Colorado Limited Gaming in Selected Eastern and Southern Cities and Counties, Initiative 4 (1992)

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The Colorado Limited Gaming in Selected Eastern and Southern Cities and Counties Initiative, also known as Initiative 4, was on the November 3, 1992 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have legalized limited gaming in the towns of Burlington, Evans, Lamar, Las Animas, Sterling, Antonito, Garden City, Granada, Holly, Julesburg, Milliken, Ovid, Peetz, and Sedgwick and in the counties of Logan, Prowers and Sedgwick. If the measure had passed, each town and county would have voted to allow the measure's implementation. The measure would have also expanded the types of games where limited gaming was permitted, allowed the General Assembly to increase the maximum single bet above the present five-dollar limit, allocated tax revenues derived from limited gaming activities and changed the tax revenue allocation from the general fund to the public school fund.[1]

Election results

Colorado Initiative 4 (1992)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,087,13672.39%
Yes 414,699 27.61%

Election results via: Colorado State Legislative Council, Ballot History

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Shall there be an amendment to Article XVIII of the Colorado Constitution to permit limited gaming, subject to an affirmative local vote, in the cities and towns of Burlington, Evans, Lamar, Las Animas, Sterling, Antonito, Garden City, Granada, Holly, Julesburg, Milliken, Ovid, Peetz, and Sedgwick and in the counties of Logan, Prowers, and Sedgwick; to add to the types of games which may be conducted where limited gaming is permitted; to allow the General Assembly to increase the maximum single bet above the present five-dollar limit; to allocate tax revenues derived from limited gaming activities; and to change the tax revenue allocation from the general fund to the public school fund if the General Assembly continues school funding at no less than the level established at the 1992 legislative session?[2]

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 20, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.