Changes in 2014 to laws governing ballot measures

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Changes in 2015
Changes in 2013

As of December 15, 2014, at least 113 laws concerning ballot measures in 29 states were put before legislatures in 2014. Of the total, 66 were carried over from 2013. Of the total, 97 failed, and 13 were approved. Three were carried over from 2014 to 2015. On September 27, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown (D) announced that he had vetoed Assembly Bill 400 in California.[1]

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This page lists changes and proposed changes in 2014 to laws governing the initiative and referendum process. Given the complexity of the initiative process, these laws can address a wide range of initiative-related law, including:
  • The legal right of citizens to initiate statutes, amendments, or veto referendums.
  • Signature and distribution requirements for placing measures on the ballot.
  • Regulations governing signature collection and petition circulators.
  • Campaign finance requirements for initiative, referendum, and recall campaigns.
  • Administrative rules, involving filing deadlines, fiscal analyses, petition forms, etc.

Note: This database is only periodically updated. For the status of a single bill, click the title to view its state bill status page.

Legend
Simple icon time.svg = This legislation is still pending.
Right-facing-Arrow-icon.jpg = This legislation was carried over to the next session.
Approveda = This legislation was approved.
Defeatedd = This legislation was defeated or is dead.








Laws approved in 2014

  1. Approveda Arizona House Bill 2196: Repeals 2013 Arizona House Bill 2305, which contained multiple election and ballot law reform provisions; introduced in 2014.[2]
  2. Approveda Arizona House Bill 2107: Allows certain petition signatures dated by the signer after the signature petition sheet was dated by the circulator and reaffirms the necessity for circulators to signify if they are paid or volunteer on the petition form.[3]
  3. Approveda Maryland Senate Bill 930: Changes the dates of required campaign finance reports for ballot issue campaign entities.
  4. Approveda South Dakota House Bill 1096: Allows and makes changes to the procedure for challenges to sufficiency of signature petitions.
  5. Approveda Utah House Bill 192: Adds a statement to a statewide or local initiative petition signature sheet stating that a signer has read, understands, and agrees to the law proposed by the petition; adds a statement to a statewide or local referendum petition signature sheet stating that a signer has read and understands the law the petition seeks to overturn; and makes technical corrections.[4]
  6. Approveda Utah House Bill 379: Allows and provides for arguments in favor of and against ballot measures and requires a public meeting at which written and oral arguments can be presented.
  7. Approveda Utah House Bill 422: Requires reports and studies on the fiscal and legal impact of local initiatives and referenda.
  8. Approveda California Assembly Bill 2093: Officially clarifies and specifies that a petition signature deadline that falls on the weekend or a holiday is extended to the next business day. It was introduced in 2014.[5]
  9. Approveda California Senate Bill 1253: Requires more comprehensive information available for voters about initiatives, including clear summary on Secretary of State website, list of top ten donors on Secretary of State website, public hearings on each initiative at least 131 days before the election. It would also allow initiative proponents to withdraw the initiative at any time prior to certification. It was introduced in 2014.[6][7]
  10. Approveda California Assembly Bill 2219: Makes changes to the notices to the California Secretary of State required during the signature verification process and alters the other portions of the signature verification process and requirements.[8][9]
  11. Approveda California Assembly Bill 882: Amends existing provisions regarding recall petition. Provides that if 500 or more signatures are submitted to the elections official, the election official may verify, using a random sampling technique, either 3% of the signatures submitted or 500 signatures, whichever is greater. This bill was carried over from 2013.[10]
  12. Approveda California Senate Bill 477: Declares the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would prohibit a political campaign committee from accepting large contributions made for the purpose of supporting a statewide initiative ballot measure until the committee has first received a significant number of small individual contributions made for the same purpose. This bill was carried over from 2013.[10]
  13. Approveda California Assembly Bill 510: Requires that a committee file a report if they pay any amount to an individual for his or her appearance in an advertisement to support or oppose the qualification, passage, or defeat of a ballot measure if the advertisement states or otherwise communicates that the individual is a practitioner or member of a profession having expertise or specialized knowledge relating to the subject of the measure. This bill was carried over from 2013.

Legislation by state

Alaska

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Alaska

The following bills were introduced in the Alaska State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SB 149: Adds requirements for additional public hearings on initiatives and referendums scheduled for the ballot. Died in Senate committee.
  2. Defeatedd HB 274: Adds requirements for additional public hearings on initiatives and referendums scheduled for the ballot. Died in Senate committee.

Arizona

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Arizona

The following bills were introduced in the Arizona State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SCR 1003: Requires voter re-approval every eight years for any measure that spends or collects public dollars; introduced in 2014.[11][12]
  2. Defeatedd HCR 2018: Requires voter re-approval every eight years for any measure that spends or collects public dollars; introduced in 2014. This resolution died in a Senate committee.[13]
  3. Approveda HB 2196: Repeals 2013 Arizona House Bill 2305, which contained multiple election and ballot law reform provisions; introduced in 2014.[14]
  4. Approveda HB 2107: Allows certain petition signatures dated by the signer after the signature petition sheet was dated by the circulator and reaffirms the necessity for circulators to signify if they are paid or volunteer on the petition form.[15]
  5. Defeatedd SB 1436: Removes the necessity to sign the statement of verification, previously called the affidavit, before a public notary. Died in a Senate committee.[16]
  6. Defeatedd HB 2014: Requires notice of Proposition 105 restrictions on publicity pamphlets, official ballots and campaign literature for ballot measures. Proposition 105 prevents legislators from repealing or changing any law approved by the voters except through a 3/4ths majority or through referral to the ballot.[17]
  7. Defeatedd SB 1232: Changes registration and other requirements for circulators who are non-residents. Requires certain paid petition circulators to register with the Secretary of State (SOS) prior to circulating petitions. Allows any person to file a registration-based challenge against circulators in the superior court of the county in which the circulator is registered.[18]

California

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in California

The following bills were introduced in the California State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SB 1294: Requires the California Legislative Analyst, instead of the California Attorney General, to prepare the ballot label and the ballot title and summary for all measures submitted to the voters of the state. Claims to further the purpose of the Political Reform Act of 1974. It died in chamber.[19]
  2. Defeatedd ACA 12: Requires petitioners to submit an initiative or referendum petition to the California Secretary of State and requires the secretary of state prepare title and summary, rather than the attorney general. It died in chamber.
  3. Approveda AB 2093: Officially clarifies and specifies that a petition signature deadline that falls on the weekend or a holiday is extended to the next business day. It was introduced in 2014.[20]
  4. Approveda SB 1253: Requires more comprehensive information available for voters about initiatives, including clear summary on Secretary of State website, list of top ten donors on Secretary of State website, public hearings on each initiative at least 131 days before the election. It would also allow initiative proponents to withdraw the initiative at any time prior to certification. It was introduced in 2014.[21][7]
  5. Defeatedd AB 1117: Requires the Secretary of State to provide on the agency's Web site an electronic mail address at which the proponent of a proposed initiative or referendum measure may submit a copy of the petition for the measure in portable document format. Provides that, after receiving the petition, the petition is to be made available to the public through a hyperlink on the Web site that can be downloaded and printed. Requires a specified disclaimer that makes the petition available to the public. This bill was carried over from 2013. It died in chamber.[10]
  6. Approveda AB 882: Amends existing provisions regarding recall petition. Provides that if 500 or more signatures are submitted to the elections official, the election official may verify, using a random sampling technique, either 3% of the signatures submitted or 500 signatures, whichever is greater. This bill was carried over from 2013.[10]
  7. Approveda SB 477: Declares the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation that would prohibit a political campaign committee from accepting large contributions made for the purpose of supporting a statewide initiative ballot measure until the committee has first received a significant number of small individual contributions made for the same purpose. This bill was carried over from 2013.[10]
  8. Defeatedd AB 400[22]: Requires a state or local initiative, referendum, or recall petition circulated by a paid circulator who is paid by a committee to include a disclosure statement identifying the persons from whom the committee received the 5 largest cumulative contributions in support of the measure and the name of their employer, if 2 or more of these contributors have the same employer. Requires this disclosure statement to be updated as specified. This bill was carried over from 2013. It was vetoed by the governor.[9]
  9. Defeatedd ACA 6: Increases the vote requirement of votes cast for the electors to amend the Constitution by an initiative measure to 55%. Permits the electors to repeal a previously adopted initiative or legislative amendment to the Constitution, including certain subsequent amendments to the constitutional amendment, by an initiative measure passed by a majority vote. This bill was carried over from 2013. It died in Chamber.
  10. Approveda AB 510: Requires that a committee file a report if they pay any amount to an individual for his or her appearance in an advertisement to support or oppose the qualification, passage, or defeat of a ballot measure if the advertisement states or otherwise communicates that the individual is a practitioner or member of a profession having expertise or specialized knowledge relating to the subject of the measure. This bill was carried over from 2013.
  11. Defeatedd SCA 6: Proposes an amendment to the Constitution to prohibit an initiative measure that would result in a net increase in state or local government costs, from being submitted to the electors or having any effect unless and until the Legislative Analyst and the Director of Finance jointly determine that the initiative measure provides for additional revenues in an amount that meets or exceeds the net increase in costs. This bill was carried over from 2013. It died in chamber.
  12. Defeatedd SB 121 Requires a corporation that has shareholders located in this state and that makes a contribution or expenditure to, or in support of or in opposition to, a candidate, ballot measure campaign, or a signature-gathering effort on behalf of a ballot measure, political party, or political action committee to issue a report on the political expenditures of the corporation in the previous fiscal year, and to notify shareholders prior to each political contribution.[10][23]
  13. Approveda AB 2219: Makes changes to the notices to the California Secretary of State required during the signature verification process and alters the other portions of the signature verification process and requirements.[24][9]

Colorado

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Colorado

The following bills were introduced in the Colorado State Legislature

  1. Defeatedd HCR 1002: Requires more signatures to qualify an initiated constitutional amendment for the ballot; requires signatures from each legislative district. HCR 1002 would be enacted on approval from the electorate of the state. It was introduced in 2014. Died in Senate State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Committee.[25]

Georgia

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Georgia

The following bills were introduced in the Georgia State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HR 162: Proposes an amendment that provides that the ballot language shall be provided by the Attorney General, summarize the proposed constitutional amendment accurately and objectively. Died in House.
  2. Defeatedd SR 692: Proposes an amendment that provides for public initiatives and referendums; provides for procedures, number of signatures required, verification methods, form of petition and other I & R specifics. Died in Senate.

Hawaii

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Hawaii

The following bills were introduced in the Hawaii State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SB 771: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative, referendum, and recall. It died in a Senate committee.
  2. Defeatedd HB 1816: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative and referendum. It died in a Senate committee.
  3. Defeatedd SB 2360: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative and referendum. It died in a Senate committee.
  4. Defeatedd SB 2361: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative and referendum. It died in a Senate committee.
  5. Defeatedd SB 2141: Amends the State constitution to provide for recall.
  6. Defeatedd SB 2359: Amends the State constitution to provide for recall.
  7. Defeatedd SB 2142: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative. It died in a Senate committee.
  8. Defeatedd SB 2632: Amends the State constitution to provide for initiative. It died in a Senate committee.
  9. Defeatedd SB 2143: Amends the State constitution to provide for referendum. It died in a Senate committee.

Idaho

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Idaho

The following bills were introduced in the Idaho State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 444: Standardizes initiative and referendum procedures for local and state initiatives and referendums. It died in State Affairs Committee.

Illinois

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Illinois

The following bills were introduced in the Illinois State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HJRCA 12: Provides for the recall of all state executive branch officers and members of the general assembly. Changes the signature requirements for affidavits and petitions for recall of the governor.

Kansas

The following bills were introduced in the Kansas State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 2518: Allows city and county election offices to request a ballot language statement, summary and explanation from the relevant legal counsel, such as the district attorney or county counsel. It died in a Senate committee.

Maryland

The following bills were introduced in the Maryland State Legislature:

  1. Approveda SB 930: Changes the dates of required campaign finance reports for ballot issue campaign entities.

Massachusetts

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Massachusetts

The following bills were introduced in the Massachusetts State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 556: Relates to state recall elections.
  2. Defeatedd HB 602: Relates to limiting contributions to ballot question committees.
  3. Defeatedd HB 627: Requires the state secretary to promulgate regulations governing the conduct of paid signature gatherers for ballot questions, designed to achieve and maintain security from forgery and fraud in the collection of signatures on petitions for ballot questions and names thereon.
  4. Defeatedd HB 67: Adds the following to the state constitution: "No initiative petition shall propose a constitutional amendment that would restrict the rights set forth in this constitution to freedom and equality, or the right of each individual to be protected by society in the enjoyment of life, liberty and property, according to standing laws."
  5. Defeatedd SB 13: Adds the following to the state constitution: "No initiative petition shall propose a constitutional amendment that would restrict the rights set forth in this constitution to freedom and equality, or the right of each individual to be protected by society in the enjoyment of life, liberty and property, according to standing laws."
  6. Defeatedd SB 1438: Provides that Part B taxable income shall not be taxed at a rate of more than 5.3 per cent unless said rate is approved by the initiative petition process.
  7. Defeatedd SB 332: Determines that the state secretary shall further promulgate regulations governing the conduct of paid signature gatherers for ballot questions, designed to achieve and maintain security from forgery and fraud in the collection of signatures on petitions for ballot questions and names therein.

Michigan

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Michigan

The following bills were introduced in the Michigan State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 4046: Prohibits circulators being paid for each petition signature collected, and requires petition circulators to wear identification badges.
  2. Defeatedd HB 4883: Requires that proposals be placed on the ballot before candidate names, with local proposals first, then county, then statewide.
  3. Defeatedd HJR E: Protects legislation making appropriations by reducing spending, from referendum.
  4. Defeatedd HJR Q: Provides for a constitutional amendment clarifying appropriation bills subject to referendum.
  5. Defeatedd SB 10: Requires the name of individual or organization providing compensation to a circulator of a ballot question petition to be printed on the front of the petition.
  6. Defeatedd SJR C: Provides for a constitutional amendment that clarifies appropriations bills subject to referendum.
  7. Defeatedd SJR X: Provides for a constitutional amendment that requires two-thirds majority vote of the legislature for passage of a law that is the same or similar to a law rejected by a referendum.

Minnesota

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Minnesota

The following bills were introduced in the Minnesota State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 1762: Prohibits the use of public fund to promote or defeat ballot questions.
  2. Defeatedd HB 196: Constitutional amendment that would require a two-thirds vote of each house of the legislature to submit a constitutional amendment to the people.
  3. Defeatedd HB 93: Constitutional amendment that would require a two-thirds vote of each house of the legislature to submit a constitutional amendment to the people.
  4. Defeatedd SB 1597: Prohibits the use of public fund to promote or defeat ballot questions.

Missouri

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Missouri

The following bills were introduced in the Missouri State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HJR 88: Authorizes a constitutional amendment ballot measure seeking to prohibit the legislature from amending or repealing an initiative approved by voters except by referral to voters in a referendum.
  2. Defeatedd SB 631: Requires a preliminary five thousand sponsoring signatures of registered voters of Missouri in support of an initiative before the initiative petition can be cleared for circulation.
  3. Defeatedd SB 486: Makes changes to laws governing campaign finance for ballot measure supporters and opponents.
  4. Defeatedd SB 487: Makes changes to laws governing campaign finance for ballot measure supporters and opponents.
  5. Defeatedd SB 738: Makes changes to laws governing campaign finance for ballot measure supporters and opponents.

Nebraska

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Nebraska

The following bills were introduced in the Nebraska State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd LB 160: Provide for electronic signatures on recall, initiative, and referendum petitions.

New Jersey

The following bills were introduced in the New Jersey State Legislature:

  1. Right-facing-Arrow-icon.jpg SCR 54: Proposes constitutional amendment to provide for the power of referendum and initiative with regard to directing fiscal restraint.
  2. Right-facing-Arrow-icon.jpg ACR 36: Proposes constitutional amendment to provide for the power of referendum and initiative with regard to directing fiscal restraint.
  3. Right-facing-Arrow-icon.jpg ACR 67: Proposes constitutional amendment to provide for statewide initiative and referendum powers.

New Mexico

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in New Mexico

The following bills were introduced in the New Mexico State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd NM SJR 17: Requires a two-thirds majority approval of any proposed constitutional amendment in both the Senate and House before the amendment is presented to the voters for ratification; introduced in 2014.[26]

New York

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in New York

The following bills were introduced in the New York State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd A 1557: Establishes an initiative and referendum process so that voters are able to bring issues to the state legislature for consideration; defines terms.
  2. Defeatedd A 3118: Establishes a procedure for a people's veto of laws enacted by the legislature.
  3. Defeatedd A 3672: Provides for regulation of delegates to a constitutional convention, their election and public financing for such elections.
  4. Defeatedd A 3972: Provides for regulation of delegates to a constitutional convention, their election, and public financing for such elections.
  5. Defeatedd 5392: Provides for initiative and referendum and recall; empowers the electors with the ability to propose statutes and amendments to the constitution, approve or reject statutes or parts of statutes, and remove elective officers.
  6. Defeatedd A 6161: Provides for the recall power of the electors to remove an elective officer.
  7. Defeatedd AB 1557: Provides for initiative and referendum petitions for electors.
  8. Defeatedd S 1651: Establishes a procedure for a people's veto of laws enacted by the legislature.
  9. Defeatedd S 2214: Provides for initiative and referendum and recall.
  10. Defeatedd S 2763: Proposes an amendment to the constitution providing the electors with the power of initiative, indirect initiative and referendum.
  11. Defeatedd S 3253: Provides for regulation of delegates to a constitutional convention, their election, and public financing for such.
  12. Defeatedd S 329: Provides for recall; empowers the electors with the ability to remove elective officers.
  13. Defeatedd S 4049: Provides for initiative and referendum in New York State for the People as electors to propose or reject laws and submit amendments to the state constitution.
  14. Defeatedd S 5512: Provides for the recall power of the electors to remove an elective officer.
  15. Defeatedd SB 1651: Establishes a procedure for a people's veto of laws enacted by the legislature.

Ohio

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Ohio

The following bills were introduced in the Ohio State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 118: Revises language regarding bond issues.
  2. Defeatedd HB 157: Establishes a procedure to recall an elective township officer.

Oklahoma

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Oklahoma

The following bills were introduced in the Oklahoma State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 1008: Provides for the recall of elected officers and details petitions to be used for recall efforts.
  2. Defeatedd HB 1635: Provides for the recall of elected officers and details petitions to be used for recall efforts.
  3. Defeatedd HB 1823: Placeholder for the Oklahoma Initiative and Referendum Act.
  4. Defeatedd SB 1315: Changes the circulation period for petitions to be ninety days from the date provided by the secretary of state. The date must be between three and ten days after all litigation, protests and rehearings over the initiative are settled. The bill was vetoed by the governor.

Pennsylvania

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Pennsylvania

The following bills were introduced in the Pennsylvania State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 1376: An Act amending the act of June 27, 2006 (1st Sp.Sess., P.L.1873, No.1), known as the Taxpayer Relief Act, further providing for public referendum requirements for increasing certain taxes.
  2. Defeatedd SB 365: An amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, authorizing the use of the indirect initiative and referendum as powers reserved to the people.

Rhode Island

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Rhode Island

The following bills were introduced in the Rhode Island State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SR 2039: Proposes constitutional amendment ballot measure that would, on approval, provide the power of initiative and referendum to the people of Rhode Island.
  2. Defeatedd SB 2042: Provides details of the initiative and referendum process and how petitions would be submitted.

South Carolina

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in South Carolina

The following bills were introduced in the South Carolina State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SJR 16: Proposes a constitutional amendment establishing a specified procedure for the enactment or repeal of laws and constitutional amendments by initiative petition and referendum and to provide exceptions.

South Dakota

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in South Dakota

The following bills were introduced in the South Dakota State Legislature:

  1. Approveda HB 1096: Allows and makes changes to the procedure for challenges to sufficiency of signature petitions.

Utah

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Utah

The following bills were introduced in the Utah State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HJR 4: Puts a question on the ballot about whether Utah voters should have the power to recall state-wide officials or not; introduced in 2014.[27]
  2. Defeatedd HB 63: Establishes the technicalities and details of the recall petition and election procedures, if the amendment proposed by HJR 4 is approved and the power of recall is granted.
  3. Approveda HB 192: Adds a statement to a statewide or local initiative petition signature sheet stating that a signer has read, understands, and agrees to the law proposed by the petition; adds a statement to a statewide or local referendum petition signature sheet stating that a signer has read and understands the law the petition seeks to overturn; and makes technical corrections.[28]
  4. Approveda HB 379: Allows and provides for arguments in favor of and against ballot measures and requires a public meeting at which written and oral arguments can be presented.
  5. Approveda HB 422: Requires reports and studies on the fiscal and legal impact of local initiatives and referenda.

Vermont

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Vermont

The following bills were introduced in the Vermont State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd H 320: Proposes to establish a citizens’ initiative process and to require the General Assembly to vote on laws proposed by citizens in accordance with this process.

Washington

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Washington

The following bills were introduced in the Washington State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HB 1211: Concerns primary election voters' pamphlets.
  2. Defeatedd HB 1720: Increases transparency of donors to candidates and ballot measures.
  3. Defeatedd HB 1966: Permits electronic submission of application to circulate initiative petition.
  4. Defeatedd HB 2033: Reduces the costs and inefficiencies in elections by eliminating a requirement to include the full text of ballot measures in the printed version of voters' pamphlets.
  5. Defeatedd HB 2066: Reduces the costs and inefficiencies in elections by eliminating a requirement to include the full text of ballot measures in the printed version of voters' pamphlets.
  6. Defeatedd SB 5347: Declares that any state or local initiative for which sufficient valid voter signatures are submitted within the time period required must be submitted to a vote of the people at the next election date.
  7. Defeatedd SB 5499: Changes deadline for filing initiative petitions from ten to twenty months before the election.
  8. Defeatedd SB 5505: Concerning individual voter signatures on a petition, the secretary of state must accept and must not reject a valid voter signature if it matches the signature on the voter's registration as long as the requirements in existing law are met.
  9. Defeatedd SB 5676: Protects personal voter signatures.
  10. Defeatedd HB 2552: Requires paid signatures to register with the state; prohibits a paid circulator from collecting signatures for another measure as a volunteer; requires re-registration of paid circulators at certain times and boost the information required on registration forms for paid circulators.
  11. Defeatedd HB 1595: Establishes certain requirements for local initiative and referendum processes not controlled by a home-rule charter. Authorizes county governments not governed by a home-rule charter to establish procedures for the initiative and referendum power not controlled by state law.

West Virginia

The following bills were introduced in the West Virginia State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd HJR 27: Proposes constitutional amendment establishing the power of initiative, referendum and recall in the state of West Virginia.
  2. Defeatedd SJR 1: Proposes constitutional amendment establishing the power of initiative, referendum and recall in the state of West Virginia.

Wisconsin

See also: Laws governing ballot measures in Wisconsin

The following bills were introduced in the Wisconsin State Legislature:

  1. Defeatedd SB 114: Relates to recall petition requirements.

See also

References

  1. Note: Some bills that were not reintroduced in 2014 were counted as "failed" bills for this year since they could have been reintroduced.
  2. Payson Roundup, "Election Reform Brouhaha: Lawmakers repeal law to thwart initiative," February 18, 2014 (dead link)
  3. LegiScan, "Arizona HB 2107," accessed June 25, 2014
  4. UtahPolicy.com, "Proposed Legislation Would Make it Harder to Get Citizen Initiatives on the Ballot," February 24, 2014
  5. LegiScan, "California Assembly Bill 2093," accessed May 28, 2014
  6. San Diego Jewish World, "Measure to make initiatives more transparent advances," April 23, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 Lake County News, "STATE: Governor signs ballot reform measure," September 29, 2014
  8. LegiScan, "California Assembly Bill 2219," accessed June 25, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 California Government website, "List of signed and vetoed bills from governor," accessed September 29, 2014
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 National Conference of State Legislatures website database, accessed March 4, 2014
  11. Ahwatukee Foothills News, "Law would force voters to reapprove measures again and again," February 19, 2014
  12. Payson Roundup, "Law Would Force Re-Votes On Ballot Measures," March 10, 2014
  13. LegiScan, "Arizona House Concurrent Resolution 2018," accessed June 25, 2014
  14. Payson Roundup, "Election Reform Brouhaha: Lawmakers repeal law to thwart initiative," February 18, 2014 (dead link)
  15. LegiScan, "Arizona HB 2107," accessed June 25, 2014
  16. Open States, "Senate Bill 1436," accessed June 25, 2014
  17. LegiScan, "Arizona HB 2014," June 25, 2014
  18. Arizona Legislature website, "Arizona Senate Bill 1232 information," accessed June 25, 2014
  19. California Legislature website, "California Senate Bill 1294," accessed June 25, 2014
  20. LegiScan, "California Assembly Bill 2093," accessed May 28, 2014
  21. San Diego Jewish World, "Measure to make initiatives more transparent advances," April 23, 2014
  22. Note: The X mark before this bill title is there to indicate the bill was vetoed by Governor Brown. It will be counted as "pending" until the legislature decides whether to override the veto or not.
  23. California Legislature website, "Senate Bill 121 information," accessed April 13, 2014
  24. LegiScan, "California Assembly Bill 2219," accessed June 25, 2014
  25. The Durango Herald," Should it be tougher to amend Colo. Constitution?" April 28, 2014
  26. Senate Reporter, "IN SESSION: Proposal would require higher standards for constitutional amendments," January 30, 2014
  27. The Standard Examiner, "Weber lawmaker: Amend Utah Constitution to allow top officials' recall elections," January 17, 2014
  28. UtahPolicy.com, "Proposed Legislation Would Make it Harder to Get Citizen Initiatives on the Ballot," February 24, 2014