SLP Badge Transparent.png
Read the
State Legislative Tracker
New edition available now!




Colorado Uniform Regulation of Livestock Operations, Initiative 13 (1998)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on the
Treatment of Animals
Wolf.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Colorado Constitution
800px-Flag of Colorado.svg.png
Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIIXIXXXXXIXXIIXXIIIXXIVXXVXXVIXXVIIXXVIIIXXIXSchedule

The Colorado Uniform Regulation of Livestock Operations Initiative, also known as Initiative 13, was on the November 3, 1998 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have required uniform application of laws to livestock operations and mandated that laws and regulations concerning livestock operations be based upon the similarity in the potential impact on the environment of the livestock operation. It also would have allowed for distinctions in regulations based upon the type of animal confinement and number of livestock in an operation.[1]

Election results

Amendment 13
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No753,50961.3%
Yes 475,664 38.7%

Election results via: Colorado State Legislative Council, Ballot History

Text of measure

Figure 1: In the colorized image taken c.1900, cowboys brand calves in Colorado.

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

An amendment to the Colorado Constitution requiring the uniform application of laws to livestock operations, and, in connection therewith, mandating that laws and regulations concerning livestock operations be uniform and based upon the similarity in the potential impact on the environment of the livestock operation; making unconstitutional any state law or regulation that does not treat livestock operations uniformly based upon the similarity in the potential impact on the environment of the livestock operation; allowing the general assembly to make a distinction between livestock feeding on the range and livestock feeding in a concentrated animal feeding operation; permitting the general assembly to make a distinction between concentrated animal feeding operations that are smaller than one thousand animal units and those that are larger than one thousand animal units; specifying that one animal unit be considered to be a cow and all other livestock to be fractions of a cow as determined by the general assembly; and defining livestock as cattle, sheep, goats, swine, mules, poultry, horses, and all other animals raised or kept for profit.[2]

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 24, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.