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California Repeal Cannabis Prohibition Act (2012)

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A Repeal Cannabis Prohibition Act (11-0046) did not qualify for the November 6, 2012 ballot in California as an initiated state statute. To earn a spot on the state's 2012 ballot, sponsors of the initiative would have had to collect 504,760 signatures by April 19, 2012.

However, sponsors of the initiative did not file signatures by their signature-filing deadline.

If this initiative had earned a spot on the ballot and had been approved by the state's voters, it would have:

  • Decriminalized marijuana use, possession, cultivation, transportation, distribution, or sale for adults aged 19 and older.
  • Created a "California Cannabis Commission" to regulate commercial cultivation, processing, testing, transport, distribution, sale, facilities for on-premises consumption, and smoking in public.
  • Authorized local governments to permit marijuana-related conduct otherwise prohibited by state law and regulations.
  • Exempted from regulation or taxation up to three pounds of marijuana for personal use.
  • Retained laws prohibiting marijuana-related conduct that contributes to the delinquency of a minor and driving while impaired by marijuana.

Similar initiatives

The "Repeal Cannabis Prohibition" initiative was not the only marijuana-related initiative vying for a spot on California's November 6, 2012 statewide ballot. The others are:

According to the Los Angeles Times, the Repeal Cannabis Prohibition Act was "the one apparently with the most vocal support within the movement."[1]

Because multiple marijuana-related initiatives are in circulation in California, they are all experiencing difficulty raising the funds necessary to qualify for the ballot. Steve Collett, who supports the Regulate Marijuana Like Wine Initiative, says, "We're all chasing the same dollars."[2]

A group of people closely associated with the Proposition 19 effort, including Richard Lee, had also indicated that they might attempt to qualify a marijuana legalization initiative for the 2012 ballot.[3] However, in September 2011, Lee told a group at the International Cannabis and Hemp Expo in Oakland that this effort was falling apart: "It’s pretty much dead. The funders didn’t come through."[4]

Text of measure

See also: Ballot titles, summaries and fiscal statements for California's 2012 ballot propositions

Ballot title:

Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.

Official summary:

"Decriminalizes marijuana use, possession, cultivation, transportation, distribution, or sale for adults aged 19 and older. Creates California Cannabis Commission to regulate commercial cultivation, processing, testing, transport, distribution, sale, facilities for on-premises consumption, and smoking in public, but authorizes local governments to permit conduct otherwise prohibited by state law and regulations. Exempts from regulation or taxation up to three pounds of marijuana for personal use. Retains laws prohibiting marijuana-related conduct that contributes to the delinquency of a minor and driving while impaired by marijuana."

Summary of estimated fiscal impact:

(This is a summary of the initiative's estimated "fiscal impact on state and local government" prepared by the California Legislative Analyst's Office and the Director of Finance.)

"The fiscal effects of this measure are subject to considerable uncertainty depending on the extent to which the federal government continues to enforce federal marijuana laws and depending upon how, and to what extent, the state chooses to regulate the commercial production and sale of marijuana. Savings potentially in the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually to state and local governments on the costs of enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Costs potentially up to the low tens of millions of dollars annually to the state to regulate the commercial production and sale of marijuana. Potentially hundreds of millions of dollars in net additional tax revenues related to the production and sale of marijuana products."

Path to the ballot

See also: California signature requirements

External links

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References


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