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Colorado Excess State Revenues for Math and Science Grants, Referendum F (2000)

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The Colorado Excess State Revenues for Math and Science Grants Referendum, also known as Referendum F, was on the November 7, 2000 ballot in Colorado as a legislatively-referred state statute, where it was defeated. The measure would have allowed the state to annually retain up to 50 million dollars of the state revenues in excess of the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending for the 1999-2000 fiscal year and for four succeeding fiscal years for the purpose of funding performance grants for school districts to improve academic performance in math and science.[1]

Election results

Colorado Referendum F (2000)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No887,94755.89%
Yes 697,673 44.11%

Election results via: Colorado State Legislative Council, Ballot History

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Shall the state of Colorado be permitted to annually retain up to fifty million dollars of the state revenues in excess of the constitutional limitation on state fiscal year spending for the 1999-2000 fiscal year and for four succeeding fiscal years for the purpose of funding performance grants for school districts to improve academic performance, notwithstanding any restriction on spending, revenues, or appropriations, including without limitation the restrictions of section 20 of article X of the state constitution and the statutory limitation on state general fund appropriations?[2]

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 24, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.