Denver Public Schools elections (2013)

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2013 Denver Public Schools Elections

General Election date:
November 5, 2013
Table of Contents
About the district
Method of election
Elections
What was at stake?
Key deadlines
Additional measures
External links
References
See also
Colorado
Denver Public Schools, Colorado
Denver County, Colorado ballot measures
Colorado ballot measures
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Four seats were up for election on the Denver Board of Education in Colorado. An at-large seat as well as seats in Districts 2, 3 and 4 were on the ballot on November 5, 2013. Barbara O'Brien defeated Michael Kiley and Joan Poston to win the at-large seat. Rosemary Rodriguez defeated Rosario C. de Baca to win the District 2 seat, Mike Johnson overcame Meg Schomp for the District 3 seat and Landri Taylor won the District 4 race against Roger Kilgore.

The 2013 election developed into a referendum on the reforms set in motion by Superintendent Tom Boasberg since his appointment in 2009. Boasberg has increased the district's emphasis on charter schools and closed poor-performing facilities. Opponents of Boasberg's reforms cite a persistent achievement gap between affluent and low-income student populations.[1]

The Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) endorsed at-large candidate Michael Kiley, District 2 candidate Rosario C. de Baca, District 3 candidate Meg Schomp and Roger Kilgore in District 4. These candidates want to slow down or halt development of charter schools in the district. Democrats for Education Reform, a non-profit organization supporting Boasberg's reforms, has endorsed at-large candidate Barbara O'Brien, District 2 candidate Rosemary Rodriguez, Mike Johnson in District 3 and District 4 incumbent Landri Taylor.[2] The latter slate of candidates won significant victories against their opponents on November 5, 2013.

About the district

See also: Denver Public Schools, Colorado
Denver Public Schools is located in Denver County, CO
Denver Public Schools serves students in Denver, the county seat of Denver County, Colorado. According to the 2010 US Census, Denver is home to 600,158 residents.[3]

Demographics

Denver outperformed the rest of Colorado in higher education achievement while lagging behind state rates for median income and poverty in 2010. The average household income in Denver was $47,499 compared to $57,685 for the state of Colorado. The poverty rate in Denver was 18.8% compared to 12.5% for the entire state. The U.S. Census also found that 41.3% of Denver residents aged 25 years and older earned a bachelor's degree compared to 36.3% in Colorado.[3]

Racial Demographics, 2010[3]
Race Denver (%) Colorado (%)
White 68.9 81.3
Black or African American 10.2 4
American Indian and Alaska Native 1.4 1.1
Asian 3.4 2.8
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0.1 0.1
Two or More Races 4.1 3.4
Hispanic or Latino 31.8 20.7

Party Affiliation, 2013[4]
Party Registered Voters  % of Total
Democratic 164,196 50.5
Unaffiliated 103,119 31.7
Republican 53,385 16.4
Libertarian 2,880 0.9
Green 1,187 0.4
American Constitution 630 0.2

Note: The United States Census Bureau considers "Hispanic or Latino" to be a place of origin, not a race. Therefore, the Census allows citizens to report both their race and that they are from a "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin simultaneously. As a result, the percentages in each column of the racial demographics table will exceed 100 percent. Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" place of origin percentages, although rounding by the Census Bureau may make the total one or two tenths off from being exactly 100 percent.[5]

Method of board member selection

Denver Public Schools District Map.jpg

The Denver Board of Education consists of seven members who are elected to four-year terms. Two members represent the entire district while five members are elected by district. There was no primary election and the general election took place on November 5, 2013. The November 3, 2015 ballot will feature one at-large seat and seats in Districts 1 and 5.

Candidates for the Denver Board of Education had to file nominating petitions containing at least 50 valid signatures with the Denver County Clerk by August 30, 2013 to qualify for the ballot. State law requires candidates to submit disclosures of contributions and expenditures to comply with the Fair Campaign Practices Act on October 15, November 1 and December 5.[6]

Voters in Denver were able to request mail ballots from the Denver County Elections Department by October 15. These ballots were sent out starting on October 15 to registered voters who submitted requests by the deadline. Mailed ballots could be dropped off at 16 approved locations throughout Denver by 7:00pm local time on November 5. Voters could also mail their ballots back to the County Clerk though ballots needed to arrive by November 5.[7]

Elections

2013

Candidates

[edit]

  • Mike Johnson
    • Graduate, Georgetown University
    • Legal counsel, Building Excellent Schools Today
  • Meg Schomp
    • Graduate, University of Colorado and University of Denver
    • Former social worker and non-profit director

  • Landri Taylor
    • Incumbent
    • Graduate, University of California-Berkeley
    • President, Urban League of Metropolitan Denver
  • Roger Kilgore
    • Small business owner

Election results

Denver Public Schools, Four-year term, At-large, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngBarbara O'Brien 59.3% 63,554
     Nonpartisan Michael Kiley 31.2% 33,440
     Nonpartisan Joan Poston 9.4% 10,112
Total Votes 107,106
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "Final Official Election Results," accessed December 13, 2013


Denver Public Schools, Four-year term, District 2, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngRosemary Rodriguez 61.8% 9,305
     Nonpartisan Rosario C. de Baca 38.2% 5,743
Total Votes 15,048
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "Final Official Election Results," accessed December 13, 2013


Denver Public Schools, Four-year term, District 3, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngMike Johnson 57.1% 16,111
     Nonpartisan Meg Schomp 42.9% 12,122
Total Votes 28,233
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "Final Official Election Results," accessed December 13, 2013


Denver Public Schools, Four-year term, District 4, 2013
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngLandri Taylor Incumbent 65.5% 16,380
     Nonpartisan Roger Kilgore 34.5% 8,616
Total Votes 24,996
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "Final Official Election Results," accessed December 13, 2013

Forums

EdNews Colorado, A+ Denver and KDVR Fox 31 sponsored a series of candidate debates prior to the November 5 election.

At-large

Barbara O'Brien, Michael Kiley and Joan Poston participated in a debate on September 26, 2013. O'Brien stated her opposition to the expansion of voucher programs in part because the district had already adopted school choice policies. Kiley argued that greater engagement by the local community was necessary to improve academic performance. Poston suggested that the culture of the school board had to change before further reforms could take place.[8]

District 2

Rosario C. de Baca and Rosemary Rodriguez participated in a debate on October 2, 2013. The debate included disagreements over the district's closure of schools and transportation costs associated with school choice. de Baca opposed the district's approach to shuttering schools as disruptive to students who must relocate to other facilities. Rodriguez suggested that the district needs to close facilities if resources could be better allocated to existing facilities or charter schools. de Baca wanted the district to focus on allocating students closer to their homes in order to reduce transportation costs. Rodriguez supported transportation programs throughout the district if students were dissatisfied with their neighborhood schools.[9]

District 3

Mike Johnson and Meg Schomp participated in a debate on September 18, 2013. Both candidates disagreed about the district's approach to school choice and teacher evaluations. Johnson said that every public schools should have greater autonomy from the district administration, replicating the success of charter schools. Schomp argued that the focus should be on improving existing schools rather than shifting significant resources to alternative schools. Johnson supported the state's new evaluation system for teachers while Schomp was concerned about the importance of standardized test scores in the assessment of teacher performance.[10]

District 4

Landri Taylor and Roger Kilgore participated in a debate on October 9, 2013. The candidates discussed their views on changes to state teacher evaluations and school choice. Taylor argued that the new evaluation system was created in consultation with teachers and staff members at Denver Public Schools. Kilgore expressed concern that the new evaluation system could be problematic if the evaluators are not qualified to assess educational standards. The debate contrasted Taylor's support for school choice to improve academic performance with Kilgore's critique of school choice as a sign of administrative problems.[11]

Endorsements

The Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) and the Network for Public Education (NPE) endorsed at-large candidate Michael Kiley, District 2 candidate Rosario C. de Baca, District 3 candidate Meg Schomp and Roger Kilgore in District 4.[12] Democrats for Education Reform, a non-profit organization supporting Boasberg's reforms, endorsed at-large candidate Barbara O'Brien, District 2 candidate Rosemary Rodriguez, Mike Johnson in District 3 and District 4 incumbent Landri Taylor.[13]

Campaign finance

Candidates received a total of $821,425.11 and spent a total of $776,962.43 during the election, according to the Colorado Secretary of State.[14]

In the at-large race, candidates received a total of $245,760.90 and spent a total of $235,755.85.

Candidate Contributions Expenditures Cash on hand
Michael Kiley $47,151.90 $38,331.85 $8,820.05
Barbara O'Brien $198,609.00 $197,112.27 $1,496.73
Joan Poston $0.00 $311.73 -$311.73

In the District 1 race, candidates received a total of $148,120 and spent a total of $128,736.44.

Candidate Contributions Expenditures Cash on hand
Rosario C. de Baca $23,335.00 $13,110.40 $10,224.60
Rosemary Rodriguez $124,785.00 $115,626.04 $9,158.96

In the District 2 race, candidates received a total of $247,493.93 and spent a total of $234,519.54.

Candidate Contributions Expenditures Cash on hand
Mike Johnson $193,554.13 $184,118.89 $9,365.24
Meg Schomp $53,939.80 $50,330.65 $3,609.15

In the District 4 race, candidates received a total of $180,050.28 and spent a total of $177,950.61.

Candidate Contributions Expenditures Cash on hand
Roger Kilgore $46,559.26 $46,800.04 -$240.78
Landri Taylor $133,491.02 $131,150.57 $2,340.45

Past elections

2011

Denver Board of Education, At-large, November 1, 2011
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngAllegra "Happy" Haynes 59.2% 53,891
     Nonpartisan Roger Kilgore 11.4% 10,374
     Nonpartisan Jacqueline Carole Shumway 10.8% 9,871
     Nonpartisan Frank E. Deserino 9.8% 8,937
     Nonpartisan John Daniel 8.7% 7,925
Total Votes 90,998
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder


Denver Board of Education, District 1, November 1, 2011
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngAnne Rowe 65.2% 15,249
     Nonpartisan Emily Sirota 34.8% 8,142
Total Votes 23,391
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder


Denver Board of Education, District 5, November 1, 2011
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngArturo Jimenez 50.5% 7,874
     Nonpartisan Jennifer Draper Carson 49.5% 7,732
Total Votes 15,606
Source: Denver County Clerk and Recorder

What was at stake?

Incumbents Mary Seawell, Andrea Merida and Jeannie Kaplan did seek re-election to the at-large, District 2 and District 3 seats, respectively. A three-way race for the at-large seat featured former Lieutenant Governor Barbara O'Brien, Michael Kiley and Joan Poston. The District 2 race featured newcomers Rosario C. de Baca and Rosemary Rodriguez. Mike Johnson and Meg Schomp competed to replace Kaplan in District 3. Landri Taylor ran for re-election in District 4 against challenger Roger Kilgore.

Stances on Amendment 66

Colorado residents voted on Amendment 66, a proposed constitutional amendment to raise income taxes to support public education. The following table lists the publicly stated position of each Board of Education candidate on the amendment.

Stances on Amendment 66[15]
Candidate Stated position
Barbara O'Brien Support
Michael Kiley Support
Joan Poston Oppose
Rosario C. de Baca Support
Rosemary Rodriguez Support
Mike Johnson Support
Meg Schomp Support
Landri Taylor Support
Roger Kilgore Support

Conflict of interest concerns

Candidates for the at-large, District 3 and District 4 seats accused their opponents of conflicts of interest. At-large candidate Michael Kiley pointed out that the district has a $350,000 contract with Get Smart Schools, a non-profit organization headed by Barbara O'Brien. O'Brien countered that Kiley's employer, Kronos, provides software to the district. District 3 candidate Meg Schomp believed opponent Mike Johnson could not meet the board's ethical standards due to his work as a school finance consultant. Johnson pointed out that Schomp's husband is an attorney who has represented the district in past legal actions.[16]

District 4 candidate Roger Kilgore asked his opponent, incumbent Landri Taylor, to resign due to a conflict-of-interest allegation. Kilgore noted that Taylor is the CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan Denver, which has a $142,962 contract with the district for after-school programs. Taylor criticized Kilgore's request and argued that the agreement occurred after Taylor was a board member. He also suggested that he would recuse himself if the board voted on issues related to agreements with the Urban League.[17]

Key deadlines

The following dates were key deadlines for the Denver Board of Education election in 2013:[18]

Deadline Event
August 7, 2013 Last day for nominating petitions to be made available to candidates.
August 30, 2013 Last day to file nominating petitions.
September 3, 2013 Last day to file as a write-in candidate.
October 15, 2013 Candidates must file first Fair Campaign Practices Act report detailing their contributions and expenditures.
October 15, 2013 First day ballots are mailed to registered voters in Denver County.
November 1, 2013 Candidates must file second Fair Campaign Practices Act report detailing their contributions and expenditures.
November 5, 2013 General election and last day for voters to submit mailed ballots at ballot drop-off locations.
November 22, 2013 Certification of general election votes.
December 5, 2013 Candidates must file third Fair Campaign Practices Act report detailing their contributions and expenditures.

Additional elections on the ballot

The Denver Board of Education shared the ballot with four city and county questions including three proposed changes to the county charter.[19] Voters throughout Colorado decided on Colorado Proposition AA, which proposed a 10% sales tax and a 15% excise tax on marijuana sold for recreational use. The ballot included Amendment 66, a constitutional amendment that proposed increasing income taxes to 5% for incomes up to $75,000 and 5.9% for incomes over $75,000 in order to support public education.

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Denver + Public + Schools + Colorado"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Denver Public Schools News Feed

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See also

External links

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References

  1. Denver Post, "Tom Boasberg, Denver school leader, has a lot riding on board election results," August 30, 2013
  2. EdNews Colorado, "DPS board endorsements mount up," September 16, 2013
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 U.S. Census, "Quick Facts: Denver, accessed October 29, 2013
  4. Colorado Secretary of State, “Voter Registration Numbers,” Accessed October 29, 2013
  5. United States Census Bureau, "Frequently Asked Questions," accessed April 21, 2014
  6. Colorado Secretary of State, "Fair Campaign Practices Act," accessed October 23, 2013
  7. Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "Voter Information for 2013 Coordinated Election," accessed October 29, 2013
  8. EdNews Colorado, "O’Brien, Kiley and Poston argue conflict of interest, Amendment 66," September 26, 2013
  9. EdNews Colorado, "District 2 board candidates clash over evaluations, school closures," October 2, 2013
  10. EdNews Colorado, "Schomp, Johnson emphasize differences over mill levy, school choice," September 18, 2013
  11. EdNews Colorado, "Denver Public Schools District 4 board candidates spar over Montbello," October 9, 2013
  12. Network for Public Education, "NPE Endorses Four Candidates for Denver Board of Education," October 14, 2013
  13. EdNews Colorado, "DPS board endorsements mount up," September 16, 2013
  14. Colorado TRACER, "Candidate and Candidate Committee Detail," accessed December 20, 2013
  15. EdNews Colorado, "DPS Election 2013," accessed October 29, 2013
  16. The Colorado Independent, "Denver school board election accusations spotlight tangled web of relationships," October 29, 2013
  17. Denver Post, "Denver school board candidate Kilgore calls on Taylor to resign," October 24, 2013
  18. Colorado Secretary of State, "2013 Election Calendar," accessed July 8, 2013
  19. Denver County Clerk and Recorder, "2013 Sample Ballot," accessed October 29, 2013