Colorado 2013 Gun Legislation Repeal (2014)

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The Colorado 2013 Gun Legislation Repeal did not make the 2014 statewide ballot in the state of Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment. The measure would have repealed all gun legislation passed in the state in 2013, including all that "restrict or limit" the right to bear arms. A separate measure was attempting to repeal the bill that banned large capacity magazines and ensure any future changes are enacted by a vote of the people. Additionally, a pro-gun control group attempted to land a measure on the November ballot that would have banned concealed weapons on college campuses.[1]

Background

In 2013, the Colorado Legislature passed three separate gun control laws: House Bill 1224, which prohibited high capacity magazines, House Bill 1228, which enacted a fee for background checks, and House Bill 1229, which required universal background checks on gun sales, mental health reporting and a judicial process for those who are barred from owning firearms and want to contest.[2]

These highly contested laws came about, in part, as the result of mass shootings in a movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado in July 2012 and in a grade school in Newtown, Connecticut in December 2012.[3] Gun shop owners and Colorado sheriffs were outspoken opponents of the laws. The sheriffs filed a lawsuit against the state, arguing ammunition magazines can be converted to hold more ammunition than the maximum number prescribed by the new law and it would be difficult for private citizens to comply with the expanded background checks.[3] The passage of the bills also triggered efforts to recall Sen. Angela Giron (D-3), Senate President John Morse (D-11) and Sen. Evie Hudak (D-19). Giron and Morse were successfully recalled, and Hudak chose to resign.[4][5]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Colorado

Supporters were required to obtain at least 86,105 valid signatures by August 4, 2014, in order to place the measure on the ballot, regardless of whether the measure was an initiated constitutional amendment or an initiated state statute. Supporters did not submit any signatures by the filing deadline.[6]

On February 18, 2013, the House passed HB 1224 34 to 31. On March 11, 2013, the Senate passed HB 1224 18 to 17. Gov. Hickenlooper signed the bill into law on March 20, 2013.[7][8]

Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1224 House Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 36 55.4%
No2944.6%


Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1224 Senate Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 18 51.4%
No1748.6%

On February 18, 2013, the House passed HB 1228 33 to 32. On March 11, 2013, the Senate passed HB 1228 19 to 16. Gov. Hickenlooper signed the bill into law on March 20, 2013.[9][8]

Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1228 House Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 33 54%
No3246%


Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1228 Senate Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 19 54.3%
No1645.7%

On February 18, 2013, the House passed HB 1229 36 to 29. On March 11, 2013, the Senate passed HB 1229 19 to 16. Gov. Hickenlooper signed the bill into law on March 20, 2013.[10][8]

Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1229 House Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 36 55.4%
No2944.6%


Colorado Gun Laws, HB 1229 Senate Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 19 54.3%
No1645.7%

Related measures

See also

References