Dan Boren

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dan Boren
Dan Boren.jpeg
U.S. House, Oklahoma, District 2
Former Representative
In office
January 3, 2005-January 3, 2013
PartyDemocratic
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 2, 2010
First electedNovember 2, 2004
Term limitsN/A
Education
Bachelor'sTexas Christian University, 1997
Master'sOklahoma University, 2001
Personal
BirthdayAugust 2, 1973
Place of birthShawnee, Oklahoma
Net worth$2,289,518
ReligionMethodist

Dan Boren (b. August 2, 1973) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the state of Oklahoma. Boren represented Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District from 2005 to 2013. He chose to retire rather than seek re-election in 2012.

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Boren is a "centrist Democrat."[1]

Career

Committee assignments

U.S. House

2011-2012

Boren served on the following committees:[2]

Issues

Specific votes

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Boren voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 172 Democrats who voted in favor of the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[3]

Elections

2014

See also: United States Senate special election in Oklahoma, 2014

Boren announced in January 2014 that he did not have any plans to run in the special election for Tom Coburn's Senate seat.[4]

2012

See also: Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District elections, 2012

Boren did not run for re-election in 2012.[5] Markwayne Mullin (R) defeated Rob Wallace (D) and Michael Fulks (I) in the general election.

2010

On November 2, 2010, Boren won re-election to the United States House of Representatives. He defeated Charles Thompson in the general election.[6]

U.S. House of Representatives, Oklahoma Congressional District Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngDan Boren Incumbent 56.5% 108,203
     Republican Charles Thompson 43.5% 83,226
Total Votes 191,429

Campaign donors

2010

Boren won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. During that re-election cycle, Boren's campaign committee raised a total of $1,615,296 and spent $1,833,029.[7]

His top 5 contributors between 2009-2010 were:

U.S. House of Representatives, Oklahoma Congressional District Election, 2010 - Dan Boren Campaign Contributions
Total Raised $1,615,296
Total Spent $1,833,029
Total Raised by General Election Opponent $35,394
Total Spent by General Election Opponent $24,756
Top contributors to Dan Boren's campaign committee
Nix, Patterson & Roach$30,600
Williams Companies$16,400
Chesapeake Energy$14,800
Clean Energy Fuels Corp$14,700
Devon Energy$11,800
Top 5 industries that contributed to campaign committee
Oil & Gas$229,050
Lawyers/Law Firms$111,699
Commercial Banks$62,442
Casinos/Gambling$51,550
Health Professionals$47,000

Personal Gain Index

Congressional Personal Gain Index graphic.png
See also: Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress)

The Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress) is a four-part measurement that illustrates the extent to which members of the U.S. Congress have prospered during their tenure as public servants.
It consists of four different metrics:

PGI: Change in net worth

See also: Changes in Net Worth of U.S. Senators and Representatives (Personal Gain Index) and Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives
Net Worth Metric graphic.png

Between 2004 and 2012, Boren's calculated net worth[8] increased by 205.7 percent. Between 2004 and 2012, the average annual percentage increase for a member of Congress was 15.4 percent.[9]

Dan Boren Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2004$718,927
2012$2,198,017
Growth from 2004 to 2012:206%
Average annual growth:26%[10]
Comparatively, the American citizen experienced a median yearly decline in net worth of -0.94%.[11]
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

Analysis

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Boren paid his congressional staff a total of $1,144,152 in 2011. Overall, Oklahoma ranked 19th in average salary for representative staff. The average U.S. House of Representatives congressional staff was paid $954,912.20 in fiscal year 2011.[12]

Net worth

See also: Changes in Net Worth of U.S. Senators and Representatives (Personal Gain Index) and Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives

2011

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Boren's net worth as of 2011 was estimated between $1,148,038 to $3,430,998. That averages to $2,289,518, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic House members in 2011 of $5,107,874. His average calculated net worth[13] increased by 29.50% from 2010.[14]

2010

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Boren's net worth as of 2010 was estimated between $925,018 to $2,610,998. That averages to $1,768,008 which was lower than the average net worth of Democratic members in 2010 of $4,465,875.[15]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

2012

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Boren ranked 188th in the liberal rankings among members of the U.S. House.[16]

2011

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Boren ranked 196th in the liberal rankings among members of the U.S. House.[17]

Voting with party

Dan Boren voted with the Democratic Party 49.4 percent of the time, which ranked 192 among the 192 House Democratic members as of December 2011.[18]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Dan + Boren + Oklahoma + House

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Dan Boren News Feed

  • Loading...

Personal

Boren is married to Andrea. They have 1 child.

External links


References

  1. GovTrack, "Boren" accessed May 15, 2012
  2. Congressman Dan Boren, Serving Oklahoma's 2nd Congressional District, "Legislative Issues"
  3. U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013
  4. Sun Herald, "Dems say 'no' to run for Okla's US Senate seat," accessed January 22, 2014
  5. Sequoyah County Times, "The candidates are:" April 13, 2012
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"
  7. Open Secrets, "Dan Boren 2010 Election Cycle," accessed November 16, 2011
  8. This figure represents the total percentage growth from either 2004 (if the member entered office in 2004 or earlier) or their first year in office (as noted in the chart below).
  9. This number was found by dividing each member's total net worth growth percentage by the number of years included in the calculation.
  10. This figure represents the total percentage growth divided by the number of years for which there are net worth figures for each member.
  11. This figure was calculated using median asset data from the Census Bureau. Please see the Congressional Net Worth data for Ballotpedia spreadsheet for more information on this calculation.
  12. Boren.html LegiStorm, "Dan Boren," accessed September 24, 2012
  13. This figure represents the total percentage growth from either 2004 (if the member entered office in 2004 or earlier) or their first year in office (as noted in the chart below).
  14. OpenSecrets, "Dan Boren (D-Okla), 2011," accessed February 22, 2013
  15. OpenSecrets, "Earl Blumenauer (D-Okla), 2010," accessed September 24, 2012
  16. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," March 7, 2013
  17. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," accessed February 23, 2012
  18. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
Political offices
Preceded by
Brad Carson
U.S. House of Representatives - Oklahoma District 2
2005–2013
Succeeded by
Markwayne Mullin (R)