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Delaware elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Delaware held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate (1 seat) Approveda Preview Article
U.S. House (9 seats) Approveda
State Executives (3 state executive positions) Approveda Preview Article
State Senate (21 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (41 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (0 measures) Defeatedd N/A

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

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See also: United States Senate elections in Delaware, 2012
U.S. Senate, Delaware General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngThomas Carper Incumbent 66.7% 252,892
     Republican Kevin Wade 28.7% 108,957
     Green Andrew Richard Groff 0.8% 3,036
     Independent Alexander Pires 3.8% 14,462
Total Votes 379,347
Source: Delaware Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Delaware, 2012
Members of the U.S. House from Delaware -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 1 1
     Republican Party 0 0
Total 1 1
District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
At-large Democratic Party John Carney
Republican Party Tom Kovach
Libertarian Party Scott Gesty
Green PartyBernard August
John Carney John Carney No

See also: Delaware state executive official elections, 2012

Three state executive positions were up for election.

Governor of Delaware General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJack Markell Incumbent 69.3% 275,993
     Republican Jeff Cragg 28.6% 113,793
     Libertarian Jesse McVay 0.9% 3,668
     Green Mark Joseph Perri 1.1% 4,575
Total Votes 398,029
Election Results via Delaware Board of Elections.
Lieutenant Governor of Delaware General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMatthew Denn Incumbent 61.6% 238,959
     Republican Sher Valenzuela 37.1% 143,978
     Libertarian Margie Waite-McKeown 1.3% 5,206
Total Votes 388,143
Election Results via Delaware State Board of Elections.
Delaware Insurance Commissioner General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngKaren Weldin Stewart Incumbent 61.1% 233,354
     Republican Benjamin Mobley 36.8% 140,669
     Libertarian David R. Eisenhour 2.1% 7,838
Total Votes 381,861
Election Results via Delaware State Board of Elections.


See also: Delaware State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Democrats maintained partisan control in the state senate.

Delaware State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 14 13
     Republican Party 7 8
Total 21 21


See also: Delaware House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Democrats maintained partisan control in the state house.

Delaware House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 26 27
     Republican Party 15 14
Total 41 41


Eligibility to Vote

Delaware

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Delaware was one of 21 states to use a strictly closed primary system. Voters were required to register to vote in the primary by August 18, 2012, which was 24 days before the primary took place.[1] (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote was 24 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 13.[2]

  • Voter ID info
  • Residency requirements: Resident (proof required)[3]
  • Same-day registration: None

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

You are eligible to vote absentee in an election if you cannot make it to the polls on election day for one of the following reasons:[4]

  • Work: The nature of your work prevents you from going to your polling place (this includes students).
  • Public Service: Your service to the United States or to the State of Delaware prevents you from going to your polling place. Spouses or dependents of the person in service also qualify. (Public service includes military, American Red Cross, etc.)
  • International: You are temporarily residing outside of the United States.
  • Religion: The tenets or teaching of your religion prevent you from going to your polling place.
  • Vacation: You are on vacation on election day.
  • Illness: you are sick.
  • Disability: You are permanently or temporarily disabled.
  • Incarceration: You cannot make it to the polls because you are incarcerated.

Deadlines

To vote absentee a request must be made by the Friday prior to the election. The ballot must then be returned and received by elections officials by noon on election day.[5]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Delaware is one of eight states that allows early voting but requires an excuse to vote early. Early voting is offered in the form of absentee in-person voting and is available as soon as absentee ballots are made available up until noon on election day.[6]

To vote early you need to provide an excuse for why you will be unable to vote at the polls during normal voting hours. The following are valid reasons:[6]

  • The nature of your work or schooling prevents you from going to your polling place.
  • Your service to the United States or to the State of Delaware prevents you from going to your polling place. Spouses or dependents of the person in service also qualify. (Public service includes military, diplomatic, etc.)
  • The tenets or teaching of your religion prevent you from going to your polling place on election day.
  • You are on vacation on election day.
  • You are sick.
  • You are permanently or temporarily disabled.
  • You are incarcerated (non-felony).

See also

References