Defining public records

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Deliberative Process Exemption


How a state defines the term "public records" can have critical implications for judicial and legislative decisions regarding exemptions and areas in which the law may not apply. Below is a list of various states' definitions of public records within their statutory laws:

Select a state


Here is a list of definitions of public record by state:

West Virginia Freedom of Information Act

West Virginia law defines records as "any writing containing information relating to the conduct of the public's business, prepared, owned and retained by a public body."[1]

Exemptions

Notable exemptions include but are not limited to:

  • Trade secrets
  • Personal information
  • Examinations,
  • Law enforcement investigations
  • Archaeological and historic sites
  • Financial investigations
  • Internal memoranda
  • Security information for individuals infrastructure and electronics

[2]

==== Deliberative process====

Wisconsin Open Records Law

Wisconsin defines record as any document, regardless of physical form, that "has been created or is being kept by" an agency.[1]

Exemptions

Notable exceptions include but are not limited to:

  • Draft notes and other preparatory material[2]
  • Personally identifiable information that would pose a threat to the individual identified
  • Trade Secrets
  • Personal information of employees
  • Security information
  • Financial identifying information

However, Wisconsin law dictates that departments separate exempt from non-exempt material within the same source and release non-exempt material.[3]

==== Deliberative process====

See also

External links

References