California Teachers Association

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The California Teachers Association (CTA) is a National Education Association-affiliated union in California.[1] CTA was established in 1863 as the California Educational Society. Based in Burlingame, its current president is Dean E. Vogel.[2]

About 1,100 chapters or local teachers associations are chartered as CTA affiliates. The California Faculty Association and the California Community College Association are also affiliated with CTA. The union has approximately 325,000 members. In 2009, it had income of more than $186 million, primarily from membership dues.[3]

The CTA is a major player in California politics, including ballot measure and state legislative campaigns.

The California Fair Political Practices Commission, a government agency, issued a report in March 2010 saying that the CTA had spent $211.8 million on political campaigns in California in the ten-year period beginning on January 1, 2000 and ending on December 31, 2009.[4] The FPPC's report says that the CTA has spent more on campaigns in California in that ten-year period than any other union, business, organization or individual.[5] The size of CTA's warchest in the 10-year period was nearly double that of the California State Council of Service Employees, the group that came in 2nd in what the FPPC referred to as the state's "Big Money" sweepstakes.[4]

State legislative spending

Maplight study

In March 2010, Maplight.Org released a study that showed that the California Teachers Association gave an average of $17,800 to each California State Senator who voted against a January 2010 school reform bill that would have helped California qualify for federal "Race to the Top" funds. The CTA was opposed to the school reform bill. The amount given by the CTA to the senators who voted on their side of the issue was an average of 3.3 times as much as the CTA gave in the 2006 and 2008 state legislative elections to those senators who went on to vote in favor of the bill.[6]

Maplight.Org is a non-profit 501(c)(3) located in Berkeley, California.[7]

"Education Coalition"

According to Dan Walters, ."..in the uncertain days following passage of Proposition 13 in 1978," the "California Teachers Association and other school interests created an Education Coalition that wages constant war in political and legal arenas to protect its share of the state budget." Walters credits Proposition 98 as a significant victory for the "Education Coalition."[8]

Heading into the 2010 election season, Walters says that "unions want to strangle two pending measures" headed for the ballot. The two measures he believes they most want to strangle are a paycheck protection act and a proposed public pension reform act.[9]

Walters says that "the groups sponsoring the two are immune to direct retaliation. So unions and their allies may be attempting to choke off their money by filing measures that would repeal $2 billion in state tax breaks for business enacted last February, virtually prohibit corporate political contributions and sharply raise property taxes on business."[9]

According to his analysis, the goal of unions is to send a signal to major business groups in the state that if they "back the campaigns on union political funds or pensions," they will "face measures that would cost them many billions of dollars in new taxes and reduce their political clout."[9]

Ballot measure activism

2012

See also: California 2012 ballot propositions

Heading into the November 6, 2012 ballot measure election in California, the union has indicated that it will:

  • Support Jerry Brown's Tax Increase Initiative. Dean Vogel, who is the president of the union, contrasted the Brown tax increase proposal to other tax increase proposals that may qualify for the 2012 ballot, saying, "The governor’s initiative is the only initiative that provides additional revenues for our classrooms and closes the state budget deficit, and guarantees local communities will receive funds to pay for the realignment of local health and public safety services that the Legislature approved last year."[10]

In 2005, CTA imposed a $60 annual surcharge on its members to raise $50 million to defeat the spending restraint measures supported by Arnold Schwarzenegger. The surcharge was assessed for 3 years. In 2012, union president Vogel indicated that it is unlikely that the union will impose a similar surcharge: "The last time in this position, we did a special assessment to get more money, but we're not in a position to get more money right now."[2]

2010

See also: Donations to California's 2010 ballot propositions

According to MapLight, the California Teachers Association was the largest donor to the ballot proposition campaigns for the November 2, 2010 ballot.[11]

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 22 Gov't finance Opposed $604,240
Proposition 23 Environment Opposed $200,000
Proposition 24 Taxes Supported $8,885,786
Proposition 25 Gov't finance Supported $1,261,831.00
Proposition 26 Taxes Opposed $504,240

2009

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 1A Taxes Supported $2,100,000[12]

2008

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 4 Parental notification, abortion Opposed $615,512[13]
Proposition 8 Same-sex marriage Opposed $1,300,000[14]
Proposition 9 Law enforcement Opposed $955,911[15]
Proposition 92 Funding allocation Opposed $2,291,101.00[16]
Proposition 93 Lengthen term limits Supported $2,000,000[17]

2006

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 90 Eminent domain reform Opposed $250,000[18]
Proposition 91D Education funding formula Supported $7,442,449[19]
Proposition 85 Abortion Opposed $275,000[20]
Proposition 89 Public funding of campaigns Opposed $205,000[21]
Proposition 82 Universal kindergarten Supported $1,549,263[22]

2005

In 2005, the CTA imposed a $60 annual surcharge on its members to raise $50 million to defeat the measures supported by Arnold Schwarzenegger. The surcharge was assessed for 3 years.[2]

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 74 Increase probationary period for teachers Opposed $8,054,000[23]
Proposition 75 Paycheck protection Opposed $12,100,000[24]
Proposition 76 Spending caps Opposed $13,600,000[25]
Proposition 77 Re-districting Opposed $500,000[26]
Proposition 79 State drug discount program Supported $20,300,000[27]
Proposition 80 Regulation of utilities Supported $3,701,530[28]

2004

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 55 $12.3 billion education bonds Supported $5,000,000[29]
Proposition 56 State budget Supported $2,200,000
Proposition 63 Mental health care Supported $125,979[30]
Proposition 72 Healthcare coverage Supported $1,058,405[31]

2002

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 45 Lengthen term limits Supported $200,000
Proposition 42 - Opposed $1,500,000

2000

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 38 School Choice Opposed $26,366,491[32]
Proposition 26 Tax reform Supported $7,761,723

1998

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 1A School spending Supported $1,043,454[33]
Proposition 8 Education Opposed $6,789,900[34]
Proposition 227 English in public schools Opposed $2,171,719[35]

1993

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 174 School vouchers Opposed $12,500,000[3]

According to a May 2012 article in City Journal, "They ran ads, recalls Ken Khachigian, the former White House speechwriter who headed the Yes on 174 campaign, 'claiming that a witches’ coven would be eligible for the voucher funds and [could] set up a school of its own.' They threatened to field challengers against political candidates who supported school choice. They bullied members of the business community who contributed money to the pro-voucher effort. When In-N-Out Burger donated $25,000 to support Prop. 174, for instance, the CTA threatened to press schools to drop contracts with the company."[3]

1988

Ballot measure Description CTA position on measure CTA donation
Proposition 98 Mandatory education spending Supported

Strike activity

Between 1975 and 2012, the union has sponsored 170 strikes.[3]

External links

References

  1. About the CTA
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Sacramento Bee, "Teachers' union spread thin for November ballot?," January 31, 2012
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 City Journal, "The Worst Union in America," May 2012
  4. 4.0 4.1 Fair Political Practices Commission, "Big Money Talks: California's Billion Dollar Club," March 2010
  5. San Francisco Chronicle, "15 groups spent $1 billion to sway policy," March 11, 2010
  6. Maplight.Org, "CTA money correlated to voting patterns on Race to the Top bill in CA legislature," March 10, 2010
  7. About Maplight.Org
  8. Fresno Bee, "Dan Walters: Judges quarrel as California fiscal crisis worsens," November 16, 2009
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 San Luis Obispo Tribune, "Political chess played on California initiatives," December 4, 2009
  10. EdSource, "California Teachers Association endorses Brown tax initiative," January 29, 2012
  11. MapLight, "$147 Million Spent on California's Nov. Ballot Measures," November 5, 2010
  12. Campaign donations to Prop 1A
  13. Follow the Money on Prop 4
  14. California Same-Sex Marriage Initiative Campaigns Shatter Spending Records
  15. Record of donations to the campaign opposing Proposition 9
  16. Donations over $5,000 to No on Prop 92 recorded by the California Secretary of State
  17. Donors over $5,000 to Yes on Prop 93 as recorded by the California Secretary of State
  18. Follow the Money on Proposition 90
  19. Follow the Money on Proposition 90
  20. Follow the Money on Proposition 85
  21. Follow the Money on Proposition 89
  22. Follow the Money on Proposition 82
  23. Contribution detail of donors to Prop 74
  24. Contribution detail of large donors to Prop 75
  25. Contribution detail of large donors to Prop 76
  26. Contribution detail of large donors to Prop 77
  27. Contribution detail of large donors to Props 79 & 80
  28. Contribution detail of large donors to Prop 80
  29. [http://www.followthemoney.org/database/StateGlance/committee.phtml?c=1218 Yes on 55 spending
  30. Follow the Money on Proposition 63
  31. Follow the Money on Proposition 72
  32. California Secretary of State's report on California Teacher Association ballot contributions from 1999-2000
  33. Top Ten Contributors to the Proposition 1A campaign
  34. Top Ten Contributors to the Proposition 8 campaign
  35. Campaign Finance Information for Prop 227