California Proposition 66, Elected County Assessors (June 1988)

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This article is about a 1988 ballot proposition in California. For other measures with a similar title, see Proposition 66.
California Proposition 66, or the Elected County Assessor Act, was on the June 7, 1988 statewide primary ballot in California as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment where it was approved.

Proposition 66 amended the California Constitution to say that the office of county assessor is to be an elective office in charter and noncharter counties.

Election results

Proposition 66
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 3,833,206 73.53%
No1,379,78226.47%

Constitutional changes

California Constitution
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Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVI
VIIVIIIIXXXA
XBXIXIIXIIIXIII A
XIII BXIII CXIII DXIVXVXVIXVIIIXIXXIX AXIX BXIX C
XXXXIXXII
XXXIVXXXV

Proposition 66 amended Section 1 and Section 4 of Article XI of the California Constitution.

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title was:

Elected County Assessor. Legislative Constitutional Amendment.

Summary

The official summary said:

"Presently, the State Constitution requires the offices of district attorney and sheriff to be elective in both charter and noncharter counties. This measure amends the Constitution to provide the office of assessor shall also be an elective office in charter and noncharter counties."

Fiscal impact

See also: Fiscal impact statement

The fiscal estimate provided by the California Legislative Analyst's Office said, "This measure would have no direct state or local fiscal effect."

Path to the ballot

The California State Legislature voted to put Proposition 66 on the ballot in Senate Constitutional Amendment 35 (Statutes of 1988, Resolution Chapter 1).

Votes in legislature to refer to ballot
Chamber Ayes Noes
Assembly 65 0
Senate 38 0
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Suggest a link

External links


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