California Proposition 27, Elimination of Citizen Redistricting Commission (2010)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Redistricting in California
A California Proposition 27, Elimination of the Citizen Redistricting Commission ballot proposition was on the November 2, 2010 ballot in California as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated.[1]

If Proposition 27 had been approved, it would have repealed California Proposition 11 (2008), which authorized the creation of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Proposition 27 would also have modified the provision in California law that says that proposed congressional districts can't be subjected to a veto referendum.[2]

Proposition 27 was one of two measures on the November 2, 2010 California ballot that dealt with redistricting; the other being Proposition 20. Proposition 27 and Proposition 20 each included a so-called "poison pill" provision. This meant that if they both had received a majority vote, the proposition that received the highest majority vote is the law that would have gone into effect. However, Proposition 20 was approved, while Proposition 27 did not receive a majority vote, so the poison-pill provisions were moot.

Legislative and congressional redistricting take place in every state in the wake of the 2010 federal census. Ballot questions about redistricting were on the ballot not just in California, but also in Florida (Amendment 5 and Amendment 6) and in Oklahoma (State Question 748).

Election results

See also: 2010 ballot measure election results
Proposition 27 (Citizen Redistricting Commission)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No5,468,70359.5%
Yes 3,736,443 40.5%
These are the final results for this election as per the California Secretary of State's statement of election results.

Proposition 27 was defeated in all California counties except San Francisco.[3]

Ballot title and summary

See also: Ballot titles, summaries and fiscal statements for California's 2010 ballot propositions

Ballot title:

Eliminates State Commission on Redistricting. Consolidates Authority for Redistricting with Elected Representatives.
Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.

Official summary:

  • Eliminates 14-member redistricting commission selected from applicant pool picked by government auditors.
  • Consolidates authority for establishing state Assembly, Senate, and Board of Equalization district boundaries with elected state representatives responsible for drawing congressional districts.
  • Reduces budget, and imposes limit on amount Legislature may spend, for redistricting.
  • Provides that voters will have the authority to reject district boundary maps approved by the Legislature.
  • Requires populations of all districts for the same office to be exactly the same.

Estimated fiscal impact:

  • Possible reduction of state redistricting costs of around $1 million over the next year.
  • Likely reduction of state redistricting costs of a few million dollars once every ten years beginning in 2020.

Constitutional changes

California Constitution
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXAXBXIXIIXIIIXIII AXIII BXIII CXIII DXIVXVXVIXVIIIXIXXIX AXIX BXIX CXXXXIXXIIXXXIVXXXV

If Proposition 27 is approved by California's voters, it will amend some parts of the California Constitution.

Specifically, it will amend:

See Text of Proposition 27, the "Financial Accountability in Redistricting Act of 2010" (California) for the text of the proposed changes.

Supporters

Daniel Lowenstein, the official proponent of the measure, is a professor at UCLA and a former chairman of the California Fair Political Practices Commission.[2]

Although Lowenstein's name is on the application for the initiative, he says that the real sponsors are Democratic members of the U.S. Congress led by Howard Berman and Berman's brother Michael Berman of Berman & D'Agostino Campaigns[4], a paid consultant for Democrats on redistricting issues. Lowenstein says, "It's Michael and Howard together."[5] Both Daniel Lowenstein and Michael Berman worked on the No on California Proposition 77 (2005) campaign where Mr. Lowenstein was Chairman and Mr. Berman was the committee's campaign consultant.[6] California Proposition 77 (2005) was a previous attempt at independent redistricting reform that failed at the ballot box. Mr. Lowenstein also wrote scholarly articles that highlight Michael Berman and his company.[7][8]

During the 2001 California redistricting process, U.S. Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez explained how the pre-Proposition 11 Gerrymandering system worked and Michael Berman's importance in the process. "Twenty thousand is nothing to keep your seat. I spend $2 million [campaigning] every year. If my colleagues are smart, they'll pay their $20,000, and Michael [Berman] will draw the district they can win in. Those who have refused to pay? God help them."[9][10][11] Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez is not funding Yes on Proposition 27, but her sister[12] U.S. Congresswoman Linda Sanchez is among the Congress Members funding Yes on Proposition 27. However, both Congresswomen Loretta Sanchez and Linda Sanchez did fund[13] the campaign against a previous redistricting measure, California Proposition 77 (2005).

Arguments in favor

Reasons Lowenstein gives to support his measure include:

  • "Under current law, three randomly selected accountants decide who can be one of the fourteen unelected commissioners who head a bureaucracy that wields the power to decide who represents us. This reform will ensure that those who make the decisions are accountable to the voters and that all their decisions are subject to approval by the voters."[14]
  • "A group of unelected commissioners, making up to $1 million a year in cumulative salary, preside over a budget that cannot be cut even when state revenues are shrinking."[14]

Arguments were submitted to the official California Voter Guide on behalf of a "yes" vote on Proposition 27, as were rebuttals to the arguments provided by Prop 27 opponents. The signers of these arguments were:

  • Daniel H. Lowenstein
  • Hank Lacayo, president, "Congress of California Seniors"
  • Mark Murray, the executive director of "Californians Against Waste"

The arguments made by them for publication in the California Voter Guide on behalf of Proposition 27 focus on these themes:

2010 propositions
Flag of California.png
June 8
Proposition 13
Proposition 14Text
Proposition 15Text
Proposition 16Text
Proposition 17Text
November 2
Proposition 19Text
Proposition 20Text
Proposition 21Text
Proposition 22Text
Proposition 23Text
Proposition 24Text
Proposition 25Text
Proposition 26Text
Proposition 27Text
DonationsVendors
Endorsements
Local measures
  • Proposition 11 barely passed and is flawed: "In 2008, Schwarzenegger raised and spent 16 million special-interest dollars to barely pass an obtuse bureaucratic Commission to take the power of redistricting from those who are accountable to the people and give it to a faceless group of amateurs."
  • California is suffering a host of problems that should be tended to prior to paying attention to how state legislative district lines are drawn
  • The members of the Citizens Redistricting Commission are not accountable to voters for the state legislative district boundary lines they draw, whereas the members of the California State Legislature are accountable to voters, and therefore the task of drawing their district boundary lines is better trusted to them.
  • "Proposition 27 mandates one person, one vote districts. Current law allows population variations of as much as 1,000,000 people per district!"
  • Proposition 27 allows voters to have the final say if they object to a specific redistricting plan by subjecting that plan to veto referendum.

Donors

Main article: Donations to California's 2010 ballot propositions

According to the California Secretary of State's office, there are three registered committees supporting Proposition 27[15].

  • Yes on Fair, Yes on 27: This committee has had a variety of names, but it is the primary, largest, and best funded committee supporting Proposition 27.[16] All the contributions shown in the table below are to this committee.
  • TruePAC - Concerned Citizens Including Judy Chu to Support Proposition 27: This group is funded with a single $500,000 contribution from the Judy Chu Campaign Committee 2010[17], which explains why some reports claim that Judy Chu contributed $500,000 in favor of Proposition. The actual value is $225,000. This group also made a single $90,000 contribution to the Yes on 27 committee, a $10,000 contribution to the California Democratic Party, made small contributions to various politicians and other ballot propositions, and then returned over $111,700 back to the Judy Chu Campaign Committee.[18]
  • California Coalition for Leadership and Accountability in Budget and Redistricting, Yes on 25 & 27, No on 20: This committee has received no funds as November 1, 2010[19].

Haim Saban loaned $2 million to the campaign in mid-April.[20] Saban is in the entertainment business and his personal fortune has been helped along by his association with the Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers.[21] Saban also has media holdings in Israel, Europe, Asia and the United States, including a major stake in Univision, a Spanish-language network.[22] Saban's donation to the effort to overturn Proposition 11 has raised eyebrows, because in 2008, he gave $200,000 to the campaign to pass Proposition 11.

Many of the donors are also big-money donors to the Democratic Party. Others, including Haim Saban, Fred Eychaner, George Soros, Edith Wasserman, Louise Gund, Jack C. Bendheim, Kathryn Hall, and George M. Marcus also contributed between $25,000 up to $25 million to the William J. Clinton Foundation.

Many of the donors supporting Proposition 27 were also major contributors[13] opposing California Proposition 77 (2005), seeking to defeat an earlier proposed redistricting plan. AFSCME spent more than $1,000,000 on both Proposition 77 and on Proposition 27. The largest contribution to No on Proposition 77 was $4,000,000 from Stephen Bing[23]'s Shangri-La Entertainment Company[24], a major contributor to 527 political organizations[25][26]. Stephen Bing is not a contributor to Yes on Proposition 27. However, it is interesting to note that Stephen Bing was the #1 top political contributor in 2002[27], joined by Haim Saban (#2), Fred Eychaner (#3), Peter G. Angelos (#8), and Louise Gund (#18), who funded both Yes on Proposition 27 and No on Proposition 77.

Through October 30, 2010, these donors have given $10,000 or more to the "Yes on FAIR, Yes on 27--A Coalition of Entrepreneurs, Working People, Businesses, Community Leaders Such as Karen Bass, and Other Concerned Citizens" campaign committee.

(Updated October 30, 2010)

Donor Amount
Haim Saban (Saban Capital Group, President) $2,000,000
American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) $1,250,000
American Federation of Teachers (AFT) $1,000,000
Working 4 Working Americans (associated with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners[28]) $500,000
Democratic State Central Committee of California $375,000
California State Council of Service Employees Political Issues Committee (SEIU) $200,000
TruePAC - Concerned Citizens Including Judy Chu to Support Proposition 27 $125,000
Charles Calderon for State Assembly Committee $100,000
George Soros $100,000
Peter G. Angelos (Attorney, Law Offices of Peter G. Angelos and majority owner of the Balitmore Orioles basebasll team) $100,000
Louise Gund $100,000
Edith Wasserman (Wasserman Foundation, Vice-President) $100,000
Fred Eychaner (Newsweb Corporation, Owner) $100,000
Zenith Insurance (Stanley R. Zax, President/Chairman of the Board) $100,000
International Association of Fire Fighters $100,000
Steven S. Myers (Dolphin Capital Holdings, Inc., Chairman/CEO) $100,000
Jack C. Bendheim (Phibro Animal Health Corp., President) $50,000
International Brotherhood of Electric Workers (IBEW) Educational Committee $50,000
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local No. 47 $50,000
California State Association of Electrical Workers $50,000
California State Pipe Trades Council of the United Association $50,000
Joseph W. Cotchett (Attorney with Cotchett, Piper & McCarthy) $25,000
Kathryn Hall (Hall Financial Group, Investor; Former Ambassador to Austria, appointed by President Clinton) $25,000
C. Paul Johnson (Astrale e Tierra Winery, CEO) $25,000
Stephen Grand (Grand-Sakwa Properties, real estate investor) $25,000
George M. Marcus (Marcus & Millichap, Chairman; University of California Regent appointed by former Governor Gray Davis) $25,000
Stewart Resnick (Roll International Corp., President and Chairman) $25,000
Plumbers & Pipefitters Local 447 $25,000
DRIVE Committee (The Teamsters Union) $25,000
Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians[29] $25,000
Lloyd Thomas Galloway (Attorney at Galloway & Associates) $20,000
Leadership for Today and Tomorrow, a Multi-Candidate Committee (affiliated with Xavier Becerra) $10,000
Michael M. Kassen[30] (Community Volunteer, Westport, CT) $10,000
Allied Telesis (San Jose, CA) $10,000
Thirty-O-Seven, Inc.[31][32] (Beverly Hills, CA) $10,000
Plumbers & Steamfitters Union No. 467 (Burlingame, CA) $10,000
Igor Pasternak[33] (Worldwide Aeros Corporation[34] (CEO), CA) $10,000
Solidarity PAC (affiliated with Congressman George Miller) $10,000

Note: "Working 4 Working Americans" is described by Capitol Weekly as "a Washington, D.C.-based, labor-backed group."[35]

Donations from Individuals

The following table lists the individuals that contributed $20,000 or more to the Yes on Proposition 27 campaign. Many of the top individual donors also are big-money donors to the Democratic Party. The table indicates

  • the individual donor's name, (ordered by contribution, then by last name)
  • the affiliation of the donor,
  • the dollar amount contributed to the Yes on Proposition 27 campaign[36][37],
  • whether the donor's address on record is within California or out-of-state,
  • whether the individual also contributed to the No on California Proposition 77 (2005) campaign[13]
  • the amount of money given in 2010 to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC),
  • the amount given in 2010 to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC),
  • the amount given in 2010 to the Democratic National Committee (DNC),
  • the amount given to the Clinton Foundation (provided only as a range where K = $1,000 and M = $1,000,000), and
  • the amount given to host the 2009 Obama Inauguration[38],
  • the affliation's position on the OpenSecrets.org Heavy Hitters List of Top All-Time Donors[39]
  • the percent of money that the affiliation gives to members of the Democratic Party (from Heavy Hitters List unless otherwise noted).

(Updated October 11, 2010)

Individual Affiliation $ Amount to
Yes on Proposition 27
Donor Address
in California?
Donor to
No on Proposition 77
(2005)?
$ Amount to
DSCC (2010)
$ Amount to
DCCC (2010)
$ Amount to
DNC (2010)
$ Amount to
Clinton Foundation
$ Amount to
Obama Inauguration
Affiliation's Position on OpenSecrets.org Heavy Hitters List Affiliation's % of Contributions Given to Democrats
Haim Saban[40][41][42][43][44][45][46][47][48] Saban Capital Group (Chairman/CEO) $2,000,000 Yes YES $34,400[49] $30,400 - $5M to $10M[50] - #85[51] 99%[52][53]
Peter G. Angelos[54][55] Offices of Peter G. Angelos (Attorney)
Baltimore Orioles baseball team (Majority Owner)[56]
$100,000 NO YES $40,400[57] - $30,200 - - - 94%[58]
Fred Eychaner[59][46][60] Newsweb Corporation[61] (Owner), Alphawood Foundation[62] (Founder and Chairman) $100,000 NO YES $30,400[63] - $15,200 $10M to $25M[64] $50,000 #100[65] 100%[66]
Louise Gund[67] Philanthropist, Louise Gund Foundation $100,000 NO YES $30,000[68] $30,400 - $50K to $100K[69] - - -
Steven S. Myers[70][71][72] Dolphin Capital Holdings, Inc. (Chairman/CEO)
SM&A (CEO, Retired)
$100,000 Yes No - $30,400 $60,400[73] - $300 - 52%[74]
George Soros[75][76][77][78][79] Soros Fund Management (Chairman) $100,000 NO No - $20,000[80] $15,200 $500K to $1M[81] $200,000
(includes relatives)
- 59%[82]
(36% other,
non-Repub.)
Edith Wasserman Retired, Wasserman Foundation (Vice-President)[83] $100,000 Yes YES $35,400[84] $30,400 - $5M to $10M[85] - - 91%[86]
Stanley R. Zax[87] Zenith Insurance (President/Chairman of the Board) $100,000 Yes No $10,000[88] $30,400 - - - - 91%[89]
Jack C. Bendheim Phibro Animal Health Corp. (President) $50,000 NO YES $15,000[90] $21,300 - $25K to $50K[91] - - 94%[92]
Joseph W. Cotchett Cotchett, Piper & McCarthy (Attorney) $25,000 Yes No $30,400[93] - - - - - 99%[94]
Stephen Grand Grand-Sakwa Properties (Real Estate Investor) $25,000 Yes YES - - - - - - -
Kathryn Hall[95] Hall Financial Group (Investor) $25,000 NO YES $33,600[96] - - $100K to $250K[97] $50,000 - 100%[98]
C. Paul Johnson Astrale e Terra, (CEO) $25,000 Yes YES - - $30,400[99] - $3,000 - 100%[100]
George M. Marcus[101] Marcus & Millichap (Chairman)
University of California (Regent)
$25,000 Yes YES - $45,600[102] - $250K to $500K[103] $15,000 - 91%[104]
Stewart Resnick[105][106][107][108][109][110] Roll International Corp. (President and Chairman) $25,000 Yes No - - $15,200[111] - - - 67%[112]
Lloyd Thomas Galloway Galloway & Associates (Attorney) $20,000 NO No - - - - - - 100%[113]

Donors Haim Saban and Fred Eychaner received prior attention for their multi-million dollar donations to the Democratic Party.[46]

Donor Haim Saban ...

  • was #6 on the 2000 top individual donors list[114], giving 99% to Democrats with contributions exceeded $1 million
  • was #2 on the 2002 top individual donors list[115], giving 100% to Democrats with contributions exceeded $9.3 million
  • is #27 on the 2010 top individual donors list[116] so far, giving 98% to Democrats,
  • also contributed $32,151 to oppose Proposition 20[117]

Donor Peter G. Angelos ...

  • was #18 on the 2008 top individual donors list[118], giving 99% to Democrats with contributions exceeded $263,000.
  • the #1 contributor to Nancy Pelosi's 2010 campaign.[119]
  • contributed $151,000 to a variety of 527 political committees[120]

Donor Fred Eychaner ...

  • is #11 on 2010 top individual political donors list[116], giving 34% to Democrats, 66% to Other, 0% to Republicans; contributions exceeded $265,000
  • is #7 on 2010 top contributors to 527 organizations[121] providing significant money for EMILY's List[122]
  • contributed over $5.77 million to a variety of 527 political committees[123]
  • hosted a 2008 fundraiser for then-candidate Barack Obama in his home[124]
  • donated the maximum-allowable $10,000 to the Clinton Legal Defense Fund[125]
  • was named to the Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts by President Obama[126]
  • also contributed $100,000 to oppose Proposition 20[117]

Donor Louise Gund ...

  • was #18 on 2002[115] top individual donors list, giving 100% to Democrats; contributions exceeded $1 million
  • is on the Board of Trustees with Earthjustice[127], former the Earth Justice Legal Defense Fund, or the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund
  • contributed over $1.38 million to a variety of 527 political committees[128]

Donor George Soros ...

  • tied for #2 on the 2008 top individual donors to 527 political committees[129], giving $5,000,000 to a variety of organizations.[130]
  • was #3 on the 2006 top individual donors to 527 political committees[131], giving $3,542,500 to a variety of organizations.[132]
  • was #1 on the 2004 top individual donors to 527 political committees[133], giving $23,700,000 to a variety of organizations.[134]
  • contributed over $32.5 million to a variety of 527 political committees[135]

Donor Kathryn Hall was named Ambassador to Austria by President Clinton.[136]

Donations from Unions

Various labor unions have contributed a total $3,325,000 to the Yes on Proposition 27 campaign as of October 21, 2010. The table shows ...

  • the name of the contributing organization,
  • the union's affiliation (sometimes, the contributing organization's name is purposely obscured),
  • the amount of money contributed to the Yes on Proposition 27 campaign[36][37],
  • the union's position on The Center for Responsive Politics (www.opensecrets.org) list of "Heavy Hitters," the largest political donors in the United States at the federal level[39] (the specific position on the list may vary from that published on October 21, 2010)
  • the percent of contributions that go to members of the Democratic Party[39]
  • the total union campaign contributions to the U.S. Congress Members that are also funding Yes on Proposition 27[137] (total career contributions exceed $4,383,700)
  • whether the union also contributed to the campaign agaist California Proposition 77 (2005), a previous redistricting proposition[13]
  • the amount of money contributed to the William J. Clinton Foundation

(Updated October 21, 2010)

Labor Union Affiliation $ Amount to
Yes on Proposition 27
Position on
OpenSecrets.org
Top Donors List
 % Dues Given to Democrats Nationally Total $
Congress Members
also funding
Proposition 27
Donor to
No on Proposition 77
(2005)?
$ Amount to
Clinton Foundation
American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) AFL-CIO $1,250,000 #2[138] 98% $864,200 YES $250K to $500K[139]
American Federation of Teachers (AFT) AFL-CIO $1,000,000 #13[140] 98% $332,400 No $100K to $250K[141]
Working for Working Americans[142][143] International Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners $500,000 #12[144] 89% $478,200 No -
California State Council of Service Employees Political Issues Committee Service Employees International Union (SEIU) $200,000 #11[145] 92% $348,900 YES $250K to $500[146]
International Association of Fire Fighters AFL-CIO $100,000 #47[147] 81% $182,800 YES -
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Educational Committee International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW),
AFL-CIO
$50,000 #7[148] 97% $784,500 YES $100K to $250K[149]
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local No. 47 International Brotherhood of Electric Workers (IBEW),
AFL-CIO
$50,000 #7[148] 97% $784,500 No $100K to $250K[149]
California State Association of Electrical Workers International Brotherhood of Electric Workers (IBEW) $50,000 #7[148] 97% $784,500 No $100K to $250K[149]
California State Pipe Trades Council of the United Association[150][151] Plumbers & Pipefitters Union, AFL-CIO $50,000 #44[152] 94% $451,100 No -
Plumbers & Pipefitters Local 447[153] Plumbers & Pipefitters Union, AFL-CIO $25,000 #44[152] 94% $451,100 No -
DRIVE Committee Teamsters Union $25,000 #10[154] 93% $691,000 No -
Pumbers & Steamfitters Union No. 467[155] Plumbers & Pipefitters Union, AFL-CIO $10,000 #44[152] 94% $451,100 No -

Nationally, the Service Employee International Union (SEIU) ...

  • was the #1 contributor to 527 political committees in 2004, totaling $53,352,07[156]
  • was the #1 contributor to 527 political committees in 2006, totaling $32,929,734[157]
  • was the #1 contributor to 527 political committees in 2008, totaling $36,708,275[158]
  • is the #1 contributor to 527 political committees in 2010 (to date), totaling $10,764,321[159]
  • spent over $133,000,000 on 527 political committees during the 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010 election cycles[160]

The California State Council of Service Employees union, part of the SEIU ...

  • was ranked the #2 overall spender in California politics, attempting to influence voters and public officials, by spending $107,467,272[161]
  • was second in spending only to the California Teachers Association (CTA)[161]

Politicians who are donors

Members of the U.S. Congress who are donors:

U.S. Congressperson Judy Chu, a $225,000 donor

Nineteen Democratic members of California’s delegation to the U.S. Congress, including Nancy Pelosi, cumulatively gave $175,000 to the initiative effort in February 2010, when the campaign needed funds to pay petition circulators to collect signatures to qualify the measure for the ballot.[162] Proposition 20, the Congressional Redistricting Initiative, which is also on the November 2, 2010 ballot in California is what motivated the round of donations from congressional representatives, according to some pundits.[163]

California has 54 seats in the U.S. Congress. Heading into the November 2, 2010 election, 34 of those seats are held by Democrats. As of October 30, 2001, 19 (nearly 56%) of those incumbent Democratic members of California's delegation to the U.S. Congress had given money to the campaign to urge a "yes" vote on Proposition 27.

No members of the state's other party delegations have, as of October 30, 2010, given money to the "Yes on 27" committee.

The 19 Democratic incumbent Congress Members who either gave money directly to the campaign, whose campaign committees gave money, or whose affiliated political action committee gave money to Proposition 27 are listed below. The table indicates ...

  • the Congress Member's name,
  • the Member's Congressional district,
  • the Member's party affiliation,
  • the amount of money contributed to Yes on Proposition 27[36][37],
  • whether the Congress Member is a current or former member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus,
  • whether the Congress Member also contributed[13] to the effort opposing a previous redistricting reform, California Proposition 77 (2005),
  • the amount of career campaign donations from the unions that also support Proposition 27[164] (union contributions to these Congress Members exceeds $4.3 million),
  • the percentage of campaign contributions from outside of California, according to Influence Explorer (a number greater than 50% indicates possible undue influence from out-of-state special interests),
  • the percentage of campaign contributions from Political Action Committees (PAC), as opposed to individual donors, according to Influence Explorer (a number greater than 50% indicates possible undue influence by special interests).

(Updated October 30, 2010)

Congress Member California
Congressional
District
Political
Party
$ Amount to
Yes on Proposition 27
Congressional
Progressive
Caucus
Member?
Donor to
No on
Proposition 77
(2005)?
Career Campaign $
from Unions
Supporting Proposition 27
 % Contributions from
Outside California
 % Contributions from
PACs
Xavier Becerra CA-31 Democrat $10,000[165] YES YES $250,500[166] 31%[167] 68%
Howard Berman CA-28 Democrat $10,000 No YES $126,500[168] 19%[169] 35%
Lois Capps CA-23 Democrat $10,000 No YES $387,000[170] 11%[171] 48%
Judy Chu CA-32 Democrat $225,000+ YES No $87,800[172] 4%[173] 31%
Anna Eshoo CA-14 Democrat $10,000 No YES $158,100[174] 13%[175] 54%
Sam Farr CA-17 Democrat $20,000 YES YES $354,200[176] 15%[177] 66%
Mike Honda CA-15 Democrat $10,000 YES YES $206,200[178] 23%[179] 42%
Barbara Lee CA-9 Democrat $10,000 YES YES $238,100[180] 17%[181] 39%
Zoe Lofgren CA-16 Democrat $10,000 No YES $191,000[182] 12%[183] 54%
Nancy Pelosi CA-28 Democrat $10,000 YES
(Former)
YES $347,400[184] 30%[185] 55%
Doris Matsui CA-5 Democrat $10,000 No No $108,000[186] 44%[187] 56%
George Miller CA-7 Democrat $10,000[188] YES YES $427,900[189] 52%[190] 68%
Laura Richardson CA-9 Democrat $5,000 YES No $155,800[191] 22%[192] 81%
Lucille Roybal-Allard CA-34 Democrat $10,000 YES YES $288,000[193] 24%[194] 58%
Linda Sanchez CA-39 Democrat $25,000 YES YES $184,800[195] 27%[196] 57%
Adam Schiff CA-29 Democrat $10,000 No YES $157,000[197] 13%[198] 41%
Jackie Speier CA-12 Democrat $10,000 No No $64,500[199] 4%[200] 31%
Diane Watson CA-33 Democrat $20,000 YES YES $147,000[201] 18%[202] 53%
Lynn Woolsey CA-6 Democrat $5,000 YES
(Co-Chair)
YES $504,200[203] 8%[204] 54%

The Congressional Progressive Caucus represents the progressive, liberal-leaning members of the Democratic Party.[205] Eleven of the 18 Congress Members (61%) are also current or former members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. Nancy Pelosi relinquished her membership upon being elected House Minority Leader[206].

Contribution attributed to Congresswoman Judy Chu include $10,000 from Judy Chu for Congress, $125,000 from TruePAC--Concerned Citizens including Judy Chu to Support Proposition 27, and $90,000 from Californians for Trust, Responsibility, Unity, and Empowerment PAC, whose contact person is Bill Wong, former Chief of Staff to Judy Chu[207] when she was a California State Assemblywoman. The donations from Judy Chu's husband[208], Assemblyman Mike Eng, are attributed only to him.

Congressman Xavier Becerra's contribution was via his affiliated leader political action committee, Leadership of Today & Tomorrow PAC[209].

Congressman George Miller's contribution was via his affiliated leader political action committee, Solidarity PAC[210].

Congresswoman Anna Eshoo provided a written statement on why she supports Proposition 27.

Congresswoman Laura Richardson was in the unenviable position of appearing in the "Most Corrupt Members of Congress" reports published in 2008[211], 2009[212], and 2010[213], published by the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW). The allegations against Congresswoman Richardson were ultimately dismissed by the House Ethics Committee, but not to the satisfaction of CREW.

Members of the California State Legislature who are donors:

State Rep. Charles Calderon, a $100,000 donor

Through October 12, 2010, eight members of the California State Legislature, all of whom are members of the Democratic Party, have donated money to the Proposition 27 campaign[36][37], either personally, through their state senate or state assembly campaign committee, or through a ballot measure campaign committee set up under their auspices with their name on it. The table indicates ...

  • the name of California Legislator,
  • the office held by the Legislator,
  • the Legislator's political party,
  • the amount of money contributed to Yes on Proposition 27[36][37], and
  • any major union campaign donors that may be associated with the Yes on Proposition 27 campaign. Other than AFSCME, these unions may be state affiliates of a national union.

(Updated October 30, 2010)

Politician Office held Party $ Amount to
Yes on Proposition 27
Major Union Campaign Donors Associated with
Yes on Proposition 27
Charles Calderon State Assembly, District 58 Democrat $100,000 Pipe Trades, Electrical Workers[214]
Mike Eng State Assembly, District 49 Democrat $100,000 Electrical Workers, Teachers[215]
Bob Blumenfield State Assembly, District 40 Democrat $85,000 Carpenters, Pipe Trades, Teachers[216]
Alex Padilla State Senate, District 20 Democrat $60,572 Electrical Workers, Pipe Trades, Fire Fighters, Carpenters, AFSCME[217]
Karen Bass State Assembly, District 47 Democrat $50,000 Carpenters, Pipe Trades, Electrical Workers, Teachers[218]
John Perez State Assembly, District 46 Democrat $49,000 Electrical Workers, Carpenters, Pipe Trades, Fire Fighters[219]
Nancy Skinner State Assembly, District 14 Democrat $35,000 Pipe Trades, Electrical Workers[220]
Felipe Fuentes State Assembly, District 39 Democrat $30,000 Pipe Trades[221]
Bill Monning State Assembly, District 27 Democrat $5,000 Pipe Trades, Electrical Workers, Firefighters, Teachers[222]

NOTE: Mike Eng is husband[208] of U.S. Congresswoman Judy Chu, the largest contributor to Proposition 27 among U.S. Congress Members.

See also: Vendors and consultants to California's 2010 ballot proposition campaigns

Political consultants who provided paid services to the "Yes on 27" campaign included:

Opposition

Opponents

  • John Diaz, the editorial page editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, has written, " The proposed ballot language for the Financial Accountability in Redistricting Act makes the laughably absurd argument that this is about money: That a state facing an "unprecedented economic crisis" with a political leadership that "has failed us" cannot afford the cost of outsourcing this duty to a commission. A more honest title of this initiative, which is being conceived by a small group of Democratic insiders, would be the Incumbent Protection Act."[223]
  • The editorial board of the Daily Breeze recommends that the publication's readers refrain from signing the petition to put this measure on the ballot, saying, "...staying in office and party control of seats has become more important than representing the people who gave them those seats in the first place."[224]
  • Ian Johnson of The Rose Institute of State and Local Government at Claremont McKenna College says, "The California Democratic redistricting machine is worried. Led by Congressman Howard Berman and his consultant brother Michael, they controlled the state’s bipartisan incumbent-protection gerrymander in 2001. Now their control is threatened by an initiative that would place Congressional redistricting within the mandate of the Citizens Redistricting Commission. Congressman Berman and his allies are responding with a misleading measure aimed at confusing voters, apparently conceding that they cannot win the debate on the merits of their views...In one respect, FAIR is a positive sign: when the beneficiaries of the status quo are forced to resort to deception to preserve their positions, it is a sign they are desperate. Clearly, even they can see which way the winds of change are blowing."[225]
  • John Kabateck, executive director of the California branch of the National Federation of Independent Business. He says, "Enough is enough. Decades of cynical, self-serving behavior from politicians has helped plummet this state into a fiscal and economic abyss. We need to be able to hold our elected officials accountable when they don’t do the job we elected them to do. One way to ensure that politicians remain accountable to voters is by taking the power to draw political district lines from the very politicians who stand to personally benefit from the outcome."[226]

Arguments against

Yes20No27.jpg

Arguments were submitted to the official California Voter Guide urging a "no" vote on Proposition 27, as were rebuttals to the arguments provided by Prop 27 supporters. The signers of these arguments were:

  • Kathay Feng, the executive director of California Common Cause
  • Ruben Guerra, president of the Latin Business Association
  • Joel Fox, president of the Small Business Action Committee
  • Janis R. Hirohama, president of the League of Women Voters of California
  • David Pacheco, president of the California branch of the AARP
  • Gary Toebben, president of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

The themes of the main arguments they make against Proposition 27 (and in favor of Proposition 20) are:

  • Proposition 27, if it succeeds in repealing Proposition 11, will protect the power of political incumbents: "POLITICIANS behind Proposition 27 are very angry that voters took away their power to draw districts to guarantee their re-election when VOTERS passed Proposition 11 and established the independent Citizens Redistricting Commission. That’s why the politicians and special interests will spend millions to pass 27 and ELIMINATE THE CITIZENS COMMISSION, comprised of voters from around the state."
  • The opponents of Proposition 27 agree wholeheartedly with the supporters of Proposition 27 that California is rife with many problems. However, Proposition 27 opponents say that these problems should be laid squarely at the feet of the very politicians who are trying to undo the California Citizens Redistricting Commission so that the politicians can be put back in charge of deciding where their legislative district boundaries should be drawn after ten years after the U.S. Census:
  • The idea that state legislative incumbents place an excessively high value on being able to control where their legislative district boundaries are drawn every ten years is well-illustrated by a report in the Los Angeles Times that in the redistricting that took place after the 2000 Census, one political consultant was paid over $1,000,000 by allies of incumbent state legislators to draw districts that best protected their ability to win another term. "With Proposition 27, politicians want to return us to the days when legislators hired consultants to draw bizarrely-shaped districts behind closed doors, dividing up cities and communities just to guarantee their re-election."
  • The assertions that Proposition 27 supporters make about how Proposition 27 will save money is a way to "mislead voters with ridiculous claims." Rather, Proposition 27 opponents argue, "Proposition 27 is not about saving money. Politicians want safe districts and will spend every taxpayer and special interest dollar they can to bankroll consultants and draw district lines to protect themselves."
  • The assertion that Proposition 27 supporters make about how, if voters approve Proposition 27, voters will be able to subject any legislative redistricting plan that the California State Legislature proposes to the veto referendum process is misleading, because voters can already do that: "Voters can ALREADY reject legislative redistricting plans through the referendum process, regardless of Proposition 27."
  • The idea put forward by Proposition 27 supporters that members of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission will be able to personally enrich themselves through their service on the board is "mislead[ing]" and "ridiculous": "The voter-approved citizens commission ONLY DRAWS MAPS ONCE EVERY TEN YEARS and commissioners make only a modest stipend per day when they work. That’s why taxpayer and good government groups support the Commission and oppose 27."

Gerrymandering: The Movie

Map of U.S. Congressional District 23

As part of the opposition campaign against Proposition, the "Yes on 20, No on 27" campaign distributed mailers containing a DVD copy of the documentary, Gerrymandering: The Movie. The movie describes the arcane and politically-charged practice of drawing political boundaries. Strangely drawn districts designed to favor one particular candidate is a practice called Gerrymandering. The movie features the efforts of Kathay Feng of Common Cause to pass the 2005 Proposition 11 ballot measure and the 2003 Texas redistricting battle where Texas Democrats fled the state to avoid a vote on a redistricting plan that favored Republicans, drawn by the Republican-dominated Texas State Legislature. Redistricting in the California State Legislature is similar, where Democrats presently hold a nearly 2-to-1 majority over California Republicans.

The California 2001 redistricting process led to the creation of a number of districts whose meandering borders have attracted particular attention by observers who believe that the districts were designed to support the odds of re-election for incumbent politicians. Nine districts in particular have drawn attention:

  • The CA-23 district map is said to be the best example of a highly-Gerrymandered district, covering just select coastal communities. The district is 200 miles long and only 100 yards wide in some places. Voters joke that it sometimes disappears during high tide.
  • The CA-28 district map shows Gerrymandering through Van Nuys. Some jokingly refer to its shape as a drooling Ronald Reagan wearing a scarf.
  • The CA-29 district map carefully picks and chooses it way through Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena, and Alhambra.
  • The CA-15 district map meanders its way through select portions of Silicon Valley and surrounding neighborhoods.

Donors against

Main article: Donations to California's 2010 ballot propositions

The only committee directly opposing Proposition 27 was called "No on 27 - Keep Voters First, a Coalition of Good Government Groups" with a single $20,000 contribution from the California Forward Action Issues Fund and $516 in non-monetary contributions from Governor Schwarzenegger's California Dream Team.[227][228]

However, there was also a committee called "Yes on 20, No on 27--Hold Politicians Accountable, A Coalition of Taxpayers, Seniors, Good Government Groups, Small Business and Community Organizers" whose aim was to pass Proposition 20, a competing ballot measure, and defeat Proposition 27. Because Proposition 20 contains "poison pill" language countering Proposition 27, any money spent to promote a "Yes" vote on Proposition 20 might be considered money spent to oppose Proposition 27, and vice versa.

Charles T. Munger, Jr. and his wife Charlotte Lowell were the primary driving force behind Proposition 20 and were also the main source of campaign contributions to that proposition.[229] Charles T. Munger, Jr. is the son of Charles T. Munger, Sr., a Vice-President at Berkshire Hathaway.

Donors of $20,000 and over to Yes on 20, No on 27 through October 21 are listed below. The table shows ...

  • the name of the individual or organization,
  • the affiliation to another organization,
  • the amount of money contributed to "Yes on 20, No on 27,"[230][231]
  • whether the donor address is within California.[230][231]

(Updated October 21, 2010)

Individual/Organization Affiliation $ Amount to
Yes on Proposition 20
No on Proposition 27
Donor Address
in California?
Charles T. Munger, Jr.[232] Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (Physicist), Self-Employed $11,177,603 YES
Charolette A. Lowell Attorney, Self-Employed $956,001 YES
Diane B. Wisely[233] A. Wisely Properties (Executive) $100,000 YES
California Business Political Action Committee (CALBUSPAC) California Chamber of Commerce $85,000 YES
William Bloomfield Retired $50,000 YES
Susan L. Groff Northwest Excavating (Contractor) $50,000 YES
Rebecca Q. Moran Retired $50,000 YES
Geoffrey C. Rusack Attorney $20,000 YES
Small Business Political Action Committee - $20,000 YES

All major donors to "Yes on 20, No on 27" are from California, unlike the donors supporting Proposition 27.

Editorial opinion

See also: Endorsements of California ballot measures, 2010
Redistricting on the ballot in 2010
Nevada 2010 ballot measuresUtah 2010 ballot measuresColorado Fetal Personhood, Amendment 62 (2010)New Mexico 2010 ballot measuresArizona 2010 ballot measuresMontana 2010 ballot measuresCalifornia 2010 ballot measuresOregon 2010 ballot measuresWashington 2010 ballot measuresIdaho 2010 ballot measuresOklahoma 2010 ballot measuresKansas 2010 ballot measuresNebraska 2010 ballot measuresSouth Dakota 2010 ballot measuresNorth Dakota 2010 ballot measuresIowa 2010 ballot measuresMissouri 2010 ballot measuresArkansas 2010 ballot measuresLouisiana 2010 ballot measuresAlabama 2010 ballot measuresGeorgia 2010 ballot measuresFlorida 2010 ballot measuresSouth Carolina 2010 ballot measuresIllinois 2010 ballot measuresTennessee 2010 ballot measuresNorth Carolina 2010 ballot measuresIndiana 2010 ballot measuresOhio 2010 ballot measuresMaine 2010 ballot measuresVirginia 2010 ballot measuresMaryland 2010 ballot measuresMaryland 2010 ballot measuresRhode Island 2010 ballot measuresRhode Island 2010 ballot measuresMassachusetts 2010 ballot measuresMichigan 2010 ballot measuresMichigan 2010 ballot measuresAlaska Parental Notification Initiative, Ballot Measure 2 (2010)Hawaii 2010 ballot measuresCertified, redistricting, 2010 Map.png
Newspaper Recommended Vote
on Proposition 27
Bakersfield Californian NO
Contra Costa Times NO
Fresno Bee NO
L.A. Weekly NO
Lompoc Record NO
Long Beach Press-Telegram NO
Los Angeles Daily News NO
Los Angeles Times NO
Marin Independent Journal NO
Monterey Herald NO
North County Times NO
Oakland Tribune NO
Orange County Register NO
Riverside Press-Enterprise NO
Sacramento Bee NO
San Bernardino Sun NO
San Diego Union-Tribune NO
San Francisco Bay Guardian YES
San Francisco Chronicle NO
San Francisco Examiner NO
San Gabriel Valley Tribune NO
San José Mercury-News NO
Santa Cruz Sentinel NO
Santa Rosa Press-Democrat NO
USA TODAY Implied NO
Ventura County Star NO
Washington Post Implied NO

Yes on Prop 27

Newspapers that have editorialized in favor of Proposition 27 include:

  • San Francisco Bay Guardian: "This measure abolishes that panel and would allow the Legislature to draw new lines for both state and federal offices after the 2010 census. We don't love having the Legislature handle that task — but we like the existing, unaccountable, unrepresentative agency even less."[234]

No on Prop 27

Newspapers that have editorialized against Proposition 27 include:

  • San Bernardino Sun: "Proposition 27 is not drawing as much attention as some of the other statewide measures on the Nov. 2 ballot. That's too bad, because marking No on Proposition 27 might be the most important thing voters can do for California's future."[235]
  • Contra Costa Times: "It is telling that there is no coherent argument in the voter's guide in support of Proposition 27; that's because there is none to be made."[236]
  • Lompoc Record: "Proposition 27 would abolish the state’s redistricting commission — before it has even had a chance to act — turning the authority for drawing boundaries for state offices back over to politicians. We really shouldn’t have to make an argument for why politicians have no business feathering their own nests, but we will."[237]
  • Los Angeles Daily News: "Independent redistricting is one of the last best hopes for the fixing the state's broken political process."[238]
  • The Los Angeles Times: "Proponents of the proposition smugly titled it the Financial Accountability in Redistricting Act, and they argue that it will save money — that California cannot, in this hour of fiscal crisis, afford the 14-member commission and the staff required to carry out its duties. That's fraudulent, and they know it. California's crisis is real, but the citizens commission is an antidote, not a contributor."[239]
  • The Long Beach Press-Telegram: "Politicians despise the independent commission because they no longer get to choose their own voters and keep seats safe for their parties. This is particularly true of Democrats because they currently hold more of those seats than Republicans. They fought the redistricting proposal in 2008, and now they're bankrolling Proposition 27 on the November ballot to kill the commission before it has even begun its work. Californians must reject this unconscionable power grab by voting yes on Proposition 20 and no on Proposition 27."[240]
  • The Orange County Register: "Voters should be careful not to confuse Proposition 20, which we view as the 'good' redistricting proposition, with Proposition 27, the 'bad' redistricting proposition. Proposition 27 would essentially undo the good work of 2008's Proposition 11 for state offices, hamstring Proposition 20 for congressional offices and further entrench the power of politicians to pick their own districts. Proposition 27 would end the establishment of more balanced voting districts before they even are created."[241]
  • Riverside Press Enterprise: "California has no reason to backtrack on governmental reforms. The dismal records of state and federal legislators should spur voters to expand changes that can improve government, not toss the whole effort out. Thus in November voters should pass Proposition 20, and reject Proposition 27."[242]
  • San Bernardino Sun: "The campaign finance reports for Proposition 27 tell the story. The vast majority of the $1 million-plus in donations come from current or aspiring Democratic members of Congress and their supporters, who fear losing power."[244]
  • Sacramento Bee: "Supporters of Proposition 27 make the same arguments they did against Proposition 11, with the added criticism that the panel selection process is over budget. Their case is just as unconvincing this time. The citizen commission holds the promise of creating legislative districts that are more competitive and that will give more California voters a real choice. It should be given the chance to succeed.[245]
  • North County Times: "Proposition 27 would abolish the Citizens Redistricting Commission and restore redistricting to the Legislature. Well, the Legislature had that power for decades, and used it to draw districts designed to protect incumbents. Boundaries were crafted not to create balanced districts, but rather districts that tilt heavily toward one party or the other."[246]
  • Santa Rosa Press Democrat: "The backers of Proposition 27, primarily the state's congressional delegation, included an artificial spending cap so they could claim this is a cost-cutting measure. Don't be fooled. In addition to losing an independent process, there will be a ample special interest money, from groups that benefit from the status quo, to more than make up for a tiny cut in public spending on the once-a-decade redistricting process.."[247]
  • Santa Cruz Sentinel: "Politicians naturally have been unhappy about losing this power. The Democratic Party, the majority party in our state, is mainly bankrolling Proposition 27, which would end the commission before it has even started. Why? Because some politicians could lose their seats. Others might be forced to run against credible opposition candidates, which could mean they would have to move more toward positions benefiting all Californians, rather than narrow party or special interests."[248]
  • San Gabriel Valley Tribune: "But Proposition 27, which citizens will cast their votes on Nov. 2, would be an easy one to paint as the most scurrilous proposition this time around. It would take the excellent redistricting reforms Californians approved as Proposition11 two years ago and trash them, going back to the perfectly awful status quo."[249]
  • Ventura County Star: "Proposition 27 would eliminate the citizens’ commission altogether and return all — all — redistricting duties back to the politicians’ cronies in the state Legislature Supporters of Proposition 27 claim it would save money, but we seriously doubt that any meaningful savings would ever materialize if voters let politicians have their way. That’s how California got to where we are today."[250]
  • Washington Post: "... Proposition 27, would be an unfortunate step in the opposite direction, abolishing the commission altogether, on the dubious claim that the state can't afford the commission because of its fiscal crisis. Shamefully, the state's leading Democrats are behind the push for Proposition 27; House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and 17 other Democratic members of the state's congressional delegation each contributed at least $10,000 to the cause."[251]

Campaign finance complaint

Supporters of the Voters FIRST Act for Congress have asked the Fair Political Practices Commission and the Federal Election Commission to investigate whether some members of California's U.S. Congressional delegation are "hiding their controlling involvement in the initiative" in a way that obscures who is really behind it.[226]

Path to the ballot

Clipboard48.png
See also: California signature requirements

On December 28, 2009, Daniel Lowenstein filed a request with the Office of the California Attorney General for an official ballot title.

The official ballot title was provided on February 5, 2010.

Signatures to qualify the measure for the ballot were collected by Kimball Petition Management at a cost of $$3,031,085.[252]

See also: 2010 ballot measure petition signature costs

See also

External links

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

Basic information


Supporters

See also: 2010 ballot measure campaign websites

Opponents

See also: 2010 ballot measure campaign websites

Additional reading

References

  1. Desert Dispatch, "State redistricting opponents regroup," January 10, 2010
  2. 2.0 2.1 KQED-TV, "Give Redistricting Back To Legislature?," December 29, 2009
  3. California Secretary of State, "Maps: Proposition 27, Eliminate State Redistricting Commission"
  4. Manta Company Listings, "Berman & D'Agostino Campaigns, Michael Berman Inc."
  5. Sacramento Bee, "Ballot fight looms on California redistricting," January 18, 2010
  6. Election Law Blog, ""NO ON 77" WHITE PAPER," September 30, 2005
  7. 'The Journal of Law & Politics', The Stealth Campaign: Experimental Studies of Slate Mail in California, Spring 2001
  8. 'Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review', Election Law as a Subject, June 1999
  9. Mother Jones, "Gerrymandering: Why Your Vote Doesn't Count", September, 2006
  10. Christian Science Monitor, "Redistricting abuses voter trust", January 7, 2002
  11. The Orange County Register, "Editorial: Proposition 27 would strangle redistricting reform in the cradle", September 3, 2010
  12. CNN, "Linda and Loretta Sanchez: First sisters in Congress"
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: A COALITION OF LEGAL EXPERTS, FILMMAKERS, BUSINESSMEN, AND WORKING PEOPLE. MAJOR FUNDING BY SHANGRI-LA ENTERTAINMENT, LLC & AMERICAN FAMILY VOICES - NO ON 77 "
  14. 14.0 14.1 Letter to Attorney General requesting ballot title
  15. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: PROPOSITION 027 - ELIMINATES STATE COMMISSION ON REDISTRICTING. CONSOLIDATES AUTHORITY FOR REDISTRICTING WITH ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES. "
  16. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: YES ON FAIR, YES ON 27--A COALITION OF ENTREPERNEURS, WORKING PEOPLE, BUSINESSES, COMMUNITY LEADERS SUCH AS KAREN BASS, AND OTHER CONCERNED CITIZENS DEVOTED TO ELIMINATING BUREAUCRATIC WASTE OF TAX... ", general information.
  17. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: TRUEPAC - CONCERNED CITIZENS INCLUDING JUDY CHU TO SUPPORT PROPOSITION 27", contributions received.
  18. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: TRUEPAC - CONCERNED CITIZENS INCLUDING JUDY CHU TO SUPPORT PROPOSITION 27", expenditures made.
  19. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: CALIFORNIA COALITION FOR LEADERSHIP AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN BUDGET AND REDISTRICTING, YES ON 25 & 27, NO ON 20," contributions received
  20. Sacramento Bee, "Schwarzenegger fights to protect his climate-change and redistricting legacy," April 26, 2010
  21. Sacramento Bee, "Haim Saban loans $2 million to effort to repeal Proposition 11," April 12, 2010
  22. Sacramento Bee, "Donors give millions, hide their motives," April 18, 2010
  23. Influence Explorer, "S. Bing Profile"
  24. Influence Explorer, "Shangri-La Entertainment"
  25. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2004 Election Cycle", #3 on list.
  26. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2008 Election Cycle", #4 on list.
  27. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributor, 2002"
  28. OpenSecrets, "Working for Working Americans: Top Contributors, 2008 Cycle"
  29. Influence Explorer, "Santa Ynez Band/Chumash Mission Indians Profile"
  30. CampaignMoney.com, "Michael Kassen". A major contributor to a variety of Republican and Democratic candidates over the years. See
  31. There is no web address or much information for Thirty-O-Seven, Inc. They have made previous political contributions (see other references) in prior races. They contributed to No. on Proposition 77. According to the California Secretary of State's Office, Thirty-O-Seven is a valid California corporation since September 1999, number C2146159. The address on record is '100 N. CRESCENT DRIVE, SUITE 218, BEVERLY HILLS CA 90210', which according to Google Maps is 0.9 miles from the offices of Berman & D'Agostino Campaigns.
  32. [http://www.city-data.com/elec2/00/elec-BEVERLY-HILLS-CA-00-part4.html City-Data.com, "BEVERLY-HILLS, California (CA) Political Contributions by Individuals," $25,000 contribution to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, February 11, 2000.
  33. CampaignMoney.com, "Igor Pasternak Profile"
  34. Influence Explorer, "Aeros Profile"
  35. Capitol Weekly, "Incumbent Democrats open wallets to abolish redistricting commission," September 2, 2010
  36. 36.0 36.1 36.2 36.3 36.4 California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: YES ON FAIR, YES ON 27--A COALITION OF ENTREPERNEURS, WORKING PEOPLE, BUSINESSES, COMMUNITY LEADERS SUCH AS KAREN BASS, AND OTHER CONCERNED CITIZENS DEVOTED TO ELIMINATING BUREAUCRATIC WASTE OF TAX..."
  37. 37.0 37.1 37.2 37.3 37.4 ElectionTrack.com, "Contributions to Yes On Fair, Yes On 27--a Coalition Of Entreperneurs, Working People, Businesses, Community Leaders Such As Karen Bass, And Other Concerned Citizens Devoted To Eliminating Bureaucratic Waste Of Tax..."
  38. OpenSecrets, "Barack Obama Inauguration Donors"
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Top All-Time Donors, 1989-2010"
  40. Wikipedia, "Haim Saban"
  41. NNDB, "Haim Saban Profile"
  42. SourceWatch.org, "Haim Saban Pofile"
  43. CorporationWiki.com, "Haim Saban Profile"
  44. Influence Explorer, "Haim Saban Profile"
  45. Los Angeles Times, "Saban gives $2 million to change redistricting law"
  46. 46.0 46.1 46.2 New York Times, "Soft Money Lives: Democrats Take In $12 Million (2 Gifts)", March, 2002
  47. Los Angeles Times, "Haim Saban, friend to Israel and Democrats"
  48. Portfolio Magazine, "Haim Saban, Power Ranger"
  49. CampaignMoney.com, "Haim Saban Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  50. Haim Saban and The Saban Family Foundation donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  51. OpenSecrets, "Saban Captial Group Profile"
  52. Influence Explorer, "Saban Capital Group Profile"
  53. Influence Explorer, "Saban Entertainment Profile"
  54. Wikipedia, "Peter Angelos"
  55. Influence Explorer, "Peter G. Angelos Profile"
  56. Los Angeles Times, "Pro football: Orioles' majority owner, leading figure in Baltimore's effort to attract an NFL team, is in Los Angeles for informal meetings.", May 13, 1994
  57. CampaignMoney.com, "Peter G. Angelos Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  58. Influence Explorer, "Law Offices of Peter G Angelos Profile"
  59. Influence Explorer, "Fred Eychaner Profile"
  60. Forbes, "The Forbes 400: A Long Strange Trip," September 30, 2002
  61. Wikipedia, "Newsweb Corproation"
  62. Aidpage, "Alphawood Foundation Profile"
  63. CampaignMoney.com, "Fred Eychaner Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  64. Fred Eychaner donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  65. OpenSecrets, "Newsweb Corp. Group Profile"
  66. Influence Explorer, "Newsweb Corporation Profile"
  67. Oregon Shakespeare Festival, "Meet the Board: Louise Gund"
  68. CampaignMoney.com, "Louise Gund Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  69. Louise Gund donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  70. Forbes, "Steven S. Myers Profile"
  71. the full wiki, "Steven Myers"
  72. CorporationWiki, "Steven S. Myers"
  73. CampaignMoney.com, "Steven Myer Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  74. Influence Explorer, "Dolphin Capital Holding Profile"
  75. Wikipedia, "George Soros"
  76. NNDB, "George Soros Profile"
  77. SourceWatch.org, "George Soros Pofile"
  78. DiscoverTheNetworks.org, "George Soros Profile"
  79. OpenSecrets, "Capital Rivals: Koch Brothers vs. George Soros"
  80. CampaignMoney.com, "George Soros Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  81. Soros Foundation donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  82. Influence Explorer, "Soros Fund Management Profile"
  83. Wasserman Foundation ActivistCash.com, "Wasserman Foundation Profile"
  84. CampaignMoney.com, "Edith Wasserman Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  85. Wasserman Foundation donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  86. Influence Explorer, "Wasserman Foundation Profile"
  87. CorporationWiki, "Stanley R. Zax"
  88. CampaignMoney.com, "Stanley Zax Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  89. Influence Explorer, "Zenith Insurance Profile"
  90. CampaignMoney.com, "Jack Bendheim Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  91. Jack C. Bendheim donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  92. Influence Explorer, "Phibro Animal Health Profile"
  93. CampaignMoney.com, "Joseph W. Cotchett Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  94. Influence Explorer, "Cotchett, Piper & McCarthy Profile"
  95. CorporationWiki, "Kathryn Hall Profile"
  96. CampaignMoney.com, "Kathryn Hall Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  97. Kathryn and Craig Hall donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  98. Influence Explorer, "Hall Financial Group Profile"
  99. Huffington Post, "C. Paul Johnson Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  100. Influence Explorer, "Astrale e Terra Winery Profile"
  101. CorporationWiki, "George M. Marcus Profile"
  102. CampaignMoney.com, "George Marcus Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  103. George M. Marcus donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  104. Influence Explorer, "Marcus & Millichap Profile"
  105. NNDB, "Stewart A. Resnick Profile"
  106. SourceWatch.org, "Stewart A. Resnick Proifle"
  107. CorporationWiki, "Stewart A. Resnick"
  108. Political Friendster, "Stewart Resnick"
  109. Muckety.com, "Stewart A. Resnick"
  110. Influence Explorer, "Stewart Resnick"
  111. CampaignMoney.com, "Stewart Resnick Political Campaign Contributions 2010 Election Cycle"
  112. Influence Explorer, "Roll International Profile"
  113. Influence Explorer, "Galloway & Associates Profile"
  114. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors 2000"
  115. 115.0 115.1 OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors 2002"
  116. 116.0 116.1 OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors 2010"
  117. 117.0 117.1 California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: NO ON 20"
  118. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors 2008"
  119. OpenSecrets, "Top 20 Campaign Contributors to Congresswomman Nancy Pelosi, 2009-2010"
  120. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Donations by Peter Angelos"
  121. OpenSecrets, "Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2010 Election Cycle"
  122. OpenSecrets, "Contribution to EMILY's List Political Action Committee Raises Questions of Legality And Hints of Things to Come"
  123. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Donations by Fred Eychaner"
  124. Chicago Sun-Times, "Michelle Obama predicts her husband will be 'amazing' in debate"
  125. Washington Post, "Donors Who Gave $10,000 to Clinton Legal Defense Fund"
  126. The Hill, "Appointments"
  127. Earthjustice, "Board of Trustees"
  128. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Donations by Louise Gund"
  129. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2008 Election Cycle"
  130. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: George Soros Contributions to 527 Organizations, 2008 cycle"
  131. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2006 Election Cycle"
  132. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: George Soros Contributions to 527 Organizations, 2006 cycle"
  133. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Individual Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2004 Election Cycle"
  134. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: George Soros Contributions to 527 Organizations, 2004 cycle"
  135. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Donations by George Soros"
  136. Council of American Ambassadors, "Kathryn Walt Hall, Ambassadorial Post"
  137. Soquel by the Creek, "Union Funding to Proposition 27 Members of Congress during Career," accessed 21-OCT-2010
  138. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: American Fedn of St/Cnty/Munic Employees"
  139. AFSCME donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  140. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: American Federation of Teachers"
  141. AFT donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  142. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Working for Working Americans: Top Contributors, 2008 Cycle"
  143. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Working for Working Americans: Overview"
  144. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Carpenters & Joiners Union"
  145. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Service Employees International Union"
  146. New York's Health & Human Service Union, 1199/SEIU donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  147. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: International Assn of Fire Fighters"
  148. 148.0 148.1 148.2 OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Intl Brotherhood of Electrical Workers"
  149. 149.0 149.1 149.2 International Brotherhood of Electric Workers donation to William J. Clinton Foundation
  150. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Plumbers & Pipefitters Union Affiliates"
  151. OpenSecrets, "PACS: California State Pipe Trades Council"
  152. 152.0 152.1 152.2 OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Plumbers/Pipefitters Union"
  153. OpenSecrets, "PACS: Plumbers/Pipefitters Union Local 447"
  154. OpenSecrets, "HEAVY HITTERS: Teamsters Union"
  155. OpenSecrets, "PACS: Plumbers/Pipefitters Union Local 467"
  156. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2004 Election Cycle"
  157. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2006 Election Cycle"
  158. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2008 Election Cycle"
  159. OpenSecrets, "527S ORGANIZATIONS: Top Contributors to Federally Focused 527 Organizations, 2010 Election Cycle"
  160. Soquel by the Creek, "The Big Spenders Behind the Scenes"
  161. 161.0 161.1 California Fair Political Practices Commission, "Big Money Talks: California's Billion Dollar Club", page 10, "The 15 That Spent $1 Billion to Influence California Voters and Public Officials"
  162. From The Capitol, "Redistricting Commission repeal gets boost from House Dems," February 2, 2010
  163. Los Angeles Times, "Nancy Pelosi, congressional Democrats, weigh in on redistricting measure," February 12, 2010
  164. Soquel by the Creek"," "Union Funding to Proposition 27 Members of Congress During Career"
  165. OpenSecrets, "PACS: Leadership of Today & Tomorrow". The Leadership of Today & Tomorrow PAC is affiliated with Congressman Xavier Becerra
  166. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Xavier Becerra during Career"
  167. Influence Explorer, "Xavier Becerra Profile"
  168. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Howard L. Berman during Career"
  169. Influence Explorer, "Howard L. Berman Profile"
  170. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Lois Capps during Career"
  171. Influence Explorer, "Lois Capps Profile"
  172. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Judy Chu during Career"
  173. Influence Explorer, "Judy Chu Profile"
  174. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Anna Eshoo during Career"
  175. Influence Explorer, "Anna Eshoo Profile"
  176. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Sam Farr during Career"
  177. Influence Explorer, "Sam Farr Profile"
  178. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Mike Honda during Career"
  179. Influence Explorer, "Mike Honda Profile"
  180. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Barbara Lee during Career"
  181. Influence Explorer, "Barbara Lee Profile"
  182. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Zoe Lofgren during Career"
  183. Influence Explorer, "Zoe Lofgren Profile"
  184. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Nancy Pelosi during Career"
  185. Influence Explorer, "Nancy Pelosi Profile"
  186. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Doris Matsui during Career"
  187. Influence Explorer, "Doris Matsui Profile"
  188. OpenSecrets, "PACS: Solidarity PAC". The Solidarity PAC is affiliated with Congressman George Miller
  189. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to George Miller during Career"
  190. Influence Explorer, "George Miller Profile"
  191. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Laura Richardson during Career"
  192. Influence Explorer, "Laura Richardson Profile"
  193. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Lucille Roybal-Allard during Career"
  194. Influence Explorer, "Lucille Roybal-Allard Profile"
  195. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Linda Sanchez during Career"
  196. Influence Explorer, "Linda Sanchez Profile"
  197. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Adam Schiff during Career"
  198. Influence Explorer, "Adam Schiff Profile"
  199. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Jackie Speier during Career"
  200. Influence Explorer, "Jackie Speier Profile"
  201. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Diane Watson during Career"
  202. Influence Explorer, "Diane Watson Profile"
  203. OpenSecrets, "Top Contributors to Lynn Woolsey during Career"
  204. Influence Explorer, "Lynn Woolsey Profile"
  205. Congressional Progressive Caucus, "About," accessed April 29, 2014
  206. Wikipedia.org, "Congressional Progressive Caucus: Former Members"
  207. Bill Wong Bio
  208. 208.0 208.1 Politico, "The Arena: Rep. Judy Chu"
  209. OpenSecrets, "Xavier Becerra profile"
  210. OpenSecrets, "George Miller profile"
  211. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), "CREW's Most Corrupt Members of Congress: The 20 most corrupt Members of Congress (and four to watch)," pp. 234-237
  212. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), "CREW's Most Corrupt: The 15 most corrupt Members of Congress," pp. 110-114
  213. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), "CREW's Most Corrupt: Unfinished Business", p. 16.
  214. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Charles Calderon"
  215. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Mike Eng"
  216. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Bob Blumenfield"
  217. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Alex Padilla"
  218. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Karen Bass"
  219. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding John Perez"
  220. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Nancy Skinner"
  221. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Funding Felipe Fuentes"
  222. MapLight.org, "Top 10 Individual Contributors Bill Monning"
  223. San Francisco Chronicle, "Legislators cling to their perks and power," January 31, 2010
  224. Daily Breeze, "Reclaiming redistricting," February 22, 2010
  225. Rose Report, "Misleading California’s Voters: The Financial Accountability In Redistricting Act," March 24, 2010
  226. 226.0 226.1 Fox and Hounds Daily, "Politicians’ Ongoing Quest to Avoid Accountability," April 23, 2010
  227. ElectionTrack.com, "No On 27 - Keep Voters First, A Coalition Of Good Government Groups"
  228. California Secretary of State, "Campaign Finance: NO ON 27 - KEEP VOTERS FIRST, A COALITION OF GOOD GOVERNMENT GROUPS",
  229. California Watch, "http://californiawatch.org/watchblog/wealthy-donors-passion-project-redistricting-will-voters-care-5747"
  230. 230.0 230.1 ElectionTrack.com, "Contributions to Yes On 20, No On 27"
  231. 231.0 231.1 California Secretary of State, "YES ON 20, NO ON 27 - HOLD POLITICIANS ACCOUNTABLE: Late and $5000+ Contributions Received"
  232. CampaignMoney.com, "Charles Munger Profile"
  233. CampaignMoney.com, "Diane Wisely Profile"
  234. San Francisco Bay Guardian, "Endorsements 2010: State ballot measures", October 5, 2010
  235. San Bernardino Sun, "Editorial: Worth repeating: No on Proposition 27," October 25, 2010
  236. Contra Costa Times, "Contra Costa Times editorial: We recommend yes on Proposition 20, no on 27," September 6, 2010
  237. Lompoc Record, "Props. 20, 27: The flip sides of real change," October 1, 2010
  238. Los Angeles Daily News, "Vote yes on Proposition 20, no on Proposition 27 for a much improved political system," September 14, 2010
  239. Los Angeles Times, "Drawing the lines: Democrats prosper by drawing themselves solidly Democratic seats, and Republicans benefit equally by lines drawn to protect their elected officials. It's time to undo this system, so yes on Proposition 20 and no on Proposition 27.," September 24, 2010
  240. Long Beach Press-Telegram, "Yes on Proposition 20, no on Proposition 27," September 13, 2010
  241. Orange County Register, "Extend redistricting reform to Congress," September 16, 2010
  242. Riverside Press Enterprise, "Yes on 20; no on 27," September 7, 2010
  243. San Diego Union Tribune, "Redistricting reforms must advance," September 7, 2010
  244. San Bernardino Sun, "Vote to improve our government," September 28, 2010
  245. Sacramento Bee, "Leave redistricting reform alone - No on Propositions 20 and 27," September 17, 2010
  246. North County Times, "Yes on Proposition 20, No on 27," August 31, 2010
  247. Santa Rose Press Democrat, "Yes on Proposition 20, no on 27"
  248. Santa Cruz Sentinel, "As We See It: Yes on 20, No on 27," October 3, 2010
  249. San Gabriel Valley Tribune, "No on Proposition 27: Don't let pols usurp people," October 9, 2010
  250. Ventura County Star, "Proposition 20: Yes Proposition 27: No way," September 2, 2010
  251. The Washington Post, "Time for redistricting reform", October 31, 2010.
  252. List of "Yes on Proposition 27" campaign expenditures