Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations (Select), Texas House of Representatives

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Texas
House of Representatives
SLP badge.png
House Committees

Agriculture and LivestockAppropriations
Business & IndustryCalendars
CorrectionsCounty AffairsCriminal Jurisprudence
CultureDefense & Veterans' Affairs
Economic & Small Business
ElectionsEnergy Resources
Environmental Regulation
General Investigating & EthicsEfficiency & Reform
Higher EducationHomeland Security & Public Safety
House AdministrationHuman ServicesInsurance
International Trade & Intergovernmental Affairs
Investments & Financial Services
Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence
Land & Resource Management
Licensing & Administrative
Local & Consent CalendarsNatural Resources
PensionsPublic Education
Public HealthRedistricting
Rules & Resolutions
Special Purpose DistrictsState Affairs
TechnologyTransportation
Urban AffairsWays & Means

Senate Committees

The Transparency in State Agency Operations is a select committee of the Texas House of Representatives. The committee was formed on January 31, 2013.[1]

In a December 2013 letter to University of Texas Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa, committee co-chairs Carol Alvarado (D) and Dan Flynn (D) said that the committee would continue to monitor the University of Texas System beyond the impeachment trial proceedings. The letter indicated that the committee would be observing the university's reactions to the investigations.[2]

Impeachment of Wallace Hall

See also: Wallace Hall impeachment trial

The primary focus of the committee has been to oversee impeachment proceedings of University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall. Governor of Texas Rick Perry's spokesperson said the investigations send a "chilling message" to gubernatorial appointees.[3]

On June 24, 2013, State House representative Jim Pitts (R) filed a resolution to advance along impeachment proceedings of Hall by the select committee.[4] However, Joe Straus, House Speaker, issued a proclamation the next day that expanded the committee's jurisdiction to allow it to propose articles of impeachment against executive appointees. But it did not begin the impeachment proceedings.[5]

In July 2013, University of Texas Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and Regent Eugene Powell responded to the ongoing investigation and negative remarks against Hall from some elected officials and University of Texas staff. Cigarroa said Hall was not allowed to access anything that was not reviewed by University lawyers to ensure they met federal privacy standards. In a July 15, 2013 letter to state representative Jim Pitts, Powell wrote: "Regent Hall's efforts extend to bringing the U.T. System into a competitive position nationally; especially related to offering blended and online learning opportunities to U.T. students. I would point out Regent Hall's excellent service to the Board in terms of time and energy. I appreciate his Board service and his dedication and hard work designed to fulfill his fiduciary obligations.[6][7]

At a meeting on November 12, 2013, the committee issued subpoenas for Dan Sharphorn, University of Texas Vice Chancellor and General Counsel; Francie Frederick, General Counsel to the University of Texas System Board of Regents; Barbara Holthaus, System Senior Attorney; and Wallace Hall. Hall was expected to testify at the December 10, 2013 meeting. However, only minutes after initially filing the subpoena for Hall, committee members suddenly recalled it. Carol Alvarado said the members acted too quickly without checking their schedule. The subpoena was issued for December 10, but no meeting was scheduled until December 18.[8][9][10]

During testimony, Frederick said Hall may have been in possession of protected student information. "We failed by allowing this to happen," she said. During the meeting, committee member Trey Fischer asked whether possession of the document was a criminal violation. Sharphorn also testified at the meeting. Legislators also voted to issue subpoenas to Francisco Cigarroa and Bill Powers.[11][12]

In December 2013, the organization Empower Texans sent a mailer criticizing committee chair Carol Alvarado. The mailer stated that lawmakers improperly focused on Hall's behavior, rather than investigating the allegations of clout at the University of Texas, Austin. Alvarado called the mailer the action of "an outside group that’s trying to influence an investigation." Empower Texans president Michael Quinn Sullivan said the legislature was engaging in a "whitewashing" of potential university wrongdoings. "We're impeaching someone for asking questions," he said.[13][14]

Costs

The committee hired Rusty Hardin to serve as legal counsel for the committee. Hardin, a well-known Houston attorney, represented former Major League Baseball player Roger Clemens in his steroid trials.[15][16] The legal fees for the case are expected to range from $300 to $525 per hour. Hall is providing for his own legal defense.[17][18] Several committee meetings have been held behind closed doors, which Hall's lawyers have criticized as demonstrating a lack of transparency.[19]

In January 2014, it was reported that Hardin had already billed the state of Texas more than $200,000 for work on the case. The bills to that point had not included work in November and December. Some of the included expenses, as reported by the Dallas Morning News included:[20]

  • $500 for a meeting at an upscale restaurant in Austin, Texas with a "witness" and "chief of staff."[21]
  • $800 per person for two nights at the Austin, Texas Downtown Hampton hotel. Five people total for a cost of $4,000[20]

June 2014 invoice

In June 2014, Hardin submitted a bill covering expenses in November 2013. That bill was for $93,728.66. That bill brought the total price for the first three months of work to more than $300,000.[22] Hardin's official contract ended on March 31, 2014.[23][24][25]

Subpoena of Hall

At a meeting on November 12, 2013, the committee issued subpoenas for Dan Sharphorn, University of Texas Vice Chancellor and General Counsel; Francie Frederick, General Counsel to the University of Texas System Board of Regents; Barbara Holthaus, System Senior Attorney; and Hall, who was expected to testify at the December 10, 2013 meeting.[26][27] However, only minutes after initially filing the subpoena for Hall, committee members suddenly recalled it. Carol Alvarado said the members acted too quickly without checking their schedule. The subpoena was issued for December 10, but no meeting was scheduled until December 18.[28]

With University of Texas Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and University of Texas, Austin President Bill Powers already subpoenaed to appear at the December 18-19 meetings, Hall's lawyer Allan Van Fleet requested that the committee respond regarding whether it would also subpoena Hall. He said that Hall's lawyers have told him not to appear before the committee without a subpoena. On December 5, 2013, Van Fleet sent a letter to the committee requesting that the co-chairs announce whether Hall would indeed be subpoenaed. Van Fleet's request asked for an answer by the end of the day. In response, committee attorney Rusty Hardin said "We're not going to adhere to his deadline. He doesn't get to pick the time and place." Van Fleet pointed out that providing two weeks' notice for testimony is the standard to allow individuals to prepare testimony. He added that the letter has "caused confusion about the committee's intentions."[29]

On December 10, 2013, the committee sent a letter to Hall asking that he testify -- but they did not issue a subpoena. The committee sent a one-page, two-paragraph letter that invited Hall to testify and provide a list of witnesses.[30] On December 16, 2013, Hall's attorney Allan Van Fleet said Hall would not testify at the December 18 committee hearing. Van Fleet wrote: "Regent Hall has volunteered a number of times in the past to share his views with legislative Committees about the challenges and opportunities faced by the UT System. Though these offers have never been accepted, he remains interested in sharing his views, in collaborating with all policy makers on initiatives that will benefit the UT System, and in working with the committees to improve the transparency and accountability practices that should guide all UT System activities."[31][32][33][34]

Hall was invited to testify but was not given a subpoena, which is often perceived to provide some legal protection to the witness. Other individuals -- such as Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa and University of Texas Austin President Bill Powers -- have been given formal subpoenas. Legislators criticized Hall for not agreeing to testify, despite the differing set of circumstances given to Hall. "It’s very disappointing to me that he and his attorney do not understand or do not care to observes the rules and procedures of the Texas House of Representatives and have decided they are not going to appear to testify," said co-chair Dan Flynn.[35][36]

Committee meetings


Seal of Texas.svg.png

University of Texas Investigations

Background
Wallace Hall impeachment trialPolitical favoritism in admissions to the University of TexasForgivable loans program at the University of Texas Law School House Select Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations (TSAO)Joint Committee on Oversight of Higher Ed Governance, Excellence & Transparency

UT Regents
Wallace HallPaul FosterEugene PowellSteven HicksErnest AlisedaJeffery HildebrandBrenda PejovichAlex CranbergRobert Stillwell

Elected Officials
Rick PerryJoe StrausCharles PerryTrey FischerDan FlynnNaomi GonzalezEric JohnsonLyle LarsonCarol AlvaradoFour PriceJim PittsDan Branch

UT Individuals
Bill PowersLarry SagerBarry BurgdorfKevin HegartyFrancisco CigarroaCarol Longoria

In September 2013, Dan Flynn, co-chair of the select committee, said three basic questions would be asked during the process.[37]

  1. Did Hall fail to disclose material information on his application to be a regent?[38]
  2. Did he reveal information about students that violated their privacy?[38]
  3. Did he exceed his role as a regent in requesting massive amounts of information from UT-Austin?[38]

Cross-examination

Hall's lawyers asked for the right to cross-examine statements to the committee. However, members of the committee rejected the request.[39] Hall's attorney said "Today, we heard the committee spend 10 minutes of platitude on transparency and spend two hours in secrecy. It’s important that the full story come out, not just the limited amount Mr. Hardin may decide is relevant."[40] When Governor of Texas James Ferguson was impeached in 1917, cross-examination was allowed. In 1975, Judge O.P. Carrillo was impeached, and his case had cross-examination on a limited scope.[41][42]

July 15, 2013

Jeff Archer, chief legislative counsel for the Texas Legislative Council, testified that the impeachment process is murky and very few attempts have been made in the state's history to impeach public officials. He cited no prior examples of any impeachment process existing for an official other than a governor or judge.[43]

October 22, 2013

During the meeting on October 22, 2013, committee member Charles Perry asserted that mishandling of student information should fall on the shoulders of the organization that is handing out the information -- in this case, Kevin Hegarty and his office as opposed to the individual who receives the documents. Hegarty disagreed with the statement.[44] Pitts alleged that Hall is undermining the prominence of the University of Texas while trying to bring about the "resignation or firing of President Bill Powers." Pitts has been a central proponent of the impeachment investigation.[45]

Pitts acknowledged that he routinely writes letters to Bill Powers, President of the University of Texas, on behalf of select student applications. Specifically, he wrote a letter on behalf of his son after the University of Texas law school had initially rejected his admittance. "The letter I wrote for my son was pretty much a form letter," Pitts said in an October meeting of the committee. These letters were sent to both the law school dean and the university president.[46][47][48]

November 12, 2013

The committee issued subpoenas for Dan Sharphorn, University of Texas Vice Chancellor and General Counsel; Francie Frederick, General Counsel to the University of Texas System Board of Regents; Barbara Holthaus, System Senior Attorney; and Hall, who was expected to testify at the December 10, 2013 meeting.[49][50] However, only minutes after initially filing the subpoena for Hall, committee members suddenly recalled it. Carol Alvarado said the members acted too quickly without checking their schedule. The subpoena was issued for December 10, but no meeting was scheduled until December 18.[51]

During testimony, Frederick said Hall may have been in possession of protected student information. "We failed by allowing this to happen," she said. During the meeting, committee member Trey Fischer asked whether possession of the document was a criminal violation. Fischer did not specify what the crime was. Additionally, the law that Fischer was referring to does not apply to universities and would therefore not apply in this situation.[52] Sharphorn also testified at the meeting. Legislators also voted to issue subpoenas to Francisco Cigarroa and Bill Powers to appear at the December 18, 2013 meeting.[53][54][55] A scheduled November 13, 2013 meeting was canceled after the committee completed all necessary business.[56]

December 18-19, 2013

Although the committee was slated to meet on Wednesday and Thursday (December 18-19), Hardin said that the meetings would likely only take place for one day. "Unless Wallace Hall has a change of heart and wants to show up, we won’t be there on Thursday," he said.[57]

At the December 18, 2013 meeting, Bill Powers and Francisco Cigarroa testified to the committee. Additionally, two former regents testified -- H. Scott Caven Jr. and John Barnhill. Cigarroa was questioned for more than 3 hours. Committee counsel Rusty Hardin discussed new evidence that had not previously been revealed. He said that earlier in the year, Hall had inquired about seizing some computers from the University of Texas Law School. Cigarroa confirmed the account, but said that the inquiry had not been executed.[58][59]

Despite not providing Hall with a subpoena, committee legislators called it a "slap in the face" that Hall did not testify. While nearly all individuals who testified were given an official subpoena, Hall himself was not granted one. In fact, it was more directly avoided by the committee, after it first sent him a subpoena only to withdraw it.[60][61] Committee co-chairs Carol Alvarado and Dan Flynn (R) released a joint statement: "Our invitation to Regent Hall still stands. We are eager to hear from him, and are prepared to accommodate his testimony."[62] Flynn said he hoped to wrap up the process by the end of the year and that the committee would move forward regardless of whether Hall testifies.[63][64]

Some of the commentary during testimony from the four witnesses:[65]

  • Powers: Said that the controversy surrounding his employment was a large distraction. He said it hurt the university's ability to recruit faculty and staff.[65] Powers added that the situation did "significant harm to our reputation in the academic world nationally and internationally."[66] Powers estimated that the records requests cost the university more than $1 million.[67]
  • Cigarroa: Said that there has been a bit of a distraction over the past year because of voluminous requests on one campus. He admitted that Hall had approached him about the controversy surrounding law professor salaries and admission policies.[65] He said that Hall had never approached him about firing Powers.[68] He added that Hall has the right to ask questions, with the University then responding as best it can.[69]
  • Caven: Said that it was inappropriate for an individual regent to act on his or her own accord without first sharing the mission of his actions to the rest of the board.[65]
  • Barnhill: Agreed with Caven and said regents should function as a board moving in a single direction.[65]

The committee canceled the December 19 meeting. The next item on the agenda will be a summary of options from counsel, Rusty Hardin, based on the information and testimony gathered. Hardin's report will be compiled over the next several weeks and then presented to the committee for review. The report could recommend impeachment, which would then require convening the full house.[70]

Favoritism and impeachment reports

A report commissioned by the University of Texas concerning allegations of admissions favoritism was expected to be released in early April 2014. According to Watchdog.org, the report will show that "applicants who had a lawmaker intervene on their behalf with top university officials were far more likely to gain admission than an applicant without those connections."[71]

The legislative committee pursuing the impeachment of Wallace Hall was also expected to release its report in early April. Citing unnamed "sources familiar with the matter," Watchdog.org reported that the committee's leaders intend to use their report to counter the potential impact of the admissions favoritism report.[71]

Impeachment hearings committee report

On April 7, 2014, the San Antonio Express-News and Houston Chronicle viewed an advance copy of Hardin's 176-page report. The newspapers reported that the document was previously made available to committee members on April 4, 2014. The report alleges that Hall broke state and federal law. As of April 8, 2014, the report was not yet made public. Hall's lawyers said he would not comment on the report until he had seen it. According to the newspaper summary, the report alleges that Hall attempted to coerce UT administrators prior to their testimony.[72][73] The report refers to Hall's "burdensome" requests for records as one of the critiques laid out against the regent.[74]

The Texas Tribune, which also received a copy of the report, wrote that "ironically a substantial number of the actions that the Hardin report highlights as potentially triggering impeachment occurred in part or entirely because of the committee’s investigation." The report listed four items as a sufficient basis for articles of impeachment. The report does not make any explicit recommendation to the committee.[75]

The draft report recommended to the committee that impeachment could be pursued for at least four bases.[76]

Post-report meetings

On April 24, 2014, the committee met privately for three hours discussing Hardin's report. Legislators would not disclose the conversations held behind closed doors.[77][78][79][80]

A committee hearing was held on May 12, 2014 where legislators voted 7-1 that there were grounds for impeachment. Committee co-chair Dan Flynn (R) called the vote a "historical time."[81] Charles Perry (R) was the one representative who voted against grounds for impeachment. In response to the vote, Hall released a statement, in which he defended his actions and accused the transparency committee of interfering with investigations of the University. "My efforts as a regent are to serve the interests of our great educational institutions, the students, faculty, and staff who make them great, and the taxpayers who fund them, not to appease a privileged class who abuse them," Hall said in the statement.[82][83]

Reaction

Anne Neal, president of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA), said the investigation of Hall was "simply off the rails." Throughout much of the investigation, legislators have maintained that Hall was on a "witch hunt" for President Bill Powers. Neal's statement took the opposite approach, accusing the legislature of engaging in an "expensive witch hunts designed to discourage public servants from asking tough questions in pursuit of the public interest." According to its website, the ACTA is "an independent, non-profit organization committed to academic freedom, excellence, and accountability at America's colleges and universities."[84] The Texas Coalition for Higher Education Excellence supported the report's conclusions. Spokeswoman Jenifer Sarver called the findings, "deeply troubling."[85]

After the release of the report, Hall's lawyers sent a letter on April 8, 2014 to the committee on transparency. In the letter, Hall's lawyers requested that a copy of the report be sent to their offices, as they had not been delivered a version prior to the leak of the report to the media.[86]

In light of the report, editors at the Houston Chronicle called for Hall to resign.[87]

Hall's lawyers' response to the report

On May 6, 2014, Hall's attorney Allan Van Fleet sent a letter to the Transparency Committee in response to the report issued by Rusty Hardin. Van Fleet accused the committee of withholding information that would "exonerate Regent Hall from all of the committee's charges." The letter alleged that the committee "manipulated the process to prevent public exposure to the truth."[88]

Van Fleet's May 6 letter made reference to a previously sent letter on April 25, 2014, that requested the release of an audio recording from an August 22, 2013 University of Texas System Board of Regents board meeting. According to the letter, a recording made by Regent Alex Cranberg at the meeting pinpoints the exact position of the Regent members regarding President Bill Powers' employment situation. The letter maintained it is a key piece of evidence that has not been released to the public. Hall's lawyers requested that the recording be released and sent to the Travis County District Attorney. The Texas Tribune also requested the recording. University of Texas System officials then asked the Attorney General for permission to withhold the recording.[89][90]

The letter from Van Fleet lists seven facts that he alleges refutes the committee's assertions. Those facts listed were as follows:[91]

  1. "Regent Hall fully disclosed information on his nomination application"[91]
  2. "Regent Hall did not violate FERPA protections"[91]
  3. "Regent Hall did not “leak” or otherwise disclose student information"[91]
  4. "Regent Hall properly represented the UT System in discussions about charitable donations"[91]
  5. "Regent Hall’s information requests were reasonable and necessary"[91]
  6. "Regent Hall did not tamper with or coerce testimony"[91]

Letters leaked between committee members

Just before the May 12, 2014 hearing, several letters between members of the committee were leaked to the media. Committee co-chair Dan Flynn (R) wrote to his fellow committee members that while he disagreed with Hall's tactics, there did not appear to be legal ground to move forward with impeachment. Flynn wrote, "The precedent set by doing so would subject everyone on a board or committee throughout the state to be subject to a level of scrutiny that would make their tenure more about personality than performance." In response to Flynn, committee member Eric Johnson (D) recommended that the committee delay its vote, pending the investigation by the Travis County prosecutors. Johnson wrote that the letter was "confusing."[92][93][94] In Flynn's letter, he recognized that Hall's investigations uncovered real problems within the state. Flynn did not agree with Hall's methods, but he detailed four specific scandals (among 10 recommended next steps).[95]

Flynn specifically offered his thoughts on each of the four charges laid out by Rusty Hardin in the draft report. Flynn detailed his rebuttals to each of those points.[96] Flynn recommended asking Governor of Texas Rick Perry (R) to step in and ask Hall to resign.[97]

Flynn's letter reportedly copied elements of a previously published report in the American Spectator. Reporter Jon Cassidy published an article on April 16, 2014 in the American Spectator under the headline, "The University of Texas Show Trial." In this article, he defended Hall's actions and criticized the committee's impeachment hearings. The article contained a typo regarding the word "statute" in which it appeared as "statue"[sic]. Flynn's letter contained the same typo and similar wording throughout his letter, which Cassidy pointed out in a follow-up report in the magazine.[98][99]

Membership

2013-2014

The following table describes committee membership at the beginning of the 2013 legislative session.

Transparency in State Agency Operations (Select) Members, 2013
Democratic members (4)Republican members (4)
Carol Alvarado, Co-ChairDan Flynn, Co-Chair
Naomi GonzalesLyle Larson
Eric JohnsonCharles Perry
Trey Martinez FischerFour Price

Committee minutes

2013

The following video links come from the official committee operations website.[100]

Contact

  • Clerk: Richard Ramirez, Matthew Posey
  • Address: JHR 310
  • Phone: 512-463-8160

See also

External links

References

  1. Texas Legislature Online, "Committee Membership History," accessed October 30, 2013
  2. Daily Texan Online, "Transparency committee to monitor UT System through directives," January 12, 2014
  3. Texas Tribune, "Transparency Committee to Mull Impeachment of UT Regent," June 25, 2013
  4. Alcalde, "Pitts Files Resolution to Impeach UT Regent Wallace Hall," June 24, 2013
  5. Texas Tribune, "On Impeachment Probe, Committee in Uncharted Waters," July 15, 2013
  6. Texas Tribune, "UT System Pushes Back Against Criticism of Regent Hall," July 16, 2013
  7. University of Texas System, "Letter from Eugene Powell to Jim Pitts," July 15, 2013
  8. Texas Tribune, "Committee Recalls Subpoena for UT Regent Hall," November 12, 2013
  9. Texas Tribune, "UT Regent Hall Subpoenaed to Testify Before Committee," November 12, 2013
  10. Albany Times Union, "Texas House committee subpoenas Hall for Dec. 10," November 12, 2013
  11. Texas Tribune, "UT System Lawyer: Hall May Have Shared Private Info," November 12, 2013
  12. Austin American Statesman, "UT Regent Wallace Hall might have broken privacy laws, panel members suggest," November 12, 2013
  13. Houston Chronicle, "Empower Texans mailer criticizes Hall impeachment panel," December 19, 2013
  14. My San Antonio, "Clout Mailer from Empower Texans," December 19, 2013
  15. My San Antonio, "Pitts denounces UT regent’s document requests," October 22, 2013
  16. Houston Chronicle, "Impeachment committee hires Rusty Hardin," August 23, 2013
  17. Austin American Statesman, "UT impeachment inquiry shaping up as battle of lawyers," September 15, 2013
  18. Austin Business Journal, "UT regent investigation will bring huge legal bills," September 16, 2013
  19. Watchdog.org, "Texas transparency committee maps out impeachment steps – in secret," September 17, 2013
  20. 20.0 20.1 Dallas Morning News, "Bills for UT regent investigation topping $200,000," January 10, 2014
  21. The Republic, "Report: Legal costs for investigation of embattled UT regent Wallace Hall topping $200K," January 12, 2014
  22. Houston Chronicle, "Price tag for Hall impeachment investigation tops $300K," June 10, 2014
  23. Watchdog, "At $1,350 for an email, Hardin’s legal bill is headed for high six figures," June 11, 2014
  24. Rusty Hardin & Associates, "Bill for services in November 2013," Published June 11, 2014
  25. Dallas Morning News, "Bill for UT regent investigations topping $300,000," June 11, 2014
  26. Texas Tribune, "UT Regent Hall Subpoenaed to Testify Before Committee," November 12, 2013
  27. Albany Times Union, "Texas House committee subpoenas Hall for Dec. 10," November 12, 2013
  28. Texas Tribune, "Committee Recalls Subpoena for UT Regent Hall," November 12, 2013
  29. Texas Tribune, "Ahead of Hearings, UT Regent Hall Requests Subpoena," December 5, 2013
  30. Texas Tribune, "Committee Letter to Hall," December 10, 2013
  31. My San Antonio, "Letter to Committee," December 16, 2013
  32. The Republic, "Embattled UT Regent Wallace Hall won't testify to lawmakers considering possible impeachment," December 17, 2013
  33. Your Houston News, "UT regent facing possible ouster won’t testify," December 17, 2013
  34. Texas Tribune, "UT Regent Hall Declines Invitation to Testify," December 17, 2013
  35. Dallas Morning News, "UT regent Wallace Hall won’t attend impeachment investigation," December 17, 2013
  36. Texas Public Radio, "UT Regent Wallace Hall Declines to Speak with Lawmakers," December 16, 2013
  37. Texas Monthly, "Regent Wallace Hall is Another Step Closer to Impeachment," September 17, 2013
  38. 38.0 38.1 38.2 Austin American Statesman, "Transparency panel begins investigation of UT regent with closed-door session," September 16, 2013
  39. Austin American Statesman, "Wallace Hall impeachment investigation heats up," September 25, 2013
  40. Daily Texan Online, "Cross-examination not allowed in UT System Regent Wallace Hall investigation," September 17, 2013
  41. Alcalde, "Transparency Committee Sets Agenda for Regent Investigation," September 16, 2013
  42. Texas Tribune, "How Will UT Regent Impeachment Probe Play Out?," September 25, 2013
  43. Texas Tribune, "On Impeachment Probe, Committee in Uncharted Waters," July 15, 2013
  44. Dallas Morning News, "UT, Powers under fire, according to early testimony during regent investigation," October 22, 2013
  45. Dallas Morning News, "Texas House budget chief says Dallas Regent Wallace Hall attacking UT, its president," October 22, 2013
  46. National Review, "The Ongoing Texas Travesty," October 23, 2013
  47. Watchdog, "Lawmaker admits pulling strings on UT admissions," October 23, 2013
  48. National Review, "The Curious and Curiouser Case of Wallace Hall," August 21, 2013
  49. Texas Tribune, "UT Regent Hall Subpoenaed to Testify Before Committee," November 12, 2013
  50. Albany Times Union, "Texas House committee subpoenas Hall for Dec. 10," November 12, 2013
  51. Texas Tribune, "Committee Recalls Subpoena for UT Regent Hall," November 12, 2013
  52. Watchdog.org, "Need to cover up a scandal? Just say FERPA," November 20, 2013
  53. San Francisco Chronicle, "Texas House subpoenas Hall, but then recalls it," November 12, 2013
  54. Texas Tribune, "UT System Lawyer: Hall May Have Shared Private Info," November 12, 2013
  55. Austin American Statesman, "UT Regent Wallace Hall might have broken privacy laws, panel members suggest," November 12, 2013
  56. Texas Tribune, "Between Fisher and Fawcett, a Big Day in Court for UT," November 13, 2013
  57. Texas Tribune, "Committee Investigating Hall Nears End of Inquiry," December 18, 2013
  58. Austin American Statesman, "Case against University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall Jr. takes shape," December 18, 2013
  59. The Republic, "House committee mulling impeachment of UT regent Hall scold his silence as hearings resume," December 18, 2013
  60. News Journal, "Lawmaker: Regent’s silence ’slap in face’" December 19, 2013
  61. Dallas Morning News, "Regent’s inquiry has damaged University of Texas, school president contends," December 18, 2013
  62. Lubbock Avalanche Journal, "UT Regent facing possible ouster won't testify," December 18, 2013
  63. My San Antonio, "Impeachment panel may move without UT regent's testimony," December 17, 2013
  64. Texas Tribune, "Committee nears conclusion of impeachment probe," December 18, 2013
  65. 65.0 65.1 65.2 65.3 65.4 The Horn, "Powers testifies before House transparency committee," December 18, 2013
  66. My San Antonio, "Powers says questions about regents support hurt UT Austin," December 18, 2013
  67. Daily Texan, "In testimony, President Powers estimates cost of Regent Hall's records exceed $1 million," December 18, 2013
  68. Fort Worth Business Press, "Lawmaker: UT regent's silence a 'slap in the face'," December 19, 2013
  69. Austin American Statesman, "University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall’s conduct called 'slap in the face' to House panel," December 18, 2013
  70. KXAN "Impeachment hearing canceled for Thursday" December 18, 2013
  71. 71.0 71.1 Watchdog.org, "Reports on UT favoritism, impeachment expected soon," April 4, 2014
  72. Houston Chronicle, "Report: UT regent abused office, may have violated law," April 7, 2014
  73. Dallas Morning News, "UT regent Wallace Hall possibly committed impeachable offenses, investigation report show," April 7, 2014
  74. Austin American Statesman, "Report for House panel finds grounds to impeach UT Regent Wallace L. Hall Jr.," April 7, 2014
  75. Texas Tribune, "Report Cites Possible Grounds for Hall's Impeachment," April 8, 2014
  76. Rusty Hardin & Associates, LLP, "Investigative Report to the House Select Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations regarding Conduct by University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall and Impeachment Under the June 25, 2013 Proclamation," March 2014
  77. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named april_meeting
  78. Texas Tribune, "Committee to Vote on Impeachment Recommendation in May," April 24, 2014
  79. Austin American Statesman, "Panel investigating UT Regent Wallace Hall sets May 12 vote for possible impeachment recommendation," April 24, 2014
  80. Texas State Legislature, "Notice of public hearing," April 24, 2014
  81. San Francisco Chronicle, "Texas House panel set to vote on Hall impeachment," May 11, 2014
  82. Texas Tribune, "Panel Votes That Grounds for Impeachment Exist for Hall," May 12, 2014
  83. Dallas Morning News, "Texas House panel finds grounds to impeach UT System regent Wallace Hall of Dallas," May 12, 2014
  84. American Council of Trustees and Alumni, "Statement from ACTA President Anne Neal on UT Trustee Wallace Hall," April 9, 2014
  85. Texas Tribune, "Higher Ed Group: Regent Investigation "Off the Rails"," April 9, 2014
  86. Texas Tribune, "Letter from Stephen Ryan to Carol Alvarado and Dan Flynn," April 8, 2014
  87. Houston Chronicle, "Step down, please," April 11, 2014
  88. Austin American-Statesman, "UT regent’s lawyer accuses panel of withholding information," May 6, 2014
  89. Texas Tribune, "Hall's Lawyer Accuses Committee of Withholding Information," May 6, 2014
  90. Watchdog, "Attorney: Secret tape covered up by lawmakers proves regent’s innocence," May 7, 2014
  91. 91.0 91.1 91.2 91.3 91.4 91.5 91.6 Texas Tribune, "Letter from Van Fleet to the Committee on May 6, 2014
  92. Texas Tribune, "Letter from Eric Johnson to Dan Flynn," May 8, 2014
  93. Houston Chronicle, "Letters between Wallace Hall committee members leak," May 8, 2014
  94. Dallas Morning News, "House panel appears divided on UT Regent Wallace Hall’s impeachment," May 8, 2014
  95. 95.0 95.1 Texas Tribune, "Letter from Dan Flynn to Eric Johnson," May 6, 2014
  96. Watchdog.org, "Captain of University of Texas impeachment ship jumps overboard," May 9, 2014
  97. Texas Tribune, "Flynn: "Obnoxious Attitude" Not a Basis for Impeachment," May 8, 2014
  98. American Spectator, "The University of Texas Show Trial," April 16, 2014
  99. American Spectator, "The Screw Turns at the University of Texas," May 14, 2014
  100. Texas house of Representatives, "Committee Broadcast Archives: Transparency in State Agency Operations" accessed October 30, 2013