Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Missouri

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ballot Access Requirements for Candidates
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Information by State
Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • Florida • Georgia  • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • Washington, D.C. • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

Information about Ballot Access and Voting
Election DatesState election agenciesBallot accessPoll Opening and Closing Times
Absentee voting • Early voting
Open Primary •
Closed Primary • Blanket Primary
U.S. House requirements for Independents in 2014
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Missouri. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Missouri. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Missouri elections, 2014

Missouri will have a primary election on August 5, 2014 and a general election on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The filing deadline for candidates running in the primary election was March 25, 2014, and the filing deadline for independent candidates running in the general election is July 28, 2014. New parties must submit formation petitions by July 28, 2014 in order to qualify for placement on the 2014 general election ballot.[1][2]

Legend:      Ballot Access     Campaign Finance     Election Date




Dates and requirements for candidates in 2014
Deadline Event type Event description
March 25, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for candidates running in the primary election
April 8, 2014 Campaign finance Personal Financial Disclosure due for primary candidates**
April 15, 2014 Campaign finance April Quarterly Report due for primary candidates**
July 15, 2014 Campaign finance July Quarterly Report due for primary candidates**
July 28, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for independent candidates running in the general election; filing deadline for new party formation petitions
July 28, 2014 Campaign finance 8-day Before Report due for primary candidates**
August 5, 2014 Election date Primary election date
September 2, 2014 Campaign finance Personal Financial Disclosure due for general election candidates**
September 4, 2014 Campaign finance 30-day After Report due for primary candidates**
October 15, 2014 Campaign finance October Quarterly Report due for general election candidates**
October 27, 2014 Campaign finance 8-day Before Report due for general election candidates**
November 4, 2014 Election date General election
December 4, 2014 Campaign finance 30-day After Report due for general election candidates**
** For more information, see "Campaign finance" below.

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are four recognized political parties in Missouri.[3]

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Constitution Party http://cpmo.us/ Party platform
Libertarian http://www.lpmo.org/ Party platform
Democratic http://www.missouridems.org/ Party constitution and by-laws
Republican http://www.mogop.org/ Party platform

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Missouri[4] does not allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[5]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Missouri Revised Statutes, Section 115.315

Any group of individuals desiring to form a new political party, either throughout the state or for any congressional or state legislative district, must petition the Secretary of State for recognition. Each page of such a petition must clearly state the intention to form a new political party and must indicate in no more than five words the name of the proposed party. Petitioners must also provide a complete list of the names and addresses of the chairman and treasurer of the party. The chairman and treasurer must also submit a certified list of the names and addresses of all the party's candidates and the office being sought by each.[6][7]

If the party is being formed for the entire state, the petition must be signed by at least 10,000 registered voters. If the new party is being formed for a district, the petition must be signed by a number of registered voters in the district equal to at least two percent of the total number of voters who voted at the last election for candidates for the office being sought, or 10,000 registered voters, whichever is less. Examples of signature requirements for new parties formed at the district level are provided in the table below.[6]

Signatures required to form new parties at the district level in 2014
Office 2% of votes cast for district office Lesser of 2% of votes cast or 10,000
U.S. House District 1 6,812 6,812
State Senate District 1 1,795 1,795
State House District 1 277 277
Examples based on 2012 election results.[8]

New party formation petitions must be submitted no earlier than 8:00 a.m. on the day immediately following the general election next preceding the general election for which the petition is submitted and no later than 5:00 p.m. on the 15th Monday preceding the general election for which the petition is submitted. For example, for the 2014 election, petitions could not be submitted prior to November 7, 2012 and could not be accepted after July 28, 2014.[2]

Nominating candidates

Along with the certified list of candidates a party's chairman and treasurer must submit with the party's formation petition, a declaration of candidacy must also be submitted for each candidate (see "Process to become a candidate" for more information). The party is entitled to nominate its candidates in the manner prescribed in the party's bylaws. Thereafter, nominations must be made via primary.[7][9]

Procedural requirements

A party committee can adopt a constitution or bylaws or both, provided such constitution or bylaws do not contain provisions that conflict with state laws. Changes to party rules can require no more than a two-thirds majority vote of the total membership of a committee.[10]

Maintaining party status

In order to maintain recognized status, a state-level party must have polled for its candidate for any statewide office more than two percent of the total vote cast for that office at either of the last two general elections. In 2012, for example, the statewide office receiving the fewest total votes was Treasurer, for which 2,642,432 people voted. In order to maintain ballot access, a party's candidate for that office would have had to win at least 52,849 votes.[8][11]

A district-level party must have polled more than two percent of the entire vote cast at either of the last two general elections in which the district voted as a unit for the election of officers or representatives.[11]

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Declaration of Candidacy form for the state of Missouri.
Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states, including Missouri, elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Missouri Revised Statutes, Section 115.307 - Section 115.305

For established party candidates

Established party candidates seeking access to the primary ballot must file a Declaration of Candidacy with the appropriate elections official by 5:00 p.m. on the last Tuesday in March immediately preceding the primary. The Declaration of Candidacy cannot be submitted prior to 8:00 a.m. on the last Tuesday in February immediately preceding the primary. The declaration must state the candidate's name, residential address, office being sought, and political party.[12][13]

Before filing a Declaration of Candidacy, a candidate must pay a filing fee to the treasurer of the state or county committee of the political party whose nomination he or she is seeking in the primary. Filing fees vary according to the office sought and are as follows:[12][14]

Filing fees
Office Filing fee
Statewide offices (e.g., Governor, Secretary of State, etc.), U.S. Senator $200
U.S. Representative, State Senator $100
State House $50

A candidate must also file an affidavit with the state Department of Revenue affirming that, to the best of his or her knowledge, the candidate is not delinquent in the payment of any state-owed taxes (e.g., income tax, property tax, etc.).[12][15]

A candidate is required to file for office in person. In addition to completing the Declaration of Candidacy, a candidate must present proof of identity, a receipt for the payment of any filing fees, and a copy of the affidavit filed with the Department of Revenue. A candidate may file for office by certified mail if he or she is unable to appear in person due to a physical disability or is a member of the armed forces on active duty. Filing paperwork submitted via mail must be certified by a notary public.[12][16]

If a candidate is unable to pay the requisite filing fees, he or she may have the fee waived by filing a Declaration of Inability to Pay and a petition with his or her Declaration of Candidacy. If the candidate is filing for statewide office, the petition must be signed by a number of registered voters in the state equal to at least one-half of one percent of the total number of votes cast in the state for the office being sought at the last election in which a candidate ran for the office. If the candidate is filing for any other office, the petition must be signed by a number of registered voters in the district or political subdivision equal to at least one percent of the total number of votes cast for the office being sought at the last election in which a candidate ran for the office. Examples of signature requirements are provided in the table below:[12][16]

Petition in lieu of filing fee signature requirements
Office Votes cast in 2012 Required signatures
Governor 2,727,883 13,640
U.S. House District 1 340,583 3,406
State Senate District 1 89,744 898
State House District 1 13,831 139
Examples based on 2012 election results.[8]

Candidates for federal, statewide, and state legislative offices must file with the Secretary of State.[17]

For independent candidates

Like party candidates, independent candidates seeking access to the general election ballot must file a Declaration of Candidacy and an affidavit affirming that they are not delinquent in the payment of any state-owed taxes. Independent candidates are also required to file in person (with the same aforementioned exceptions). Independent candidates, however, are not liable for the payment of any filing fees.[18][19]

Independents must submit nominating petitions with their filing paperwork. Signature requirements vary according the office sought. For any statewide office, a nominating petition must be signed by at least 10,000 registered voters of the state. If the candidate seeks a district-level office, the petition must be signed by a number of registered voters in the district equal to at least two percent of the total number of votes cast at the last election for the office being sought, or 10,000 signatures, whichever is less. Examples of signature requirements for nominating petitions are provided in the table below:[18][19]

Nominating petition signature requirements
Office Votes cast in 2012 Required signatures
Governor 2,727,883 10,000
U.S. House District 1 340,583 6,812
State Senate District 1 89,744 1,795
State House District 1 13,831 277
Examples based on 2012 election results.[8]

Independent candidates must file all requisite paperwork (including petitions) by 5:00 p.m. on the 15th Monday immediately preceding the general election for which the petition is submitted. Paperwork cannot be submitted prior to 8:00 a.m. on the day immediately following the general election next preceding the general election for which the petition is submitted.[18][2]

Candidates for federal, statewide, and state legislative offices must file with the Secretary of State.[17][18]

For write-in candidates

In order to have their votes tallied, write-in candidates must file a Declaration of Intent to Be a Write-In Candidate with the proper election official by 5:00 p.m. on the second Friday immediately preceding the election. Write-in candidates are not permitted on the primary ballot.[20][21]

Write-in candidates for federal, statewide, and state legislative office must file with the Secretary of State.[17]

Petition requirements

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Missouri Revised Statutes, Section 115.325

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain access to the ballot. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in Missouri.

General requirements

Nominating petitions and petitions submitted in lieu of filing fees are subject to the following requirements:[22][23]

  • Each page or sheet attached to a page of each petition must declare concisely the intention to nominate either an independent candidate or a party candidate who is unable to pay the filing fee, as the case may be.
  • Each page or sheet attached to a page of each petition must include the name and address of the candidate.
  • Each page or sheet attached to a page of each petition must indicate the office being sought.

Pages must be of uniform size, and the space for signatures on either side a petition page must be no larger than 8.5 by 14 inches. Each page can contain signatures of registered voters from only one county. When submitted for filing, the pages of each petition must be numbered sequentially.[24]

Petitions for the formation of a new political party must be in substantially the following form:[24]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

It is a felony for anyone to sign any petition for the formation of a new party with any name other than his or her own, or knowingly to sign his or her name more than once to the same petition, or to sign a petition when he or she knows he or she is not a registered voter. Signing this petition does not obligate you to vote for any candidate or party.

PETITION FOR PLACING A NEW PARTY ON THE BALLOT

To the Honorable [title of official with whom petition is to be filed] for [the state of Missouri or appropriate county]:

We, the undersigned, citizens and registered voters of the state of Missouri, [name of county] County and [district if appropriate], respectfully order that the [name of new political party] and its candidates be placed on the ballot, for election or rejection to such public offices at the next election, to be held on the [date] day of [month, year], and each for himself or herself says: I have personally signed this petition; I am a registered voter of the state of Missouri, [name of county] County and [district if appropriate]; my registered voting address and the name of the city, town or village in which I live are correctly written after my name.

Petitions for independent candidates must be in substantially the following form:[24]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

It is a felony for anyone to sign any petition for the nomination of an independent candidate with any name other than his or her own, or knowingly to sign his or her name more than once to the same petition, or to sign a petition when he or she knows he or she is not a registered voter.

PETITION FOR THE NOMINATION OF AN INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE

To the Honorable [title of official with whom petition is to be filed] for [the state of Missouri or appropriate county]:

We, the undersigned, citizens and registered voters of the state of Missouri, [name of county] County and [district if appropriate], nominate [name of independent candidate], residing at [address of candidate], as an independent candidate for [name of public office for which candidate is to be nominated] and respectfully order that the name of [name of candidate] be placed on the ballot, for election or rejection to such office at the next election, to be held on the [date] day of [month, year], and each for himself or herself says: I have personally signed this petition; I am a registered voter of the state of Missouri, [name of county] County and [district if appropriate]; my registered voting address and the name of the city, town or village in which I live are correctly written after my name.

Circulator requirements

Each petition must include a circulator's affidavit on which the circulator attests before a notary public that he or she is a resident of the state of Missouri. The relevant statutes stipulate no further requirements for circulators.[24]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Missouri Revised Statutes, "Chapter 130: Campaign Finance Disclosure Law"

General requirements

All candidates for statewide and state legislative office must file a Personal Financial Disclosure statement with the Missouri Ethics Commission no later than 14 days after the closing date of the candidate filing period. Incumbents must report information from January 1 of the previous calendar year to the closing date of the candidate filing period. New candidates must report information for the 12 months prior to the closing date of the candidate filing period.[25]

All candidates and all committees, regardless of their reporting status, must keep accurate and up-to-date records of all financial activities. If a candidate receives total contributions of $500 or less, makes total expenditures of $500 or less, and no single contributor (other than the candidate) contributes more than $325, the candidate may file a Statement of Exemption and Exemption Statement of Limited Activity Reports. All other candidates who exceed these thresholds must submit a Statement of Committee Organization, as well as subsequent required disclosure reports.[25]

If a candidate is required to file a Statement of Committee Organization, he or she must do the following:[25]

  1. Identify the committee type (i.e., candidate committee)
  2. Form the committee (e.g., open a committee bank account, appoint a treasurer, etc. -- treasurers must be state residents, must reside in candidate district, and must be appointed by the candidate)
  3. Register the committee (file Statement of Committee Organization within 20 days after the committee is formed and no later than the deadline for filing of the first disclosure report)
  4. Identify the office with which reports must be filed (Missouri Ethics Commission for statewide candidates; Missouri Ethics Commission and local election authority for state legislative candidates)
  5. File campaign finance reports (all statewide and legislative candidates are required to file reports electronically with the Missouri Ethics Commission via the office's Campaign Finance Reporting System)

Any amendments to committee or financial disclosure information should be made within 20 days of the change prompting the amendment. Before closing, a committee must distribute any remaining funds and dissolve any remaining debt. A committee can be terminated by filing a Committee Termination Statement and Disclosure Report within 10 days of the committee's dissolution.[25]

Reporting requirements

A series of regular disclosure reports are required for both the primary and general election cycles. in these reports, all contributions from committees must be itemized, and contributions from persons giving more than $100 must be itemized (including the name, address, and employer of the contributor, as well as the date, amount, and aggregate total to date of the contributions). All expenditures of over $100 must be itemized (including the name and address of the recipient, as well as the date, purpose, and amount of the payment).[25][26]

Reporting schedules for 2014 are as follows:[27]

2014 primary election campaign finance deadlines
Report type Closing date of report Due date
Personal Financial Disclosure N/A April 8, 2014
April Quarterly Report* March 31, 2014 April 15, 2014
July Quarterly Report June 30, 2014 July 15, 2014
8-day Before Report July 24, 2014 July 28, 2014
30-day After Report August 30, 2014 September 4, 2014
* Due if the committee formed prior to March 31, 2014.[27]
2014 general election campaign finance deadlines
Report type Closing date of report Due date
Personal Financial Disclosure* N/A September 2, 2014
October Quarterly Report September 30, 2014 October 15, 2014
8-day Before Report October 23, 2014 October 27, 2014
30-day After Report October 29, 2014 December 4, 2014
* A candidate who was required to file a Personal Financial Disclosure due to his or her participation in a primary election must amend the disclosure by the close of business on the Monday preceding the general election if any changes occur.[27]

In addition to regular disclosure reports, any individual or committee receiving any contributions from any single contributor over $5,000 must electronically report the contribution to the Missouri Ethics Commission within 48 hours of receipt. Any contribution over $250 that is received between the 11th day prior to and the day before the election must be reported within 24 hours of receipt.[25][28]

Committees must continue to file quarterly reports until the committee successfully terminates.[25]

Contribution limits

There are no statutory limits on individual campaign contributions in Missouri.[29][30]

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

  • Secretary of State Elections Division
Why: To submit filing paperwork for statewide executive offices, congressional seats and state legislature seats
Physical address: 600 West Main Street, Jefferson City, MO 65101
Mailing address: James C. Kirkpatrick State Information Center, PO Box 1767, Jefferson City, MO 65102-1767
Telephone: (573) 751-2301
Toll free: (800) NOW-VOTE (669-8683)
Fax: (573) 526-3242
Email: elections@sos.mo.gov
http://www.sos.mo.gov/
  • Missouri Ethics Commission
Why: For questions regarding campaign finance reporting
Physical address: 3411A Knipp Drive, Jefferson City, MO 65109
Mailing address: PO Box 1370, Jefferson City, MO 65102
Telephone: (573) 751-2020
Toll free: (800) 392-8660
Fax: (573) 526-4506
Email: helpdesk@mec.mo.gov
http://www.mec.mo.gov/

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits, States with gubernatorial term limits, and Missouri state executive official elections, 2014

The state executive term limits in Missouri are as follows:[31]

There are no state executive offices affected by term limits in 2014.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

Members of the Missouri General Assembly may serve no more than 8 years total in any one house and no more than 16 years total in both houses.[32]

Term limits were imposed on state legislators by a constitutional amendment approved by voters in 1992. This was further amended in 2002.

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

There are 13 state legislators who will be termed out in 2014.

Name Party House District
Scott Rupp Ends.png Republican Senate District 2
Jolie Justus Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 10
Brad Lager Ends.png Republican Senate District 12
Ryan McKenna Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 22
Tom Dempsey Ends.png Republican Senate District 23
Mike Thomson Ends.png Republican House District 1
Jeff Grisamore Ends.png Republican House District 34
Ed Schieffer Electiondot.png Democratic House District 41
Stanley Cox Ends.png Republican House District 52
Rick Stream Ends.png Republican House District 90
Doug Funderburk Ends.png Republican House District 103
Timothy Jones Ends.png Republican House District 110
Steve Hodges Electiondot.png Democratic House District 149

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

There were 34 state legislators who were termed out in 2012.

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

There were 62 state legislators who were termed out in 2010.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Missouri and List of United States Senators from Missouri

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Missouri:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Missouri
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 1 2 3
     Republican Party 1 5 6
TOTALS as of April 2014 2 7 9

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Missouri:

Senate

Party As of April 2014
     Democratic Party 9
     Republican Party 23
     Vacancy 2
Total 34

House

Party As of April 2014
     Democratic Party 52
     Republican Party 108
     Vacancy 3
Total 163

See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

Other information

References

  1. Missouri Secretary of State "2014 Missouri Election Calendar," accessed March 6, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.329," accessed March 6, 2014
  3. Ballotpedia phone call with Missouri Office of the Secretary of State on September 10, 2013
  4. Missouri Revised Statutes "Chapter 115, Section 239.1," accessed December 5, 2013
  5. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.315," accessed March 6, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.327," accessed March 6, 2014
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Missouri Secretary of State "Nov. 6 2012 General Election," accessed March 6, 2014
  9. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.339," accessed March 6, 2014
  10. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.627," accessed March 6, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.013," accessed March 6, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 Missouri Revised Statutes "Filing Information for Candidates," accessed March 11, 2014
  13. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.349," accessed March 11, 2014
  14. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.357," accessed March 11, 2014
  15. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.342," accessed March 10, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.355," accessed March 11, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.353," accessed March 11, 2014
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 Missouri Secretary of State "Independent Candidate Information," accessed March 11, 2014
  19. 19.0 19.1 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.321," accessed March 11, 2014
  20. Missouri Secretary of State "Write-In Candidates," accessed March 11, 2014
  21. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.453," accessed March 11, 2014
  22. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.357," accessed March 11, 2014
  23. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.321," accessed March 11, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 115.325," accessed March 11, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 25.5 25.6 Missouri Ethics Commission "Guide to Ethics Laws 2014: A Plain English Summary," September 2013
  26. Missouri Ethics Commission "Reporting Packet," accessed March 11, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 Missouri Ethics Commission "Upcoming Filing Deadlines and Reminders," accessed March 11, 2014
  28. Missouri Ethics Commission "Reporting Packet," accessed March 11, 2014
  29. National Conference of State Legislatures "State Limits on Contributions to Candidates," updated October 2013
  30. Missouri Revised Statutes "Section 130.011," accessed March 11, 2014
  31. Missouri Constitution, "Article IV, Section 17," accessed November 14, 2013
  32. Missouri Constitution, "Article III, Section 8," accessed November 14, 2013