Crude oil

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Policypedia
Policypedia energy logo.PNG
State energy policy

State fracking policy

Energy policy terms

Fracking in the U.S.

Energy use in the U.S.

Energy policy in the U.S.

State environmental policy


See also
Local fracking on the ballot

Statewide fracking on the ballot

Crude oil is a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons mined from under the earth’s surface. Crude oil can be refined into diesel and jet fuel, propane, butane, ethane and gasoline.[1]

Production

Crude oil production in the United States from 1920 to 2014.

In 2014, U.S. crude oil production reached its highest level since 1987, producing nearly 8.5 million barrels per day in July 2014. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimated that in 2015 crude oil production will be the highest annual average level of crude oil production since 1972.[2]

The table below ranks each state's crude oil production (as of July 2014).

Crude oil production in all 50 states (2014)[3]
Rank State Crude Oil Production

(thousand barrels)

1 Texas 96,168
2 North Dakota 34,430
3 California 17,101
4 Alaska 13,091
5 Oklahoma 10,946
6 New Mexico 10,281
7 Colorado 7,079
8 Wyoming 6,573
9 Louisiana 5,940
10 Kansas 4,166
11 Utah 3,093
12 Montana 2,876
13 Mississippi 2,006
14 Illinois 839
15 Alabama 791
16 Ohio 731
17 Michigan 639
18 Arkansas 594
19 West Virginia 537
20 Pennsylvania 471
21 Nebraska 337
22 Indiana 220
23 Florida 188
24 South Dakota 144
25 Kentucky 110
26 Nevada 29
27 New York 27
28 Tennessee 26
29 Missouri 17
30 Arizona 7
31 Virginia 1

Uses of crude oil

Crude oil is used primarily for transportation fuels, fuel for heating and generating electricity, road oil, and chemicals used to make plastics and other synthetic materials. According to the EIA, roughly 74 percent of the 6.89 billion barrels of oil used in 2013 throughout the United States were used for gasoline, heating oil and jet fuel.[4]

See also

References