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Chuck Tooley

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Chuck Tooley
Chuck Tooley.jpg
Candidate for
Montana Public Service Commissioner - District 2
PartyDemocratic
Prior offices
Mayor of Billings, Montana
1996 – 2005
Education
Bachelor'sLynchburg College, Virginia (1968)
Personal
ProfessionPresident of Tooley Communications, Inc.
Websites
Personal website
Campaign website
BallotpediaAvatar bigger (transparent background).png
The information about this individual is current as of when his or her last campaign ended. See anything that needs updating? Send a correction to our editors
Chuck Tooley was the 2012 Democratic nominee for District 2 of the Montana Public Service Commission. He was defeated by Republican primary winner Kirk Bushman in the general election on November 6, 2012.

Biography

Tooley is a 4th Generation Montanan, with family spread across the state. He served in the US Army from 1969-1972, including a tour of duty in Vietnam, working with Strategic Communications Command and had Top Secret Crypto Security Clearance. He then returned to Montana, worked for New York Life Insurance Company from 1974-1977, served as State Field Director for a successful US Senate Campaign from 1977-1978, and worked in sales for the Mountain Bell Telephone Company from 1978-1983.[1]

In 1984, he established his company, Tooley Communications, Inc, which he serves as President on today. He served as Director of the Urban Institute of MSU-Billings from April 2007 to June 30, 2011. He began his political career on the Billings City Council and was later elected mayor for three times before leaving office. Serving from 1996 to 2005, he was the longest-serving mayor in the history of Billings.[1]

He is husband to Joanie, dad to Marni, and says he is "honored to be a Montanan, serving Montanans."[1]

Education

  • Bachelor of Arts, Lynchburg College, Virginia, 1968

Affiliations

Tooley has been affiliated with the following organizations:[1]

  • President, Montana League of Cities and Towns
  • Board member, United States Conference of Mayors
  • Chair, US Mayors Committee on Population/Resource Conservation
  • Delegate, National League of Cities – several conventions
  • Mayors Institute for City Design
  • Jerusalem Conference of Mayors
  • Burton K. Wheeler Center for Public Policy - Board of Directors
  • Salvation Army Billings Corps - Advisory Board
  • Rocky Mountain College - Board of Trustees
  • MSU-Billings Master in Public Administration Program - Advisory Council
  • St. Vincent Healthcare Cancer Committee
  • Montana Shakespeare in the Parks - Advisory Board
  • Urban Land Institute

Political career

Mayor of Billings, Montana (1996-2005)

From January 1996 to December 2005, Tooley was the Mayor of Billings, a city with metro area population of 130,000, budget over $200M and 800 employees. Municipal government functions include fire and police departments, streets, water and sanitary sewer, solid waste disposal, library, airport, parks and recreation. In the position he worked with citizens, community leaders, state legislators, members of Congress, federal agencies, and mayors of other cities. Tooley was elected to three consecutive terms with 68% to 90% of the vote.[1]

Achievements

Tooley listed his accomplishments in office as follows:[1]

  • "Established methods to expedite building processes and improve relationships between contractors and city government. From 1995 to 2004 construction increased from $89M to $213M annually."
  • "Initiated the process to develop and pass a city annexation policy in accordance with growth policy guidelines."
  • "Chaired executive committee of Downtown Billings Partnership, implementing a long-term plan for revitalization. Used public funds to stimulate over $50 million of private investment at a ratio of $1.00 to $6.52 and brought 100 new businesses to downtown in less than eight years."
  • "Published articles on government, taxation, the arts, and community in magazines and newspapers."
  • "Served as spokesperson for city in print and broadcast media."
  • "Presented at Urban Land Institute forums in Orlando: “The Role of the Arts in Downtown Revitalization” and Indianapolis: “Bringing Community Back to the City.”
  • "Wrote and delivered 80 to 100 speeches per year throughout the community and cities around the nation."
  • "Created and implemented a successful campaign to support a mill levy for public safety in 1998. Also promoted successful levies for transportation and recreation issues."
  • "Established blue ribbon committee for development of strategy to support city-wide recreational bond issue."
  • "Formed the team and raised funds to build an outstanding skate park for the youth of Billings.
  • "Created Human Relations Commission and Board of Ethics for the City of Billings."
  • "Set standards for courtesy and effectiveness in the conduct of city council meetings and public hearings."
  • "Authored city revenue policy."
  • "Lobbied and testified at every session of the Montana Legislature since 1997."
  • "Led the IEMC simulated disaster exercise at the Federal Emergency Management Institute in 2001."
  • "Hosted seminar on Weapons of Mass Destruction in 2002 for mayors in surrounding states."
  • "Served as local government spokesperson for full-scale emergency exercise in Yellowstone County."
  • "Chaired the Billings Citizens Corps Council."
  • "Raised the profile of the City of Billings nationally and internationally."

Issues

Campaign themes

2012

In information submitted to Ballotpedia, Tooley outlined why he ran for Public Service Commission:[1]
"I’m Chuck Tooley and I'm running for Montana Public Service Commission District 2 because I want all Montanans to be treated fairly in decisions that impact their economic well-being.

The Montana Public Service Commission (PSC) regulates monopolies that provide electricity, gas, telephone and other services. The PSC needs committed, fair-minded members who will deliberate in good faith.

My career in business and public service has prepared me for the collaborative and analytical work of the PSC. It has taught me that a professional attitude and constructive give-and-take are essential to getting things done. I want to represent the citizens of Southeastern Montana effectively and conscientiously by:

1. Bringing positivity and professionalism to the process.

2. Promoting economic development in Montana by ensuring fair rates for reliable utility service.

3. Making decisions for the benefit of present and future generations of Montanans.

During my 30+ years in business and 15+ years in elective office in Montana, I have aimed for a high level of professionalism. I would be honored to continue in that spirit as your next Public Service Commissioner."

Elections

2012

See also: Montana down ballot state executive elections, 2012

Tooley ran for District 2 of the Montana Public Service Commission in 2012. He defeated Lynda Moss in the Democratic primary on June 5, 2012 and was defeated by Republican primary victor Kirk Bushman in the general election, which took place on November 6, 2012.[2]

Montana Public Service Commission District 2 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Chuck Tooley 47.3% 42,587
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngKirk Bushman 52.7% 47,385
Total Votes 89,972
Election Results via Montana Secretary of State.


Montana Public Service Commissioner District 2 Democratic Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngChuck Tooley 56.4% 9,549
Lynda Moss 43.6% 7,374
Total Votes 16,923
Election Results Via:The Montana Secretary of State.


Campaign donors

2012

Tooley lost the election to the position of Montana Public Service Commissioner District 2 in 2012. During that election cycle, Tooley raised a total of $56,590.

See also

External links

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Biographical information submitted Ballotpedia, April 11, 2012
  2. CSPAN, "Campaign 2012-Election Results From the Associated Press," accessed June 6, 2012