Colorado Campaign Finance, Initiative 15 (1996)

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The Colorado Campaign Finance Initiative, also known as Initiative 1996, was on the November 5, 1996 ballot in Colorado as an initiated state statute, where it was approved. The measure limited campaign contributions in the following ways:

  • Limiting the amount of campaign contributions to candidate committees, political committees, and political parties
  • Prohibiting candidate committees and political parties from making or accepting certain contributions
  • Specifying who may contribute to a candidate committee
  • Limiting the amount of unexpended campaign contributions that a candidate can carry over from one campaign to another campaign
  • Creating voluntary campaign spending limits and attendant disclosure requirements[1]

Election results

Colorado Initiative 15 (1996)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 928,148 65.79%
No482,55134.21%

Election results via: The Colorado Legislative Council

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Shall there be an amendment to the Colorado Revised Statutes concerning campaign reform, and, in connection therewith, limiting the amount of campaign contributions to candidate committees, political committees, and political parties; prohibiting candidate committees and political parties from making or accepting certain contributions; specifying who may contribute to a candidate committee; limiting the amount of unexpended campaign contributions that a candidate can carry over from one campaign to another campaign; creating voluntary campaign spending limits and attendant disclosure requirements; and reenacting, with amendments, current campaign reform law definitions and provisions regarding deposits of contributions, limits on cash contributions and expenditures, the prohibition on contribution reimbursement, uses of unexpended contributions, notice and disclosure of independent expenditures, reporting of contributions and expenditures, registration requirements for candidates and committees, civil and criminal sanctions and penalties, expenditures for political advertising, encouraging withdrawal from a campaign, home rule counties and municipalities, and contribution limits on state and political subdivisions and on lobbyists?[2]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 20, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.