 31 covers financial activity from July 1 through December 31 of the year previous, and the statement due July 31 covers financial activity from January 1 through June 30. These statements are due after a committee has been organized. A committee formed after January 1 is not required to file a statement covering any part of the year previous.
    • Pre-election Statements are filed before the election in which the candidate is listed on the ballot. There are two of these covering financial activity prior to both the primary and general elections. Candidates who do not appear on the ballot because they are running unopposed are not required to file pre-election statements. Committees of a candidate who lost in the primary election are only required to file pre-election statements for the general election if the committee makes contributions or independent expenditures to support or oppose another candidate, committee, or ballot measure during the period covered by the statement.
    • The original statements must be filed with the California Secretary of State, but copies of these must also be filed with the Registrar-Recorder of Los Angeles County, the Elections Department in San Francisco, and the candidate's home county if different from Los Angeles County if the candidate is running for state executive office, and with the county with the largest number of voters in the candidate's district and with the candidate's home county if different than the largest voter district if the candidate is running for state legislative office.

If less than $1,000 is raised or spent on the campaign in a calendar year, not including personal funds used to pay filing fees an Officeholder/Candidate Campaign Statement—Short Form (Form 470) must be filed once a year as long as funds for the campaign remain under $1,000.[38][30]

  • The deadline for this form is the same as the deadline for the first semi-annual statement or the first pre-election statement, whichever occurs first.
  • On top of filing with the Political Reform Division, a copy of the Officeholder/Candidate Campaign Statement--Short Form (Form 470) must be filed with additional offices depending on the office sought.
    • Candidates for state executive office, such as Governor or Treasurer, must file a copy with the Registrar-Recorder of Los Angeles County, the Elections Department in San Francisco, and the candidate's home county if different from Los Angeles County or San Francisco.
    • Candidates running for state legislative office must file a copy with the county with the largest number of voters in the candidate's district and with the candidate's home county if different than the largest voter district.

If a candidate’s committee receives contributions or makes expenditures totaling $50,000 or more, the committee is required to file all Recipient Committee Campaign Statements electronically. After reaching that $50,000 threshold, candidates must also file Election Cycle Reports and $5,000 Reports.[39]

  • Election Cycle Reports must be filed electronically if a candidate's committee receives a contribution of $1,000 or more from a single contributor during the 90-day election cycle. These reports are due within 24 hours of receiving such a contribution.[39]
  • $5,000 Reports must be filed electronically if a candidate's committee receives a contribution of $5,000 or more from a single contributor, including a small contributor committee, at any time other than during an election cycle. These reports must be filed within 10 days of receiving such a contribution.[39]

Contribution limits

In addition to campaign finance reports, candidates are also subject to fundraising limits for each election, including the following:[40]

  • Candidates seeking office in the California State Senate or the California State Assembly can accept no more than $4,100 from an individual, business entity or PAC and no more than $8,200 from a small contributor committee.
  • Candidates seeking state executive office, other than Governor, can accept no more than $6,800 from an individual, business entity or PAC and no more than $13,600 from a small contributor committee.
  • Candidates seeking the office of Governor of California can accept no more than $27,200 from an individual, business entity, PAC or small contributor committee.
  • Officially recognized political parties do not have contribution limits.

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

Secretary of State:

Why: Oversees candidate filing and reporting and all election procedures.
1500 - 11th Street, 5th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814
Telephone: (916) 657-2166
Fax: (916) 653-3214
http://www.sos.ca.gov/

Fair Political Practices Commission:

Why: Issue opinions, adopts regulations and investigates violations in regards to the Political Reform Act.
428 J Street, Room 450
Sacramento, CA 95814
Telephone: (916) 322-5660
Fax: (916) 322-3711
Fax-On-Demand: 1-888-622-1151
Email: advice@fppc.ca.gov
http://www.fppc.ca.gov/

Counties

See also: Counties in California

Candidates must file a number of documents with the county elections office in the county they reside in. Individual county contact information can be found below.

California County Contact Information
County Email Phone Secondary Phone Fax Website Physical Address Mailing Address
Alameda County (510) 272-6933 (510) 272-6982 link 1225 Fallon Street, Room G-1, Oakland, CA 94612
Alpine County coclerk@alpinecountyca.com 530-694-2281 (530) 694-2491 link 99 Water (Federal Express Only), Markleeville, CA 96120 P.O. Box 158, Markleeville, CA 96120
Amador County Elections@amadorgov.org (209) 223-6465 (209) 223-6467 link 810 Court Street, Jackson, CA 95642-2132
Butte County elections@buttecounty.net (530) 538-7761 (800) 894-7761 (Butte County Only) (530) 538-6853 link 25 County Center Drive, Suite 110, Orovilled, CA 95964-3361
Calaveras County elections@co.calaveras.ca.us (209) 754-6376 (209) 754-6733 link 891 Mountain Ranch Road, San Andreas, CA 95249
Colusa County ccclerk@countyofcolusa.org (530) 458-0500 (530) 458-0512 link 546 Jay Street, Suite 200, Colusa, CA 95932
Contra Costa County candidate.services@vote.cccounty.us (925) 335-7800 (877) 335-7802 (Domestic) (925) 335-7842 link 555 Escobar Street, Martinez, CA 94553 P.O. Box 271, Martinez, CA 94553
Del Norte County anorthrup@co.del-norte.ca.us 707-464-7216 (707) 465-0383 (707) 465-0321 link 981 H Street, Room 160, Crescent City, CA 95531
El Dorado County elections@edcgov.us (530) 621-7480 (530) 626-5514 link 2850 Fairlane Court, Placerville, CA 95667 P.O. Box 678001, Placerville, CA 95667
Fresno County borth@co.fresno.ca.us (559) 600-8683 (559) 488-3279 link 2221 Kern Street, Fresno, CA 93721
Glenn County info@countyofglenn.net (530) 934-6414 530-934-6571 link 516 W. Sycamore Street, Willows, CA 95988
Humboldt County humboldt_elections@co.humboldt.ca.us (707) 445-7678 (707) 445-7204 link 3033 H Street, Room 20, Eureka, CA 95501
Imperial County DebbiePorter@co.imperial.ca.us 760-482-4226 (760) 337-4182 link 940 Main Street, Ste 206, El Centro, CA 92243
Inyo County kfoote@inyocounty.us (760) 878-0222 (760) 878-1805 link 168 North Edwards, Independence, CA 93526 P.O. Drawer F, Independence, CA 93526
Kern County elections@co.kern.ca.us (661) 868-3590 (800) 452-8683 (661) 868-3768 link 1115 Truxtun Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93301
Kings County elections2008@co.kings.ca.us (559) 582-3211 Ext. 4401 (559) 585-8453 link 1400 West Lacey Boulevard, Hanford, CA 93230
Lake County dianef@co.lake.ca.us 707-263-2372 707-263-2742 link 255 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, CA 95453
Lassen County lcclerk@co.lassen.ca.us (530) 251-8217 (530) 257-3480 link 220 South Lassen Street, Suite 5, Susanville, CA 96130
Los Angeles County voterinfo@rrcc.lacounty.gov (562) 466-1310 (800) 815-2666 (LA County Only) (562) 929-4790 link 12400 Imperial Hwy., Norwalk, CA 90650 P.O. Box 1024, Norwalk, CA 90651-1024
Madera County elections@co.madera.ca.gov (559)675-7720 (559)675-7870 link 200 W. 4th Street, Madera, CA 93637
Marin County elections@marincounty.org (415) 473-6456 (415) 473-6447 link 3501 Civic Center, Room 121, San Rafael, CA 94903 P.O. Box E, San Rafael, CA 94913-3904
Mariposa County cprogner@mariposacounty.org (209) 966-2007 (209) 966-6496 link 4982 10th Street, Mariposa, CA 95338 P.O. Box 247, Mariposa, CA 95338
Mendocino County acr@co.mendocino.ca.us 707-463-4371 (707) 463-4257 link Elections Department, 501 Low Gap Rd., Room 1020, Ukiah, CA 95482
Merced County webmaster@co.merced.ca.us 209-385-7541 209-385-7387 link 2222 "M" Street, Room 14, Merced, CA 95340
Modoc County clerkelections@co.modoc.ca.us 530-233-6205 (530) 233-6666 link 204 S. Court Street, Alturas, CA 96101
Mono County elections.mono@ca.gov 760-932-5537 760-932-5531 link (Library Building), 74 School Street, Annex I, Bridgeport, CA 93517 P.O. Box 237, Bridgeport, CA 93517
Monterey County elections@co.monterey.ca.us 831-796-1499 831-755-5485 link 1370 S. Main St # B, Salinas, CA 93901 P.O. Box 4400, Salinas, CA 93912
Napa County elections@countyofnapa.org (707) 253-4321 (707)253-4390 link Napa County Registrar of Voters, 900 Coombs Street, Ste 256, Napa, CA 94559-2946
Nevada County elections.mail@co.nevada.ca.us 530.265.1298 530.265.9829 link 950 Maidu Avenue, Nevada City, CA 95959
Orange County ocvoter@ocgov.com (714) 567-7600 (714) 567-7556 link 1300 South Grand Ave., Bldg. C, Santa Ana, CA 92705 P.O. Box 11298, Santa Ana, CA 92711
Placer County election@placer.ca.gov (530) 886-5650 (530) 886-5688 link 2956 Richardson Drive, Auburn, CA 95603 P.O. Box 5278, Auburn, CA 95604
Plumas County elections@countyofplumas.com (530) 283-6256 (530) 283-6155 link 520 Main Street, Room 102, Quincy, CA 95971
Riverside County rovweb@co.riverside.ca.us (951) 486-7200 (951) 486-7335 link 2724 Gateway Drive, Riverside, CA 92507-0918
Sacramento County voterinfo@saccounty.net (916) 875-6451 (916) 875-6228 link 7000 65th Street, Ste A, Sacramento, CA 95823-2315
San Benito County acurro@cosb.us (831) 636-4029 (831) 636-2939 link Courthouse, Room 206, 440 Fifth Street, Hollister, CA 95023-3843
San Bernardino County rovwebmail@rov.sbcounty.gov (909) 387-8300 (909) 387-2022 link 777 East Rialto Avenue, San Bernardino, CA 92415-0770
San Diego County rovmail@sdcounty.ca.gov (858) 565-5800 (800) 696-0136 (858) 694-2955 link 5201 Ruffin Road, Suite I, San Diego, CA 92123 P.O. Box 85656, San Diego, CA 92186-5656
San Francisco County sfvote@sfgov.org (415) 554-4375 (415) 554-7344 link City Hall - 1 Dr. Carlton B Goodlett Place, Room 48, San Francisco, CA 94102-4635
San Joaquin County vbm@sjgov.org (209) 468-2885 (209) 468-2889 link 44 N. San Joaquin Street, Suite 350, Stockton, CA 95202 P.O. Box 810, Stockton, CA 95201
San Luis Obispo County elections@co.slo.ca.us (805) 781-5228 (805) 781-1111 link 1055 Monterey Street, Room D-120, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408
San Mateo County registrar@smcare.org (650) 312-5222 (650) 312-5348 link Registration-Elections Division, 40 Tower Road, San Mateo, CA 94402
Santa Barbara County electionssupport@co.santa-barbara.ca.us (805) 568-2200 (800) 722-8683 (805) 568-2209 link 4440-A Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA 93110 P.O. Box 61510, Santa Barbara, CA 93160-1510
Santa Clara County registrar@rov.sccgov.org (408) 299-8683 (866) 430-8683 (408) 998-7314 link 1555 Berger Drive, Bldg. 2, San Jose, CA 95112 P.O. Box 611360, San Jose, CA 95161-1360
Santa Cruz County gail.pellerin@co.santa-cruz.ca.us (831) 454-2060 (831) 454-2445 link 701 Ocean Street, Room 210, Santa Cruz, CA 95060-4076
Shasta County countyclerk@co.shasta.ca.us (530) 225-5730 (530) 225-5454 link 1643 Market Street, Redding, CA 96001 P.O. Box 990880, Redding, CA 96099-0880
Sierra County hfoster@sierracounty.ws (530) 289-3295 (530) 289-2830 link 100 Courthouse Square, Room 11, P.O. Drawer D, Downieville, CA 95936-0398
Siskiyou County csetzer@co.siskiyou.ca.us (530) 842-8084 (530) 841-4110 link 510 North Main Street, Yreka, CA 96097-9910
Solano County elections@solanocounty.com (707) 784-6675 (707) 784-6678 link 675 Texas St, Ste 2600, Fairfield, CA 94533
Sonoma County rov-voterreg@sonoma-county.org (707) 565-6800 (707) 565-6843 link 435 Fiscal Drive, Santa Rosa, CA 95403 P.O. Box 11485, Santa Rosa, CA 95406-1485
Stanislaus County stanvote@stancounty.com (209) 525-5200 (209) 525-5802 link 1021 I Street, Suite 101, Modesto, CA 95354-2331
Sutter County (530) 822-7122 (530) 822-7587 link 1435 Veterans Memorial Circle, Yuba City, CA 95993
Tehama County bross@co.tehama.ca.us (530) 527-8190 (530) 527-1140 link 444 Oak St, Room C, Red Bluff, CA 96080 P.O. Box 250, Red Bluff, CA 96080-0250
Trinity County elections@trinitycounty.org (530) 623-1220 (530) 623-8398 link 11 Court Street, Weaverville, CA 96093 P.O. Box 1215, Weaverville, CA 96093-1258
Tulare County absentee@co.tulare.ca.us (559) 624-7300 (559) 737-4498 link 5951 South Mooney Blvd, Visalia, CA 93277
Tuloumne County clerk@tuolumnecounty.ca.gov (209) 533-5570 (209) 694-8931 link Elections Department, 2 South Green Street, Sonora, CA 95370-4696
Venture County (805) 654-2781 (805) 648-9200 link 800 South Victoria Avenue, L-1200, Ventura, CA 93009-1200
Yolo County cntyclrk@yoloelections.org (530) 666-8133 (530) 666-8123 link 625 Court Street, Room B05, Woodland, CA 95695 P.O. Box 1820, Woodland, CA 95776-1820
Yuba County elections@co.yuba.ca.us (530) 749-7855 (530) 749-7854 link 915 8th Street, Suite 107, Marysville, CA 95901-5273

Term limits

California state executives and legislators have term limits. These limits were established by Proposition 140, Proposition 28 and Section 2, Article V of the California Constitution.

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits, States with gubernatorial term limits and California state executive official elections, 2014

The state executive term limits in California are as follows:[41]

The three state executives who are term-limited in 2014 are:

Name Party Office
Debra Bowen Electiondot.png Democratic Secretary of State
Bill Lockyer Electiondot.png Democratic Treasurer
John Chiang Electiondot.png Democratic Controller

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits and California Proposition 28, Change in Term Limits (June 2012)

A politician can serve in the California State Legislature for a cumulative total of 12 years. These years can be served in either or both the California State Senate or the California State Assembly.[42]

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

A total of 24 state legislators will be termed out in 2014.

They are:[43]

Name Party Chamber District
Wesley Chesbro Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 2
Dan Logue Ends.png Republican State Assembly District 3
Mariko Yamada Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 4
Nancy Skinner Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 15
Joan Buchanan Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 16
Tom Ammiano Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 17
Connie Conway Ends.png Republican State Assembly District 26
Paul Fong Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 28
Brian Nestande Ends.png Republican State Assembly District 42
John Perez Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 53
Curt Hagman Ends.png Republican State Assembly District 55
Manuel Perez Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 56
Steven Bradford Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 62
Isadore Hall, III Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 64
Bonnie Lowenthal Electiondot.png Democratic State Assembly District 70
Diane Harkey Ends.png Republican State Assembly District 73
Darrell Steinberg Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 6
Leland Yee Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 8
Ellen M. Corbett Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 10
Alex Padilla Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 20
Ronald S. Calderon Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 30
Gloria Negrete McLeod Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 32
Lou Correa Electiondot.png Democratic State Senate District 34
Mark Wyland Ends.png Republican State Senate District 38

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

A total of 30 state legislators were termed out in 2012.

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

A total of 26 state legislators were termed out in 2010.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from California and List of United States Senators from California

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from California:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from California
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 2 38 40
     Republican Party 0 15 15
TOTALS as of August 2014 2 53 55

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of California:

State Senate

Party As of August 2014
     Democratic Party 28
     Republican Party 12
Total 40

State House

Party As of August 2014
     Democratic Party 55
     Republican Party 24
     Vacancy 1
Total 80


See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

News

Other information

References

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  2. California Secretary of State Website, "Key Dates and Deadlines," accessed October 21, 2013
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 California Secretary of State Website, "Political Party Qualification," accessed October 21, 2013
  4. Fair Political Practices Commission, "Filing Schedule for State Candidate Controlled Committees June 3, 2014 Ballot," accessed December 27, 2013
  5. Fair Political Practices Commission, " Filing Schedule for State Candidate Controlled Committees November 4, 2014 Ballot," accessed January 22, 2014
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  7. California Secretary of State Website, "Primary Elections in California," accessed December 23, 2013
  8. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
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  10. Ballot Access News, "California Secretary of State Says Americans Elect Will be Ballot-Qualified Throughout 2014," February 18, 2014
  11. State Ballot Measures, "June 8, 2010 Results Page," accessed October 28, 2013
  12. Los Angeles Times, "Californians to decide on open primary amendment," November 27, 2009
  13. Santa Cruz Sentinel, "Proposition 14: Campaign for open primaries rolls out of the gate," February 8, 2010
  14. Los Angeles Times, "Ballot measures to the rescue," February 9, 2010
  15. Santa Cruz Sentinel, "Proposition 14: Campaign for open primaries rolls out of the gate," February 8, 2010
  16. IVN, "Assembly committee debates potential costs of open primary initiative," May 3, 2010
  17. Ballot Access News, "California Legislator Sandre Swanson Speaks Out Against 'Top-Two Open Primary,'" February 7, 2010
  18. SF Gate, "Suit over Prop. 14 abolishing party primaries," July 30, 2010
  19. Writ of Mandate Reply Brief in Field v. Bowen
  20. 20.0 20.1 Calnewsroom.com, "In statewide debut, top-two primary blocks third parties from June ballot," February 14, 2014
  21. Ballot Access News, "California Special Election Returns, State Senate District 23," March 26, 2014
  22. Global Strategy Group, "Even in Big Blue California, Democrats Face a Turnout Crisis," March 24, 2014
  23. Ballot Access News, "California Republican Party Official Files Lawsuit, Asserting that Two Republican Congressional Candidates are “Sham” Candidates and Should be Removed from Ballot," March 27, 2014
  24. CalNewsroom.com, "Padilla, Yee looking at 3rd party ballot access issues," February 20, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 California Elections Code, "Sections 5000-5006," accessed October 28, 2014
  26. California Secretary of State Office, "Odd-Numbered Year Report of Registration," February 10, 2013
  27. California Secretary of State Office, "Report of Registration as of October 18, 2010"
  28. United States Elections Project, "2010 General Election Turnout Rates," Last Updated February 4, 2012
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 29.3 29.4 29.5 Summary of Qualifications and Requirements for the Office of State Senator, Member of the Assembly, "June 3, 2014, Primary Election," accessed October 21, 2013
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  32. Ballotpedia phone call with Elections Division of California Secretary of State Office, October 9, 2013
  33. California Elections Code, "Section 8020-8028," accessed October 28, 2013
  34. 34.0 34.1 California Elections Code, "Section 8061," accessed December 23, 2013
  35. California Elections Code, "Section 8060-8070," accessed December 23, 2013
  36. Summary of Qualifications and Requirements for the Office of State Senator, Member of the Assembly, "June 3, 2014, Primary Election," accessed October 21, 2013
  37. California Elections Code, "Section 100-106," accessed December 31, 2013
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 38.3 38.4 FPPC Campaign Manual, "Chapter 5 Getting Started," accessed October 21, 2013
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 39.3 FPPC Campaign Manual, "Chapter 6 When and Where to File Reports," accessed December 23, 2013
  40. California Fair Political Practices Commission, "California State Contribution Limits," accessed December 23, 2013
  41. California Constitution, "Article V, Section 2 and Section 11" accessed November 4, 2013
  42. The Council of State Governments, "State Legislative Branch," accessed October 28, 2013
  43. Govbuddy, "California Directory," accessed October 28, 2013