Ballotpedia's 2013-2014 congressional election coverage plan

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Welcome to Ballotpedia’s one-stop source for information about the 2014 Congressional elections. On this page you can find comprehensive, unbiased coverage of candidates and elections, including links to every state’s general election page on Ballotpedia and unique election reporting. Additionally, this page will outline coverage plans for any special elections to the 113th Congress.

If you have any questions about congressional elections please contact Sarah Rosier.

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Click here for an index of all Congress related Ballotpedia reports.
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Our coverage

We will be covering elections in the 435 U.S. House seats as well as the 36 U.S. Senate races being held on November 4, 2014. Additionally, Ballotpedia will build pages on any special elections that occur in 2013 or 2014.

Our candidate pages

There are two types of candidates: current officials who are running for office and new candidates who do not currently hold an office we cover on Ballotpedia. For all candidates we strive to provide you, our reader, with the following information:

  • Clear biographical information, including education
  • Who the candidates is running against and when the elections will be held
  • Photo of the candidate
  • Campaign themes
  • Campaign donor information
  • Campaign logos
  • Links to their campaign website, Facebook candidate pages, and Twitter accounts (where available)
  • Election results

Signature filing deadlines

Each state sets the deadline for when candidates must declare for election. Once the filing deadline passes, the state will verify signatures and issue an official list of candidates document. The timing of a document like this varies for each state. Some states will immediately release a document that is an unofficial list of candidates -- meaning it could contain some candidates who ultimately may either withdraw or be disqualified prior to the primary. In these situations, Ballotpedia staff will be adding links to these lists and adding names of candidates to election pages within one to two weeks of the list being released. Profiles will then be built for the final list of candidates.

However, in other situations, states do not release any compiled list of candidates until weeks or even months have elapsed past the deadline. In these situations, Ballotpedia staff will work to build as many candidates profiles based on news reports and direct contact with candidates.

Primary elections

Ballotpedia staff will be paying particularly close attention to primaries that are contested -- meaning at least two candidates are seeking a party nomination. Profiles will be built and expanded in advance of the state primary.

As each primary takes place, Ballotpedia staff will be indicating the winners and losers within 24 hours of the primary. Candidates who defeat an opponent in a primary will then have an election box added to the profile.

Example: Jo Bonner

Following the primary, the elections page will be updated to indicate which candidates will appear in the general election. The timing of the results will vary by state.

Example: United States House of Representatives elections in Alabama, 2012

General election

On election night, Ballotpedia staff will update election pages with check marks (Approveda) to indicate the winner of the race. Election boxes will then be added to the candidate and elections pages once official results become available.

Incumbent buildup

In 2013, Ballotpedia staff will work to increase the amount of information available on incumbents profiles, congressional district pages, and congressional background pages. Examples of this type of buildup include full electoral and donor histories for incumbents and updated descriptions, maps, and census information for each of the 435 congressional districts.

In addition, staff will work to incorporate analysis from outside sources into incumbent profiles. Examples include:

Battleground districts

With a targeted focus of the 26 districts identified as battleground districts heading into 2014, the Ballotpedia team will provide readers with comprehensive information on these elections, above and beyond our normal election coverage. This will include a compilation of media attention, outside spending, issues affecting the campaign and thorough profiles on candidates.

Beginning in January, Ballotpedia released one in-depth look at each competitive district every week.

However, for the 409 districts that did not receive a competitive label, you will still see the same coverage you expect from Ballotpedia.

Original analysis

Throughout this midterm election season, Ballotpedia staff will create original analysis pages regarding the congressional races. At Ballotpedia, we believe in the power of information to connect people to politics. With Congressional elections, we believe it is important to identify the races that are truly competitive and make that readily apparent to readers. We will create an index that identifies districts that are most likely to actually be unpredictable on election day. The impetus for this research comes from 2012 election results, during which only 63 races were decided by 10 percentage points or less. The majority of congressional races are already decided before voters head to the polls -- as they are predominantly one-party districts. When it comes to the general election, we will work to determine which districts are battlegrounds.

Some existing research pages created include:

Special elections

District Prior Incumbent Special Election Candidates (General Election Only) Election Date Winner Partisan Switch?
Illinois' 2nd Jesse Jackson Jr. Democratic Party Robin Kelly
Republican Party Paul McKinley
Green Party LeAlan M. Jones
Independent Curtis Llong Bey
Independent Marcus Lewis
Independent Elizabeth Pahlke
April 9, 2013[1] Democratic Party Robin Kelly No
South Carolina's 1st Tim Scott Democratic Party Elizabeth Colbert-Busch
Republican Party Mark Sanford
Green Party Eugene Platt
May 7, 2013[2][3] Republican PartyMark Sanford No
Missouri's 8th Jo Ann Emerson Democratic Party Steve Hodges
Republican Party Jason T. Smith
Libertarian Party Bill Slantz
Constitution Party Doug Enyart
June 4, 2013[4][5] Republican PartyJason T. Smith No
US Senator from Massachusetts John Kerry Democratic Party Ed Markey
Republican Party Gabriel Gomez
June 25, 2013[6] Democratic PartyEd Markey No
US Senator from New Jersey Frank Lautenberg Democratic Party Cory Booker
Republican Party Steve Lonegan
October 16, 2013[7] Democratic PartyCory Booker No
Louisiana's 5th Rodney Alexander Republican Party Neil Riser
Republican Party Vance McAllister
November 16, 2013[8] Republican PartyVance McAllister No
Massachusetts' 5th Ed Markey Democratic Party Katherine Clark
Republican Party Frank Addivinola
December 10, 2013[9][10] Democratic PartyKatherine Clark No
Alabama's 1st Jo Bonner Democratic Party Burton LeFlore
Republican Party Bradley Byrne
December 17, 2013[11] Republican PartyBradley Byrne No
Florida's 13th C.W. Bill Young Democratic Party Alex Sink
Republican Party David Jolly
Libertarian Party Lucas Overby
Independent Michael Levinson
March 11, 2014[12] Republican PartyDavid Jolly No
Florida's 19th Trey Radel Democratic Party April Freeman
Republican Party Curt Clawson
Libertarian Party Ray Netherwood
Independent Timothy Rossano
June 24, 2014[13] Republican Party Curt Clawson No
US Senator from Hawaii Daniel Inouye Democratic Party Brian Schatz
Republican Party Cam Cavasso
Libertarian Party Michael Kokoski
Independent Arturo Reyes
Independent Joy Allison
November 4, 2014[14] Pending
US Senator from South Carolina Jim DeMint Republican Party Tim Scott
Democratic Party Joyce Dickerson
Libertarian Party Thomas Coyne
Independent Brandon Armstrong
Independent Jill Bossi - American Party of South Carolina
November 4, 2014[15] Pending
North Carolina's 12th Melvin Watt Democratic Party Alma Adams
Republican Party Vince Coakley
November 4, 2014 Pending
US Senator from Oklahoma Tom Coburn Republican Party James Lankford
Democratic Party Constance Johnson
Independent Mark Beard
November 4, 2014[16] Pending
Virginia's 7th Eric Cantor Republican Party David Brat
Democratic Party Jack Trammell
November 4, 2014[17] Pending

Color Key
Color Cook Partisan Voting Index Fairvote (Projected D%) Margin of Victory (MOV) 2012 Presidential MOV % % 2008 Presidential MOV % Incumbent years in office
Purple- most competitive Even; R or D 0-4 45.1% - 54.9% 0-4.9 0-4.9 0-4.9 0 - 4
Orange- very competitive R or D 5-7 42.1% - 45.0%; 55% - 57.9% 5.0-7.9 5.0-7.9 5.0-7.9 5 - 7
Green- competitive R or D 8-10 40.0% - 42.0%; 58% - 60% 8.0-10.00 8.0-10.00 8.0-10.00 8 - 10
House winners labeled this color indicate the party of the House winner being different from the party of the presidential winner of the district in 2012
Districts labeled this color indicate the districts that were pushed into most competitive based on heavily redrawn congressional districts
Most competitive districts for 2014 elections
Congressional district Battleground label Cook PVI Fairvote (Projected D%) Margin of Victory (MOV) in 2012 2012 Presidential MOV % 2008 Presidential MOV % Incumbent years in office 2012 House winner Campaign contributions difference Cost per vote for winner in 2012
Arizona's 1st Battleground D R+4 48% 3.6 -2.5 -3.2 0 Democratic 61.38% $19.13
Arizona's 2nd Battleground D R+3 50.9% 0.8 -1.5 -0.9 0 Democratic 65.57% $18.85
Arizona's 9th Battleground D R+1 51% 4.1 ✓4.5 ✓3.9 0 Democratic 64.44% $17.78
California's 7th Battleground D EVEN 51.4% 3.4 ✓4 ✓5 0 Democratic 57.34% $25.72
California's 21st Battleground R D+2 50.9% 15.5 ✓11.1 ✓6 0 Republican 91.39% $19.59
California's 36th Battleground D R+1 51.2% 5.9 ✓3.2 ✓3 0 Democratic 46.67% $17.94
California's 52nd Battleground D D+2 52.3% 2.4 ✓6.4 ✓12 0 Democratic 62.23% $28.93
Colorado's 6th Battleground R D+1 45.1% 2 ✓5.1 ✓8.7 4 Republican 66.81% $20.99
Florida's 18th Battleground D R+3 47.7% 0.6 -4.1 ✓3.1 0 Democratic 19.70% $28.58
Florida's 26th Battleground D R+1 53.1% 10.6 ✓6.7 -0.4 0 Democratic 69.59% $10.28
Illinois' 12th Battleground D EVEN 50.1% 8.9 ✓1.5 ✓11.1 0 Democratic 46.64% $7.52
Illinois' 13th Battleground R EVEN 47.2% 0.3 -0.3 ✓11 0 Republican 51.38% $10.22
Michigan's 1st Battleground R R+5 45.1% 0.5 -8.3 ✓1.3 2 Republican 59.74% $13.30
Minnesota's 8th Battleground D D+1 52.4% 8.9 ✓5.5 ✓8.6 0 Democratic 34.52% $6.52
Nevada's 3rd Battleground R EVEN 44.2% 7.5 ✓0.8 ✓8.9 2 Republican 61.24% $17.66
New Hampshire's 1st Battleground D R+1 50.4% 3.8 ✓1.6 ✓6.4 0 Democratic 47.47% $10.02
New Jersey's 2nd Battleground R D+1 40.2% 17.4 ✓8.1 ✓7.7 18 Republican 96.60% $9.40
New Jersey's 3rd Battleground R R+1 44.8% 8.9 ✓4.6 ✓3.4 2 Republican 66.17% $11.94
New York's 1st Battleground D R+2 51.3% 4.6 ✓0.5 ✓3 10 Democratic 54.54% $18.81
New York's 11th Battleground R R+2 46.1% 5 ✓4.3 -3 2 Republican 70.91% $21.96
New York's 18th Battleground D EVEN 51.5% 3.7 ✓4.3 ✓5 0 Democratic 40.94% $15.69
New York's 21st Battleground D EVEN 51.5% 1.9 ✓6.1 ✓5 4 Democratic 50.05% $15.54
New York's 23rd Battleground R R+3 45.6% 3.6 -1.2 ✓1 3 Republican 71.76% $15.31
Texas' 23rd Battleground D R+3 48.7% 4.8 -2.6 ✓1 0 Democratic 39.93% $18.65
Virginia's 2nd Battleground R R+2 43.4% 7.7 ✓1.5 ✓1.7 2 Republican 54.38% $14.42
West Virginia's 3rd Battleground D R+14 50.4% 7.1 -32.2 -13.4 20 Democratic 69.55% $13.26

2014 Congressional primary information
State Signature Filing Deadline Primary Date Notes/Costs for candidates in 2014 Days between Deadline and Primary
Alabama Red padlock.png 2/7/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 Candidates must qualify with political parties to gain ballot access to the primary election.[18] 116
Alaska Red padlock.png6/2/2014 Red padlock.png 8/19/2014 Candidates must pay a $100 Filing Fee.[19] 78
Arizona Red padlock.png 5/28/2014 Red padlock.png 8/26/2014 Write-in candidates must file by 7/17/2014.[20] Signature requirements vary by district.[21] 90
Arkansas Red padlock.png 3/3/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Independent candidates must also submit petitions with the Secretary of State Office. Those are due by 5/1/2014.[22][23] 68
California Red padlock.png 3/7/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 Candidates may pay a filing fee instead of submitting petitions. If they choose to do this, their deadline is 3/7/2014. The candidate filing fee is equal to 1% of the first year's salary, $1,740.[24] Write-in candidates must file by 5/20/2014.[25] 113
Colorado Red padlock.png 3/31/2014 Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 Candidates may also file by assembly nomination through a major party and by the write-in process. Major party candidates must file by 4/12/2014, and write-in candidates must file by 4/18/2014.[26][27][28] Major party candidates for Senate are required to have 1,500 signatures per congressional district. Minor party candidates for Senate are required to have 1,000 signatures or signatures equal to 2% of votes, whichever is less. Major party candidates for the House are required to have 1,000 signatures, or 30% of the votes, whichever is less. Minor party candidates for House are required to have 800 signatures or 2% of votes, whichever is less.[29] 85
Connecticut Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 Red padlock.png8/12/2014 Candidates running by petition must collect registered voter signatures equal to one percent of the votes cast in the previous election for the same office or 7,500 signatures of registered voters, whichever is fewer.[30] 63
Delaware Red padlock.png 7/8/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 The filing fee amount is set by the candidate's political party and is payable to the candidate's political party. There is no filing fee for independent candidates.[31] 63
Florida Red padlock.png 3/31/2014 Red padlock.png8/26/2014 The filing deadline for candidates paying a filing fee instead of submitting petitions is 5/2/2014.[32][33] Major political party candidates must pay a filing fee of $10,440 and candidates without a party must pay a filing fee of $6,960. Senate Candidates must submit 112,174 signatures, and House candidates must submit 2,298 signatures.[34] 148
Georgia Red padlock.png 3/7/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Candidates must pay a filing fee of $5,220, 3% of the annual salary of $174,000.[35] 53
Hawaii Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 Red padlock.png8/9/2014 Filing Fees vary with Office sought. Signature requirements range from 15-25 signatures depending on office.[36] 67
Idaho Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Candidates are required to pay a $300 fee and file 500 signatures from with the congressional district.[37] 67
Illinois Red padlock.png 12/2/2013 Red padlock.png 3/18/2014 Established party candidates must collect signatures equal to at least one-half of one percent of the total number of registered voters qualified to vote in their party's primary in the last presidential election. Independent candidates and new party candidates must collect signatures equal to no less than five percent of the total number of voters who voted in the same congressional district in the most recent general election, but independent candidates cannot collect more than eight percent of that total.[38] 106
Indiana Red padlock.png 2/7/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 Candidates for Senate must submit at least 4,500 signatures, with 500 signatures from each of the 9 congressional districts.Independent candidates for Senate must submit signatures equal to 2% of the votes cast in the previous election for Secretary of State, or 34,194. Candidate for House that are independent or minor party candidates must obtain signatures from registered voters equal to 2% of the total votes cast for

secretary of state in the 2010 general election in the election district the candidate seeks to represent.[39]

88
Iowa Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 No Filing Fees. Signature Requirements will be based on 2010 voting results, and will vary when new 2011 Redistrict Law goes into effect.[40] 81
Kansas Red padlock.png6/2/2014 Red padlock.png8/5/2014 Major Party Candidates for Senate must submit signatures equal to 1% of Party and a filing fee of 1% of Salary ($1,740) + $20. Candidates for House are required to submit signatures equal to 2% of Party and a filing fee equal to 1% of Salary ($1,740) + $20. Independent Candidates for both the House and Senate are required to submit 5,000 signatures and a filing fee of 1% of Salary ($1,740) +$20.[41] 64
Kentucky Red padlock.png 1/28/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Independent, political group and political organization candidates must file by April 1, 2014.[42] Candidates for both Senate and House are required to submit a $500 Filing Fee.[43] 102
Louisiana Red padlock.png8/22/2014 11/4/2014 Candidates for Senate and House must pay a $600 Qualifying Fee and Democratic and Republican Candidates must also pay a $300 State Central Committee Fee. Candidates for Senate may submit nominating petitions in lieu of fees with 5,000 signatures, with no less than 500 signatures from each congressional district. Candidates for House may submit nominating petitions in lieu of fees with 1,000 signatures.[44] 74
Maine Red padlock.png 3/17/2014 Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 The deadline for independent candidates is 6/2/2014.[45] Major Party Candidates for House are required to submit 1,000-1,500 signatures. Major party candidates for Senate are required to submit 2,000-3,000 signatures. Non-Party Candidates for Senate are required to submit 4,000-6,000 signatures. Non-party candidates for House are required to submit 2,000-3,000 signatures.[46] 85
Maryland Red padlock.png 2/25/2014 Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 Filing fee varies with office sought.[47] Candidates for House must pay a $100 filing fee. Candidates for Senate must pay a $290 filing fee.[48] 129
Massachusetts Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 Red padlock.png9/9/2014 The 5/6/2014 deadline is for candidates to file nomination papers with the Registrar of Voters in order to be certified. Candidates must also file paperwork with the Secretary of the Commonwealth by 6/3/2014. The deadline for non-party candidates running for federal and statewide offices to file nomination papers with the Registrar of Voters for certification is 7/29/2014, and the deadline for these non-party candidates to file paperwork with the Secretary of the Commonwealth is 8/26/2014.[49] Candidates for House must submit at least 2,000 signatures.[50][51] Candidates for Senate must submit at least 10,000 signatures.[50] 126
Michigan Red padlock.png 4/22/2014 Red padlock.png8/5/2014 Partisan Candidates must submit at least 1,000 valid signatures by 4/22/2014. Independent Candidates must submit at least 3,000 valid signatures by 7/17/2014.[52] 105
Minnesota Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Red padlock.png8/12/2014 Major party candidates must submit a $400 Filing Fee for Senate and a $300 Filing Fee for House. In place of the filing fee, candidates may submit 2,000 signatures for Senate and 1,000 signatures for House. A candidate not running as a member of a major political party must file a nominating petition to have his or her name placed on the general election ballot, with 2,000 signatures required for Senate and 1,000 signatures required for House. Independent candidates have the option of paying the filing fee instead of submitting signatures.[53] 70
Mississippi Red padlock.png 3/1/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Major party candidates for Senate must submit a $300 filing fee, and candidates for House must submit a $200 filing fee. Independent candidates must submit 1,000 signatures for Senate and 200 signatures for House.[54] 94
Missouri Red padlock.png 3/25/2014 Red padlock.png8/5/2014 Candidates for Senate must submit a $200 filing fee. Candidates for House must submit a $100 filing fee.[55] 133
Montana Red padlock.png 3/10/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Candidates for both Senate and House must submit a $1,740 filing fee.[56] 85
Nebraska Red padlock.png 2/18/2014 for incumbents; Red padlock.png 3/3/2014 for all others Red padlock.png 5/13/2014 Incumbents running for re-election must file by 2/18/2014.[42] Candidates for Senate and House must pay a filing fee of $1,740.[57] 71
Nevada Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png6/10/2014 Candidates for Senate must submit a $500 filing fee. Candidates for House must submit a $300 filing fee.[58] 88
New Hampshire Red padlock.png6/13/2014 Red padlock.png9/9/2014 Major party candidates for Senate must submit $100 filing fee or 200 signatures. Major party candidates for House must submit a $50 filing fee or 100 signatures. Independent candidates for Senate must submit $100 AND 1,500 signatures for EACH district (3,000 signatures total). Independent candidates for House must submit a $50 filing fee AND 1,500 signatures.[59] 88
New Jersey Red padlock.png 3/31/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Major party candidates for Senate must submit 1,000 signatures and major party candidates for House must submit 200 signatures.[60] 64
New Mexico Red padlock.png 3/11/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Candidates for both Senate and House must submit a $50 filing fee. Signature requirements vary with a 2% and 4% threshold and depending on political party and office.[61] 119
New York Red padlock.png 4/10/2014[62] Red padlock.png6/24/2014[63] Major party candidates for either Senate or House must submit signatures equal to 5% of the enrolled voters of the political unit, or 1,250 signatures, whichever is less. Independent candidates for Senate or House must submit 5% of enrolled voters of the political unit, or 3,500 signatures, whichever is less.[64] 71
North Carolina Red padlock.png 2/28/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 Candidates must pay a $1,740 filing fee.[65] 67
North Dakota Red padlock.png 4/7/2014 Red padlock.png6/10/2014 Signature requirement are equal to 3% of the total votes cast for the candidates of the same party for the same office in the last general election. (No more than 300 signatures required)[66] 64
Ohio Red padlock.png 2/5/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 Candidates for Senate must pay a $150 filing fee. Major party candidates must submit at least 1,000 signatures, minor party candidates 500 signatures, and independent party candidates at least 5,000 signatures. Candidates for House must pay a $85 filing fee. Major party candidates must submit at least 50 signatures and minor party candidates at least 25 signatures. Independent candidates have signature requirements based on the number of votes cast in the congressional district in the last general election for governor. If there were fewer than 5,000 votes in the last election, the signature requirement would be 25 signatures, or 5% of the vote, whichever is less. If there were more than 5,000 votes in the last election, the signature requirement would be 1% of the vote.[67] 90
Oklahoma Red padlock.png 4/11/2014 Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 74
Oregon Red padlock.png 3/11/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Senate candidates must pay $150 filing and to be included in the Voters Pamphlet submit 500 verified signatures or $3,000. House candidates must pay $100 filing fee and to be in included in the Voters Pamphlet submit 300 verified signatures or $2,500.[68] 70
Pennsylvania Red padlock.png 3/11/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 Candidates for Senate must pay a $200 filing fee and submit at least 2,000 signatures. Candidates for House must pay a $150 filing fee and submit at least 1,000 signatures.[69] 70
Rhode Island Red padlock.png6/25/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 Candidates must submit 500 signatures.[70] 76
South Carolina Red padlock.png 3/30/2014 Red padlock.png6/10/2014 Major party candidates for Senate must pay $10,440 filing fee, to be paid by party. Major party candidates for House must pay $3,480 filing fee, to be paid by party.[71] 72
South Dakota Red padlock.png 3/25/2014 Red padlock.png6/3/2014 Republican candidates for Senate and House are required to submit 1,951 signatures, equal to 1% of the votes for the 2010 republican gubernatorial candidate, 195,406. Democratic candidates for Senate and House are required to submit 1,221 signatures, equal to 1% of the 2010 democratic gubernatorial candidates, 122,037. Independent candidates for Senate and House are required to submit 3,171 signatures, equal to 1% of the total votes for governor in 2010, 317,083. Newly Recognized Political Party candidates for Senate and House must submit 250 signatures. Candidates for Senate and House forming a new political party must submit $7,928 signatures, equal to 2.5% of the total vote for governor in 2010, 317,083.[72] 65
Tennessee Red padlock.png 4/3/2014 Red padlock.png8/7/2014 A nominating petition with at least 25 signatures from voters from the candidate's district.[73] 116
Texas Red padlock.png 12/9/2013 Red padlock.png 3/4/2014 Candidates for Senate must pay a filing fee of $5,000 or submit 5,000 signatures. Candidates for House must pay a filing fee of $3,125 or 500 signatures. Independent candidates for Senate must submit signatures equal to 1% of votes for gubernatorial candidates cast in applicable territory in 2010 general election. Independent candidates for House must submit signatures equal to 5% of votes for gubernatorial candidates cast in the applicable territory in the 2010 general election.[74] 85
Utah Red padlock.png 3/20/2014 Red padlock.png6/24/2014 Candidates for Senate must pay filing fee of $1,305. Candidates for House must pay filing fee of $435.[75] 96
Vermont Red padlock.png6/12/2014 Red padlock.png8/26/2014 Candidates for both Senate and House, both major and minor parties, must submit 500 signatures.[76] 75
Virginia Red padlock.png 3/27/2014 Red padlock.png6/10/2014 Candidates for House must pay a $3,480 filing fee and submit at least 1,000 signatures.[77] 75
Washington Red padlock.png 5/16/2014 Red padlock.png8/5/2014 Candidates for both Senate and House must submit a filing fee of $1,740.[78] 81
West Virginia Red padlock.png 1/25/2014 Red padlock.png 5/13/2014 Candidates for both Senate and House must submit a filing fee of $1,740.[79] 108
Wisconsin Red padlock.png6/2/2014 Red padlock.png8/12/2014 Candidates for Senate must submit 2,000-4,000 signatures. Candidates for House must submit 1,000-2,000 signatures.[80] 85
Wyoming Red padlock.png 5/30/2014 Red padlock.png 8/19/2014 New party candidates and Independent candidates for both Senate and House are required to submit 3,740 signatures.[81] 74

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