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California Proposition 1A, Gambling on Tribal Lands (2000)

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This page is about a 2000 California proposition labeled "Proposition 1A." Consult the Proposition 1A disambiguation page if you are looking for a different Proposition 1A.

California Proposition 1A, also known as the Gambling on Tribal Lands Amendment, was on the March 7, 2000 ballot in California, where it was approved.

It authorized the governor to negotiate compacts with federally recognized Indian tribes on Indian lands in California to operate slot machines, lotteries and banking and percentage card games, subject to legislative ratification.

Proposition 1A was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, placed on the ballot by the California State Legislature as a proposed modification of the Section 19 of Article IV of the California Constitution.

Election results

Proposition 1A
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 4,758,638 64.5%
No2,628,45135.5%

Constitutional changes

California Constitution
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXAXBXIXIIXIIIXIII AXIII BXIII CXIII DXIVXVXVIXVIIIXIXXIX AXIX BXIX CXXXXIXXIIXXXIVXXXV

Proposition 1A amended Section 19 of Article IV by adding a new paragraph (f). The text of Section 19 follows, as it was amended by Proposition 17, with the part added by Proposition 17 printed in italic type.

Section 19:

(a) The Legislature has no power to authorize lotteries and shall prohibit the sale of lottery tickets in the State.

(b) The Legislature may provide for the regulation of horse races and horse race meetings and wagering on the results.

(c) Notwithstanding subdivision (a) , the Legislature by statute may authorize cities and counties to provide for bingo games, but only for charitable purposes.

(d) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), there is authorized the establishment of a California State Lottery.

(e) The Legislature has no power to authorize, and shall prohibit , casinos of the type currently operating in Nevada and New Jersey.

(f) Notwithstanding subdivisions (a) and (e), and any other provision of state law, the Governor is authorized to negotiate and conclude compacts, subject to ratification by the Legislature, for the operation of slot machines and for the conduct of lottery games and banking and percentage card games by federally recognized Indian tribes on Indian lands in California in accordance with federal law. Accordingly, slot machines, lottery games, and banking and percentage card games are hereby permitted to be conducted and operated on tribal lands subject to those compacts.

Coincidentally, on the same March 7, 2000 ballot where voters approved Proposition 1A, they also approved Proposition 17. Proposition 17 also proposed that a new paragraph (f) be added to Section 19 of Article IV. Since both propositions were approved, the official text of the California Constitution shows Section 19 as having two paragraphs (f). The first paragraph (f) comes from Proposition 1A, while the second paragraph (f) comes from Proposition 17.

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title was:

Gambling on Tribal Lands. Legislative Constitutional Amendment.

Summary

The summary of the ballot measure prepared by the California Attorney General read:

  • Modifies state Constitution's prohibition against casinos and lotteries, to authorize Governor to negotiate compacts, subject to legislative ratification, for the operation of slot machines, lottery games, and banking and percentage card games by federally recognized Indian tribes on Indian lands in California, in accordance with federal law.
  • Authorizes slot machines, lottery games, and banking and percentage card games to be conducted and operated on tribal lands subject to the compacts.

Fiscal impact

See also: Fiscal impact statement

The California Legislative Analyst's Office provided an estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact for Proposition 1A. That estimate was:

  • Uncertain fiscal effect on state and local tax revenues ranging from minor impact to significant annual increases.
  • State license fees of tens of millions of dollars each year available for gambling-related costs and other programs.

Campaign spending

Financial supporters of Proposition 1A massively outspent opponents. $23,923,458 was spent in favor, and $3,783 against.

Financial supporters included:

Path to the ballot

Proposition 1A was voted onto the ballot by the California State Legislature via Assembly Bill 1391 of the 1999-2000 Regular Session (Chapter 727, Statutes of 1999).

Votes in legislature to refer to ballot
Chamber Ayes Noes
Assembly 75 4
Senate 35 0

See also

External links