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College student stabs man he believed was Missouri Governor

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January 23, 2011

KANSAS CITY, Missouri: On the two week anniversary of the tragic shooting in Tucson, Arizona that left six people killed and twelve injured, including Democratic United States Senator Gabrielle Giffords, information has begun to come to light of another attempted assassination in September 2010 with details that draw striking parallels to what took place in the American Southwest several months later.

Conservative-leaning bloggers have taken to the internet to complain how the national media failed to seize on a story concerning a mentally disturbed young man who sought to kill a rather high profile Democratic politician. Casey Brezik, a twenty-two year old student at Metropolitan Community College -- Penn Vally who was "diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia several years ago," sprang from a classroom shortly before 10 am, at which time Democratic Governor Jay Nixon was scheduled to give a speech at the community college, and slit the throat of Al Dimmit Jr., the Dean of Instruction at the school.[1] While authorities believe that Brezik had no particular beef against Nixon, the anti-government rants he posted on his Facebook account suggest that he targeted him because he was the state's highest elected governmental official. In addition to being convicted on drug possession, Brezik was committed to mental institutions at least four times in 2007.

The perplexity of this case is that the startling news never left the confines of Kansas City. One political commentator believes that this incident lacked the "political sex appeal" of the Arizona tragedy and that it was difficult to tie Brezik to specific radical political activities, in particular those of Tea Party activists who the national media appeared to link to the shooter in Arizona.[2]

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