Colorado Sales Tax for Developmentally Disabled, Initiative 51 (2008)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on Taxes
Taxes.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Colorado
LawsHistory
List of measures

The Colorado State Sales Tax Increase for Services for People with Developmental Disabilities Initiative, also known as Initiative 51, was on the November 2008 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have increased the state sales tax by $185.1 million annually to provide funding for long-term services for persons with developmental disabilities.[1]

Election results

Colorado Initiative 51 (2008)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,414,06562.37%
Yes 853,211 37.63%

Election results via: The Colorado Secretary of State

Ballot title

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

SHALL STATE TAXES BE INCREASED $186.1 MILLION ANNUALLY AFTER FULL IMPLEMENTATION BY AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO REVISED STATUTES CONCERNING AN INCREASE IN THE STATE SALES AND USE TAX TO PROVIDE FUNDING FOR LONG-TERM SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, INCREASING THE RATE OF THE STATE SALES AND USE TAX BEGINNING ON JULY 1, 2009, BY ONE-TENTH OF ONE PERCENT IN EACH OF THE NEXT TWO FISCAL YEARS; PERMITTING THE STATE TO RETAIN AND SPEND ALL REVENUES FROM THE NEW TAX, NOTWITHSTANDING THE STATE SPENDING LIMIT; REQUIRING AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO THE NET REVENUE FROM THE NEW TAX TO BE DEPOSITED IN THE NEWLY CREATED DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES LONG-TERM SERVICES CASH FUND; REQUIRING THE MONEY IN THE FUND TO BE USED TO PROVIDE LONG-TERM SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES; AND PROHIBITING REDUCTIONS IN THE LEVEL OF STATE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE ANNUAL GENERAL APPROPRIATION BILL EXISTING ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS MEASURE FOR LONG-TERM SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES?[2]

Details of the measure

The measure would have included the following provisions:

  • A two-cent state sales tax on every $10 would be added.
  • The tax would be phased in, raising the current state sales tax of 2.9% to 3% the first year and then to 3.1% in the second year.
  • Gasoline, groceries, prescription drugs, medical services, and utilities would remain exempt from the state sales tax.
  • The new tax money would be used to provide services that help the developmentally-disabled with daily living tasks such as food preparation, job training, nursing, and medical needs.[3]

Support

Supporters

The Arc of Colorado, a nonprofit organization, was leading the campaign for the measure.[3] End Colorado's Developmental Disability Wait List is the committee behind the campaign for the measure.

Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin came out against the measure.[4]

Supporters included the following organizations that signed on to support Amendment 51 Initiative to End The Wait List for Persons with Developmental Disabilities:

  • Ability Specialists
  • ACL in Boulder
  • Adams Camp
  • Adaptive AutoMobility
  • Advanced Systems Plus

Campaign finance

End Colorado's Developmental Disability Wait List raised $107,532 in August 2008. Almost half, $51,000, came from The ARC in Jefferson County.[5]

The group raised an additional $64,000 in the first two weeks of September. The largest donors were the Developmental Disabilities Response Center in Lakewood ($25,000) and Imagine in Lafayette ($15,000).[6]

Opposition

Opponents

Taxpayers who believed that the State Legislature should establish spending priorities before increasing the tax burden on residents were opposed to Amendment 51.

Critics of the proposal said residents can not afford a tax hike, and that the higher tax rate would hurt the state's economy. Opponents also said funding levels for such services should be determined as part of the regular budget process of the state Legislature. "Reducing the waiting lists could be accomplished without raising taxes by re-prioritizing how the state spends its money," opponents wrote in the state Blue Book voter guide.

Path to the ballot

Supporters submitted more than 131,000 signatures for the measure, well over the 76,047 valid signatures required, on July 28, 2008.[3] The signatures were certified by the Secretary of State's office on Aug. 11, 2008.[7]

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links

References