Denver, Colorado

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Denver, Colorado
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General information
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock - 2012-08-15 (portrait crop).jpg
Mayor:Michael B. Hancock
Mayor party:Nonpartisan
Last mayoral election:2011
Next mayoral election:2015
Last city council election:2013
Next city council election:2015
City council seats:13
2013 FY Budget:$1.49 billion
City website
Composition data
Population in 2013:649,495
Gender:50.0% Female
Race:White 68.9%
African American 10.2%
Hispanic or Latino 31.8%
Asian 3.4%
American Indian and Alaska Native alone 1.4%
Two or More 4.1%
Unemployment:5.5%
Median household income:$49,091
High school graduation rate:85.1%
College graduation rate:42.2%
Related Denver offices
Colorado Congressional Delegation
Colorado State Legislature
Colorado state executive offices
Denver is the capital city of Colorado, and the most populous city in the state. Its government is consolidated with the government of Denver County. As of 2013, its population was 649,495.[1]

City government

The city of Denver utilizes a "strong mayor" and city council system. In this form of municipal government, the city council serves as the city's primary legislative body and the mayor serves as the city's chief executive.

Mayor

The mayor serves as the city's chief executive, and is responsible for proposing a budget, signing legislation into law, appointing departmental directors and overseeing the city's day-to-day operations.[2] Michael B. Hancock is the current Mayor of Denver.[3]

City council

The Denver City Council is the city's primary legislative body. It is responsible for adopting the city budget, approving mayoral appointees, levying taxes and making or amending city laws, policies and ordinances.[4]

Membership

Denver's city council has thirteen members. Eleven are elected by the city's eleven districts, while two are elected at-large.[5]

Council committees

The Denver City Council features six standing committees, which focus on individual policy and legislative issues. Generally, the drafting of city legislation begins with the committees.[6]

For a list of Denver's committees and committee members, see here.

Elections

2015

See also: Denver, Colorado municipal elections, 2015

The city of Denver, Colorado will hold elections for mayor and city council in 2015. Information on election dates will be posted once they are made available. All 13 city council seats are up for election.

Budget

Denver's adopted operating budget for fiscal year 2013 was $1.49 billion.[7]

Contact information

Office of the Mayor
1437 N Bannock St Rm 350
Denver, CO
Phone: (720) 865-9000

City Council
City and County Building
1437 Bannock St., Rm. 451
Denver, CO 80202
Phone: (720) 337-2000
dencc@denvergov.org

To contact individual council members, see here.

Ballot measures

See also: Denver County, Colorado ballot measures

The city of Denver is in Denver County. A list of ballot measures in Denver County is available here.

Initiative process

See also: Laws governing local ballot measures in Colorado

Population as of the July 2011 census update: 619,968.[8] Denver is a charter consolidated city-county.

The signature requirement is 5% of the total vote for the office of Mayor in the last election at which a Mayor was elected. 5 registered electors of the City and County of Denver may begin the proceedings for initiative by filing with the Clerk and Recorder an affidavit constituting themselves as a petitioners' committee. The required affidavit and petition content is in Denver Charter, Sec. 8.3.2. Petitioners must also submit the proposed text to the city council staff and the city attorney for review and comments. Circulators shall be a qualified electors of Colorado. A completed initiative petition must be filed with the Clerk and Recorder no later than 180 days from the date of approval of the affidavit, ballot title, and petition form. Unless the City Council calls an earlier special municipal election, the Clerk and Recorder shall submit the initiative or referendum to the ballot at the next scheduled citywide election held not less than 60 days after the determination of sufficiency.

DocumentIcon.jpg Denver Charter, Article VIII, Part 3

Lobbying

In 2013, Denver spent a total of $200,000 on federal lobbying. The issues for which the city filed, as well as the number of reports, can be seen below.[9]

Federal Lobbying Issues, 2013
Reports Issue
4 Fed Budget & Appropriations
4 Education
4 Environment and Superfund
4 Health Issues
4 Housing
4 Immigration
4 Law Enforcement and Crime
4 Transportation
4 Trade
4 Urban Development
4 Welfare
4 Agriculture
4 Aviation, Airlines and Airports
1 Banking

Website evaluation

See also: Evaluation of Colorado city websites
Grade2.pngB
Budget Y
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Meetings Y
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Elected Officials Y
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Administrative Officials Y
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Permits, zoning Y
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Audits Y
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Contracts Y
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Lobbying N
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Public Records P
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Local Taxes Y
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Transparency grading process

The good

  • Building permits are available on the website.[10]and zoning information.[11]
  • Agendas and minutes are available for City Council Meetings.[12]
  • City of Denver's bids and RFPs are posted.[13]
  • Budgets are posted.[14]
  • Extenstive Information on audits are available.[15]
  • The Mayor and city council officials contact information are posted online.[16]
  • Provides extensive information on local taxes.[17]

The bad

  • There is no information on the access of government records to the public. However, the name of the information officer and public records request forms are listed.[18]
  • Lobbying information and ethics is not noted

See also

External links

References