Chicago Tea Party

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Flyer about the February 27 Tea Party

The Chicago Tea Party is the generic term for a movement that started in Seattle, Washington on February 16, 2009,[1][2] and then gained momentum on Thursday, February 19 when Rick Santelli in an on-air segment on CNBC Business Newslive called for a "Chicago Tea Party." Santelli's remarks became known as the "Rant Heard 'Round the World".[3]

Organizers of the Chicago Tea Party have sprung up in many different quarters of the fiscally conservative movement and include Top Conservatives on Twitter, Smart Girl Politics, Don't Go, Americans for Tax Reform, the Heartland Institute, American Spectator Magazine, the New American Tea Party and many others.[4]

On February 27 and 28, rallies and protests were held in over 40 cities around the country. In the wake of this level of activity, organizers have called for a new round of protests to begin on April 15.

Background

This event was part of a national movement referred to as the Chicago Tea Party. The series of protests began in Seattle, Washington on February 16, 2009, later gaining momentum on Thursday, February 19, when Rick Santelli in an on-air segment on CNBC Business Newslive called for a "Chicago Tea Party." Santelli's remarks became known as the "Rant Heard 'Round the World."[5]

Organizers sprang up in many different quarters of the fiscally conservative movement online and include Top Conservatives on Twitter, Smart Girl Politics, Don't Go, Americans for Tax Reform, the Heartland Institute, American Spectator Magazine, the New American Tea Party and many others.[6]

Chicago gathering February 27

"Chicago Tea Party," in addition to being used as a generic term to describe the overall bailout rallies held around the country, also refers specifically to events held in Chicago. A first such event was held on February 27 at the Daley Plaza Civic Center in downtown Chicago from 11:00am - 12:00pm.

Attendance reports of the February 27 Chicago Tea Party, which was covered on local radio and television stations, varied from 400 to 1,000 participants.

The main organizer of the Chicago rally was Eric Odom of the DontGo Movement, who wrote of the day's events, "It was made clear throughout the day that Americans believe, regardless of party, that our government is no longer representing the wishes of the taxpayers."[7]

Speakers included Dan Proft, Tony Peraica and Sam Adams Alliance staffer Nic Hall, playing a role as Sam Adams.[8][9]

Blog coverage

Image from Chicago tea party.jpg

Blog coverage of the February 27 rally in Chicago included:

Tea Party links

Lists of February 27 events

Facebook groups

Additional reading

References