Election results, 2014

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2014 Elections:
What's At Stake?

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United States SenateUnited States HouseTrifectas and state government control
State legislaturesState executivesBallot measuresState courtsSchool boards
Municipal elections

Links to all election results, 2014
The 2014 general election resulted in sweeping gains for Republicans at the federal and state levels, up and down the ballot. Republicans took control of the U.S. Senate while broadening their existing majority in the U.S. House. There will be more Republican governors than at any point in the past 20 years while 11 legislative chambers flipped for Republicans. Republicans now have more than three times as many trifectas as Democrats. Statewide and local ballot measure results were mixed, with both liberal and conservative sides experiencing successes and failures on a variety of issues.

For a complete directory of the comprehensive coverage that Ballotpedia and Judgepedia offer, visit this page.

What were the big questions?

United States Senate

See also: U.S. Senate elections, 2014
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2014 Elections:
What's at Stake?

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Who ended up with majority control of the U.S. Senate?

All eyes were on which party would control the U.S. Senate in 2015. The Democratic-controlled Senate in the 113th Congress had a partisan breakdown of 53-45-2, with the two Independents caucusing with the Democrats. For Republicans to take the majority in the Senate, they needed to take at least six of the 36 seats up for election that were held by Democrats, and retain control of the 15 seats held by Republicans. The section updated the seat count for each party throughout the night and the vote totals in the hotly contested races.

Rep. Bill Cassidy (R) won the Louisiana seat in a runoff election on December 6, 2014.

U.S. Senate
Dem. 44
Rep. 54
Ind. 2
TOTAL 100
UNDECIDED 0
Click here for more details.
State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party Seat Party Change?
Alaska Senate Mark Begich Democratic Party Dan Sullivan Republican Party Yes
Arkansas Senate Mark Pryor Democratic Party Tom Cotton Republican Party Yes
Colorado Senate Mark Udall Democratic Party Cory Gardner Republican Party Yes
Georgia Senate Saxby Chambliss* Republican Party David Perdue Republican Party No
Iowa Senate Tom Harkin* Democratic Party Joni Ernst Republican Party Yes
Kansas Senate Pat Roberts Republican Party Pat Roberts Republican Party No
Kentucky Senate Mitch McConnell Republican Party Mitch McConnell Republican Party No
Louisiana Senate Mary Landrieu Democratic Party Bill Cassidy Republican Party Yes
Montana Senate John Walsh* Democratic Party Steve Daines Republican Party Yes
New Hampshire Senate Jeanne Shaheen Democratic Party Jeanne Shaheen Democratic Party No
North Carolina Senate Kay Hagan Democratic Party Thom Tillis Republican Party Yes
South Dakota Senate Tim Johnson* Democratic Party Mike Rounds Republican Party Yes
Virginia Senate Mark Warner Democratic Party Mark Warner Democratic Party No
West Virginia Senate Jay Rockefeller* Democratic Party Shelley Moore Capito Republican Party Yes

"*" indicates that the incumbent retired in 2014.

U.S. Senate, Alabama General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeff Sessions Incumbent 97.3% 795,606
     N/A Write-in 2.7% 22,484
Total Votes 818,090
Source: Alabama Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Alaska General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDan Sullivan 48% 135,445
     Democratic Mark Begich Incumbent 45.8% 129,431
     Libertarian Mark Fish 3.7% 10,512
     Independent Ted Gianoutsos 2% 5,636
     N/A Write-in 0.5% 1,376
Total Votes 282,400
Source: Alaska Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Arkansas General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Cotton 56.5% 478,819
     Democratic Mark Pryor Incumbent 39.5% 334,174
     Libertarian Nathan LaFrance 2% 17,210
     Green Mark Swaney 2% 16,797
Total Votes 847,000
Source: Arkansas Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Colorado General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngCory Gardner 48.2% 983,891
     Democratic Mark Udall Incumbent 46.3% 944,203
     Libertarian Gaylon Kent 2.6% 52,876
     Independent Steve Shogan 1.4% 29,472
     Independent Raul Acosta 1.2% 24,151
     Unity Party of Colorado Bill Hammons 0.3% 6,427
Total Votes 2,041,020
Source: Colorado Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Delaware General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngChris Coons Incumbent 55.8% 130,655
     Republican Kevin Wade 42.2% 98,823
     Green Andrew Groff 1.9% 4,560
Total Votes 234,038
Source: Delaware Department of Elections




U.S. Senate, Georgia General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDavid Perdue 52.89% 1,358,088
     Democratic Michelle Nunn 45.21% 1,160,811
     Libertarian Amanda Swafford 1.90% 48,862
Total Votes 2,567,761
Source: Georgia Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Idaho General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJim Risch Incumbent 65.3% 285,596
     Democratic Nels Mitchell 34.7% 151,574
Total Votes 437,170
Source: Idaho Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Illinois General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Durbin Incumbent 53.5% 1,929,637
     Republican Jim Oberweis 42.7% 1,538,522
     Libertarian Sharon Hansen 3.8% 135,316
Total Votes 3,603,475
Source: Illinois Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Iowa General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJoni Ernst 52.1% 588,575
     Democratic Bruce Braley 43.8% 494,370
     Libertarian Douglas Butzier 2.4% 26,815
     Independent Rick Stewart 0.7% 8,232
     Independent Ruth Smith 0.5% 5,873
     Independent Bob Quast 0.4% 4,724
     Write-in Other 0.1% 1,111
Total Votes 1,129,700
Source: Iowa Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Kansas General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPat Roberts Incumbent 53.1% 460,350
     Independent Greg Orman 42.5% 368,372
     Libertarian Randall Batson 4.3% 37,469
Total Votes 866,191
Source: Kentucky Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Kentucky General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMitch McConnell Incumbent 56.2% 806,787
     Democratic Alison Lundergan Grimes 40.7% 584,698
     Libertarian David Patterson 3.1% 44,240
Total Votes 1,435,725
Source: Kentucky Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Louisiana General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMary Landrieu Incumbent 42.1% 619,402
     Democratic Wayne Ables 0.8% 11,323
     Democratic Vallian Senegal 0.3% 3,831
     Democratic William Waymire Jr. 0.3% 4,673
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngBill Cassidy 41% 603,084
     Republican Rob Maness 13.8% 202,556
     Republican Thomas Clements 1% 14,173
     Libertarian Brannon Lee McMorris 0.9% 13,034
Total Votes 1,472,076
Source: Mary Landrieu and Bill Cassidy headed to a runoff election on December 6, 2014. Louisiana Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Maine General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSusan Collins Incumbent 67% 413,505
     Democratic Shenna Bellows 30.8% 190,254
     Other Other 0% 269
     Blank None 2.1% 12,968
Total Votes 616,996
Source: Maine Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Massachusetts General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngEd Markey Incumbent 59% 1,289,944
     Republican Brian Herr 36.2% 791,950
     Write-in Other 0.1% 3,078
     Blank None 4.7% 101,819
Total Votes 2,186,791
Source: Massachusetts Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Michigan General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGary Peters 54.6% 1,704,936
     Republican Terri Lynn Land 41.3% 1,290,199
     Libertarian Jim Fulner 2% 62,897
     Green Richard Matkin 0.8% 26,137
     U.S. Taxpayers Party Chris Wahmhoff 1.2% 37,529
Total Votes 3,121,698
Source: Michigan Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Minnesota General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Franken Incumbent 53.2% 1,053,205
     Republican Mike McFadden 42.9% 850,227
     Libertarian Heather Johnson 1.5% 29,685
     Independence Steve Carlson 2.4% 47,530
     N/A Write-in 0% 881
Total Votes 1,981,528
Source: Minnesota Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Mississippi General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngThad Cochran Incumbent 59.9% 378,481
     Democratic Travis Childers 37.9% 239,439
     Reform Shawn O'Hara 2.2% 13,938
Total Votes 631,858
Source: Mississippi Secretary of State Official Results




U.S. Senate, Montana General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSteve Daines 57.8% 213,709
     Democratic Amanda Curtis 40.1% 148,184
     Libertarian Roger Roots 2.1% 7,933
Total Votes 369,826
Source: Montana Secretary of State



U.S. Senate, Nebraska General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngBen Sasse 64.4% 347,636
     Democrat Dave Domina 31.5% 170,127
     Independent Jim Jenkins 2.9% 15,868
     Independent Todd Watson 1.2% 6,260
Total Votes 539,891
Source: Nebraska Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, New Hampshire General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJeanne Shaheen Incumbent 51.5% 251,184
     Republican Scott Brown 48.2% 235,347
     N/A Scatter 0.3% 1,628
Total Votes 488,159
Source: New Hampshire Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, New Jersey General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngCory Booker Incumbent 55.8% 1,043,866
     Republican Jeff Bell 42.3% 791,297
     Libertarian Joe Baratelli 0.9% 16,721
     Independent Jeff Boss 0.2% 4,513
     Independent Antonio Sabas 0.2% 3,544
     Democratic-Republican Eugene Lavergne 0.2% 3,890
     Economic Growth Hank Schroeder 0.3% 5,704
Total Votes 1,869,535
Source: New Jersey Division of Elections




U.S. Senate, New Mexico General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTom Udall Incumbent 55.6% 286,409
     Republican Allen Weh 44.4% 229,097
Total Votes 515,506
Source: New Mexico Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, North Carolina General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Kay Hagan Incumbent 47.3% 1,377,651
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngThom Tillis 48.8% 1,423,259
     Libertarian Sean Haugh 3.7% 109,100
     Write-in John Rhodes 0% 621
     Write-in David Waddell 0% 201
     Write-in Barry Gurney 0% 142
     Write-in Write-in (miscellaneous) 0.1% 4,307
Total Votes 2,915,281
Source: North Carolina State Board of Elections




U.S. Senate, Oklahoma General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJim Inhofe Incumbent 68% 558,166
     Democratic Matt Silverstein 28.5% 234,307
     Independent Ray Woods 1.2% 9,913
     Independent Aaron DeLozier 0.9% 7,793
     Independent Joan Farr 1.3% 10,554
Total Votes 820,733
Source: Oklahoma State Election Board




U.S. Senate, Oregon General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJeff Merkley Incumbent 55.7% 814,537
     Republican Monica Wehby 36.9% 538,847
     Libertarian Mike Montchalin 3.1% 44,916
     Constitution James Leuenberger 1.7% 24,212
     Green Christina Jean Lugo 2.2% 32,434
     Miscellaneous Miscellaneous 0.5% 6,672
Total Votes 1,461,618
Source: Oregon Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Rhode Island General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJack Reed Incumbent 70.6% 223,675
     Republican Mark Zaccaria 29.2% 92,684
     N/A Write-in 0.2% 539
Total Votes 316,898
Source: Rhode Island Board of Elections




U.S. Senate, South Carolina General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLindsey Graham Incumbent 55.3% 672,941
     Democratic Brad Hutto 37.6% 456,726
     Libertarian Victor Kocher 2.8% 33,839
     Independent Thomas Ravenel 3.9% 47,588
     N/A Write-in 0.4% 4,774
Total Votes 1,215,868
Source: South Carolina State Election Commission




U.S. Senate, South Dakota General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMike Rounds 50.4% 140,741
     Democratic Rick Weiland 29.5% 82,456
     Independent Larry Pressler 17.1% 47,741
     Independent Gordon Howie 3% 8,474
Total Votes 279,412
Source: South Dakota Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Tennessee General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLamar Alexander Incumbent 61.9% 849,629
     Democratic Gordon Ball 31.8% 437,251
     Independent Ed Gauthier 0.2% 2,311
     Independent Bartholomew Phillips 0.2% 2,380
     Independent C. Salekin 0.1% 784
     Independent Danny Page 0.6% 7,710
     Independent Eric Schechter 0.1% 1,668
     Constitution Joe Wilmoth 2.6% 36,063
     Independent Joshua James 0.4% 5,672
     Independent Rick Tyler 0.4% 5,753
     Tea Party Tom Emerson, Jr. 0.8% 11,149
     Green Martin Pleasant 0.9% 12,536
Total Votes 1,372,906
Source: Tennessee Secretary of State Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.




U.S. Senate, Texas General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Cornyn Incumbent 61.6% 2,860,678
     Democratic David Alameel 34.4% 1,597,272
     Libertarian Rebecca Paddock 2.9% 133,738
     Green Emily Marie Sanchez 1.2% 54,695
     Write-in Mohammed Tahiro 0% 988
Total Votes 4,647,371
Source: Texas Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Virginia General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMark Warner Incumbent 49.1% 1,073,667
     Republican Ed Gillespie 48.3% 1,055,940
     Libertarian Robert Sarvis 2.4% 53,102
     N/A write-in 0.1% 1,764
Total Votes 2,184,473
Source: Virginia Department of Elections




U.S. Senate, West Virginia General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngShelley Moore Capito 62.1% 280,400
     Democratic Natalie Tennant 34.5% 155,730
     Libertarian John Buckley 1.6% 7,344
     Constitution Phil Hudok 0.6% 2,543
     Mountain Bob Henry Baber 1.2% 5,481
Total Votes 451,498
Source: West Virginia Secretary of State




U.S. Senate, Wyoming General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMike Enzi Incumbent 72.2% 121,554
     Democratic Charlie Hardy 17.4% 29,377
     Independent Curt Gottshall 7.9% 13,311
     Libertarian Joe Porambo 2.2% 3,677
     N/A Write-in 0.3% 471
Total Votes 168,390
Source: Wyoming Secretary of State





United States House

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Did the Democratic Party reduce the Republican U.S. House majority?

All 435 U.S. House of Representatives seats were up for election. Republicans went into the election with a 233-199 majority (with three vacancies). Democrats failed to pick up 19 seats to flip control and instead lost seats. On this page, Ballotpedia tracked the districts identified as battleground districts. Below the battleground chart, we also tracked unexpectedly close races that developed throughout election night.

Note: The tables below were updated in real-time on election night. As races were called, we updated the partisan count totals.

U.S. House
Dem. 188
Rep. 247
Ind. 0
TOTAL 435
Click here for more details.
State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party District Party Change?
Arizona's 1st District Ann Kirkpatrick Democratic Party Ann Kirkpatrick Democratic Party No
Arizona's 2nd District Ron Barber Democratic Party Martha McSally Republican Party Yes
Arizona's 9th District Kyrsten Sinema Democratic Party Kyrsten Sinema Democratic Party No
California's 7th District Ami Bera Democratic Party Ami Bera Democratic Party No
California's 21st District David Valadao Republican Party David Valadao Republican Party No
California's 36th District Raul Ruiz Democratic Party Raul Ruiz Democratic Party No
California's 52nd District Scott Peters Democratic Party Scott Peters Democratic Party No
Colorado's 6th District Mike Coffman Republican Party Mike Coffman Republican Party No
Florida's 18th District Patrick Murphy Democratic Party Patrick Murphy Democratic Party No
Florida's 26th District Joe Garcia Democratic Party Carlos Curbelo Republican Party Yes
Illinois' 12th District William Enyart Democratic Party Mike Bost Republican Party Yes
Illinois' 13th District Rodney Davis Republican Party Rodney Davis Republican Party No
Michigan's 1st District Dan Benishek Republican Party Dan Benishek Republican Party No
Minnesota's 8th District Rick Nolan Democratic Party Rick Nolan Democratic Party No
Nevada's 3rd District Joe Heck Republican Party Joe Heck Republican Party No
New Hampshire's 1st District Carol Shea-Porter Democratic Party Frank Guinta Republican Party Yes
New Jersey's 2nd District Frank LoBiondo Republican Party Frank LoBiondo Republican Party No
New Jersey's 3rd District Jon Runyan* Republican Party Tom MacArthur Republican Party No
New York's 1st District Tim Bishop Democratic Party Lee Zeldin Republican Party Yes
New York's 11th District Michael Grimm Republican Party Michael Grimm Republican Party No
New York's 18th District Sean Maloney Democratic Party Sean Maloney Democratic Party No
New York's 21st District Bill Owens* Democratic Party Elise Stefanik Republican Party Yes
New York's 23rd District Tom Reed Republican Party Tom Reed Republican Party No
Texas' 23rd District Pete Gallego Democratic Party Will Hurd Republican Party Yes
Virginia's 2nd District Scott Rigell Republican Party Scott Rigell Republican Party No
West Virginia's 3rd District Nick Rahall Democratic Party Evan Jenkins Republican Party Yes

"*" indicates that the incumbent retired in 2014.

Upsets

Non-battleground district upsets and partisan changes included:

District Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party
California's 31st District Gary Miller (Retired) Republican Party Pete Aguilar Democratic Party
Florida's 2nd District Steve Southerland Republican Party Gwen Graham Democratic Party
Georgia's 12th District John Barrow Democratic Party Rick Allen Republican Party
Illinois' 10th District Brad Schneider Democratic Party Robert J. Dold Republican Party
Iowa's 1st District Bruce Braley (Ran for Senate) Democratic Party Rod Blum Republican Party
Maine's 2nd District Mike Michaud (Ran for governor) Democratic Party Bruce Poliquin Republican Party
Nebraska's 2nd District Lee Terry Republican Party Brad Ashford Democratic Party
Nevada's 4th District Steven Horsford Democratic Party Cresent Hardy Republican Party
New York's 24th District Dan Maffei Democratic Party John Katko Republican Party

Expected seat changes

These are districts where a change in party was expected due to a very vulnerable incumbent. These races were not rated as battlegrounds because they were likely to flip control.

District Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party
North Carolina's 7th District Mike McIntyre (Retiring) Democratic Party David Rouzer Republican Party
Utah's 4th District Jim Matheson (Retiring) Democratic Party Mia Love Republican Party
West Virginia's 3rd District Nick Rahall Democratic Party Evan Jenkins Republican Party

Incumbents who lost

Partisanship of the losing incumbents:

  • Republican Party 3
  • Democratic Party 10
District Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party
Arizona's 2nd District Ron Barber Democratic Party Martha McSally Republican Party
Florida's 2nd District Steve Southerland Republican Party Gwen Graham Democratic Party
Florida's 26th District Joe Garcia Democratic Party Carlos Curbelo Republican Party
Georgia's 12th District John Barrow Democratic Party Rick Allen Republican Party
Illinois' 10th District Brad Schneider Democratic Party Robert Dold Republican Party
Illinois' 12th District Bill Enyart Democratic Party Mike Bost Republican Party
Louisiana's 5th District Vance McAllister Republican Party Ralph Abraham Republican Party
Nebraska's 2nd District Lee Terry Republican Party Brad Ashford Democratic Party
Nevada's 4th District Steven Horsford Democratic Party Cresent Hardy Republican Party
New Hampshire's 1st District Carol Shea-Porter Democratic Party Frank Guinta Republican Party
New York's 1st District Tim Bishop Democratic Party Lee Zeldin Republican Party
Texas' 23rd District Pete Gallego Democratic Party Will Hurd Republican Party
New York's 24th District Dan Maffei Democratic Party John Katko Republican Party
West Virginia's 3rd District Nick Rahall Democratic Party Evan Jenkins Republican Party

Trifectas and state government control

See also: Gubernatorial and legislative party control of state government
Trifecta visual breakdown heading into the 2014 election.

A trifecta is when one political party holds the governorship, a majority in the state senate and a majority in the state house. If a state doesn't have a trifecta, that means it has divided government.

State government trifectas are important because one-party control can lead to significant changes in public policy. Because of increasing levels of political polarization, trifectas are at an all-time high. Following this election, more than 80 percent of the country's state governments could have become trifectas. However, voters went in the other direction, electing more divided governments across the states, predominantly from previous Democratic trifectas losing single party control.

The following sections detail how the 2014 elections have changed the landscape of trifectas across the United States.

Who controls state governments?

Pre-election: Heading into election night, there were 36 trifectas.

Trifectas by state
Trifectas before and after November 2014
Before After Net change
Dem. 13 7 -6
Rep. 23 23 0
Divided 14 20 +6
TOTAL 50 50
Click here fore more details.

Following the 2014 election, Republicans had three times as many trifectas as Democrats. Eight trifectas became divided governments. Six of those were Democratic trifectas and two were Republican states (Alaska and Pennsylvania). Arkansas and Nevada both became Republican trifectas.

Possible new trifectas

  • Green check mark transparent.png Arkansas: For Arkansas to become a trifecta, both legislative chambers needed to stay Republican and the governor's office needed to swing Republican.
  • Green check mark transparent.png Nevada: For Nevada to become a trifecta, both legislative chambers needed to swing Republican and the governor's office needed to stay Republican.
  • Defeatedd Iowa: For Iowa to become a trifecta, the Iowa House of Representatives and the governor's office had to stay Republican and the Iowa State Senate had to swing Republican. The Democrats held a 26-24 majority in the state Senate with 25 seats up for election in 2014.
    • Verdict: No trifecta. The Democratic Party retained its State Senate majority.
  • Defeatedd New Hampshire: New Hampshire was considered a possible trifecta for both parties, as the voters of New Hampshire have a tendency to demonstrate fairly unpredictable voting patterns from election to election.
    • For New Hampshire to become a Democratic trifecta, the New Hampshire House of Representatives and the governor's office had to stay Democratic and the New Hampshire State Senate had to swing Democratic. The Republicans held a 12-11 majority in the state Senate with one vacancy and all 24 seats up for election in 2014.
    • For a Republican trifecta, the Republicans needed to flip the governorship and state house control while retaining the state Senate.
    • Verdict: No trifecta. Maggie Hassan won the governorship while the Republican Party retained the State Senate.
  • Defeatedd Washington: For Washington to become a trifecta, the Washington House of Representatives and governor's office had to stay Democratic and the Washington State Senate had to swing Democratic. There was no gubernatorial election in 2014, so trifecta status depended on the outcome of state Senate elections. Democrats officially held a 25-24 majority heading into the election; however, two Democratic members gave Republicans effective control over the Senate by joining the Majority Coalition Caucus following the 2012 election.

Possible trifecta losses

Ballotpedia identified 13[2] trifecta states that could have become divided governments.

  • Republican Party 6 Republican trifectas
  • Democratic Party 7 Democratic trifectas[2]

In those 13 battleground trifecta states, the breakdown is now:

  • Republican Party 5 Republican trifectas
  • Democratic Party 1 Democratic trifecta
  • Independent 7 divided governments

In the table below, a "Yes" indicates that party control was considered up for grabs while a "No" indicates races that were not deemed likely to change hands.

State Positions that could change hands Pre-election party in power Post-election party in power
Governor Senate House
Arizona Yes Yes No Republican Republican
Colorado No Yes No Democratic Divided government
Connecticut Yes No No Democratic Democratic
Florida Yes No No Republican Republican
Illinois Yes No No Democratic Divided government
Kansas Yes No No Republican Republican
Maryland Yes No No Democratic Divided government
Massachusetts Yes No No Democratic Divided government
Michigan Yes No Yes Republican Republican
Minnesota No No Yes Democratic Divided government
Pennsylvania Yes Yes Yes Republican Divided government
West Virginia No No Yes Democratic Divided government
Wisconsin Yes Yes No Republican Republican
Last updated: 4:12 pm February 12, 2015.

State legislatures

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How many state legislative chambers changed hands?

See also: State legislative elections, 2014 and State legislative battleground chambers, 2014

Heading into the 2014 elections, Republicans held a majority of state legislative chambers. Fifty-nine chambers, counting the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate, were under Republican control. (Although the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate technically had Democratic majorities, in both states a coalition arrangement between several break-away Democrats and the minority Republicans gave the Republicans effective control of those chambers.) Democrats held effective controlling majorities in 39 chambers: 18 state senates and 21 state houses. Although technically nonpartisan, the Nebraska State Senate was controlled by a Republican majority.[3]

The following table details partisan balance in all 99 chambers.

Partisan Balance of All 99 Chambers Before and After 2014 Elections
Pre-election Post-election
Legislative Chamber Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent
State senates 18 31* 0 1 14 35[4] 0 1
State houses 21 28 0 0 16 33 0 0
Total: 39 59* 0 1 30 68 0 1

*Note: Although Democrats had numerical majorities in both the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate, coalitions gave Republicans control of those chambers.

  • We covered 6,057 races in 46 states that held state legislative elections; for comprehensive coverage of all of those elections visit this page.
  • We identified 20 battleground chambers. Within those chambers, there were a handful of races that ultimately determined partisan control.
  • Specific districts were chosen based on local news reports as well as data on margin of victory in 2012 elections.
Legislatures
Dem. 30
Rep. 68
Ind/Tied 1
TOTAL 99
UNDECIDED 0
Click here for more details.

Chambers that flipped

A total of 11 chambers flipped to Republican control. Nine of them were previously held by Democrats, while Republicans gained an outright majority in two chambers where they previously ruled by coalition. The Republicans will control 68 chambers starting in January 2015. The following chambers flipped:

Republican Party Colorado State Senate
Republican Party Maine State Senate
Republican Party Minnesota State House
Republican Party Nevada State Senate
Republican Party Nevada State Assembly
Republican Party New Hampshire State House
Republican Party New Mexico State House
Republican Party New York State Senate
Republican Party Washington State Senate
Republican Party West Virginia State House
Republican Party West Virginia State Senate[5]

Battleground chambers

The 20 chambers in 17 states that made Ballotpedia's list were:

For more details and specifics with race-by-race tracking in state legislatures, visit this page, or click on one of the states below to navigate to that section.

State executives

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Ballotpedia covered elections for 225 state executive seats in 43 states. The following charts tracked results for hotly contested races for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and secretary of state. There are also sections devoted to specialized tracking based on major political trends, including the 2010 wave election and Obamacare. Our analysis starts by looking at the partisan composition of these four offices.

Governors
Dem. 17
Rep. 31
Ind. 1
TOTAL 49
UNDECIDED 1
Click here for more details.


Partisan Breakdown: Governors
Party As of November 4, 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 21 18
     Republican Party 29 31
     Independent 0 1
Total 50 50


Partisan Breakdown: Lieutenant Governors
Party As of November 4, 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 16 14
     Republican Party 28 30
     Vacant 1 1
Total 45 45


Partisan Breakdown: Attorneys General
Party As of November 4, 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 26 24
     Republican Party 24 26
Total 50 50


Partisan Breakdown: Secretaries of State
Party As of November 4, 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 20 19
     Republican Party 26 27
     Nonpartisan 1 1
Total 47 47

Priority races

The following races were identified by Ballotpedia staff as the most competitive and interesting state executive elections in 2014.

State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party Office Party Change?
Alaska gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Sean Parnell/Mead Treadwell Ends.png Republican Bill Walker/Bryon Mallott Grey.png Nonpartisan/Electiondot.png Democratic Yes
Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne Ends.png Republican Mark Brnovich Ends.png Republican No
Arizona gubernatorial Jan Brewer Ends.png Republican Doug Ducey Ends.png Republican No
Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel Electiondot.png Democratic Leslie Rutledge Ends.png Republican Yes
Arkansas gubernatorial Mike Beebe Electiondot.png Democratic Asa Hutchinson Ends.png Republican Yes
Colorado Attorney General John W. Suthers Ends.png Republican Cynthia Coffman Ends.png Republican No
Colorado gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial John Hickenlooper/Joseph Garcia Electiondot.png Democratic John Hickenlooper/Joseph Garcia Electiondot.png Democratic No
Florida gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Rick Scott/Carlos Lopez-Cantera Ends.png Republican Rick Scott/Carlos Lopez-Cantera Ends.png Republican No
Georgia gubernatorial Nathan Deal Ends.png Republican Nathan Deal Ends.png Republican No
Illinois gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Pat Quinn/Sheila Simon Electiondot.png Democratic Bruce Rauner/Evelyn Sanguinetti Ends.png Republican Yes
Kansas gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Sam Brownback/Jeff Colyer Ends.png Republican Sam Brownback/Jeff Colyer Ends.png Republican No
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach Ends.png Republican Kris Kobach Ends.png Republican No
Maine gubernatorial Paul LePage Ends.png Republican Paul LePage Ends.png Republican No
Massachusetts gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Deval Patrick/Vacant Electiondot.png Democratic Charles D. Baker/Karyn Polito Ends.png Republican Yes
Michigan attorney general Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican No
Michigan gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Rick Snyder/Brian Calley Ends.png Republican Rick Snyder/Brian Calley Ends.png Republican No
Nebraska gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Dave Heineman/John Nelson Ends.png Republican Pete Ricketts/Mike Foley Ends.png Republican No
Nevada lt. gubernatorial Brian Krolicki Ends.png Republican Mark Hutchison Ends.png Republican No
Pennsylvania gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Tom Corbett/Jim Cawley Ends.png Republican Tom Wolf/Mike Stack Electiondot.png Democratic Yes
South Carolina gubernatorial Nikki Haley Ends.png Republican Nikki Haley Ends.png Republican No
South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond Ends.png Republican Mark Hammond Ends.png Republican No
Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen Ends.png Republican Brad Schimel Ends.png Republican No
Wisconsin gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Scott Walker/Rebecca Kleefisch Ends.png Republican Scott Walker/Rebecca Kleefisch Ends.png Republican No
Wisconsin Secretary of State Doug La Follette Electiondot.png Democratic Doug La Follette Electiondot.png Democratic No

What happened to the governors elected in the 2010 tea party wave?

Twelve Republican challengers replaced Democratic governors during the 2010 midterm elections. All of these first-term governors were seeking re-election in 2014 with hopes of continuing the conservative wave that swept them into office four years earlier. The following table tracks the outcomes of these re-election bids.

Re-election outcomes: 2010 GOP governors
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Florida Rick Scott Ends.png Republican Rick Scott Ends.png Republican No
Iowa Terry E. Branstad Ends.png Republican Terry E. Branstad Ends.png Republican No
Kansas Sam Brownback Ends.png Republican Sam Brownback Ends.png Republican No
Maine Paul LePage Ends.png Republican Paul LePage Ends.png Republican No
Michigan Rick Snyder Ends.png Republican Rick Snyder Ends.png Republican No
New Mexico Susana Martinez Ends.png Republican Susana Martinez Ends.png Republican No
Ohio John Kasich Ends.png Republican John Kasich Ends.png Republican No
Oklahoma Mary Fallin Ends.png Republican Mary Fallin Ends.png Republican No
Pennsylvania Tom Corbett Ends.png Republican Tom Wolf Electiondot.png Democratic Yes
Tennessee Bill Haslam Ends.png Republican Bill Haslam Ends.png Republican No
Wisconsin Scott Walker Ends.png Republican Scott Walker Ends.png Republican No
Wyoming Matt Mead Ends.png Republican Matt Mead Ends.png Republican No

States with Obamacare lawsuits

Attorneys general in 27 states filed lawsuits in 2010 and 2011 challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Two-thirds (18) of those attorney general seats were up for election in 2014. The following table tracks partisan control over these attorney general offices before and after the 2014 election.[6]

Note: Catherine Cortez Masto (D) refused to file a lawsuit against the federal government in 2010, leading then-Gov. Jim Gibbons (R) to appoint attorney Mark Hutchison to sue the government on the state's behalf.[7]

States involved in Obamacare lawsuits
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Alabama Luther Strange Ends.png Republican Luther Strange Ends.png Republican No
Arizona Tom Horne Ends.png Republican Mark Brnovich Ends.png Republican No
Colorado John W. Suthers Ends.png Republican Cynthia Coffman Ends.png Republican No
Florida Pam Bondi Ends.png Republican Pam Bondi Ends.png Republican No
Georgia Samuel S. Olens Ends.png Republican Samuel S. Olens Ends.png Republican No
Idaho Lawrence Wasden Ends.png Republican Lawrence Wasden Ends.png Republican No
Kansas Derek Schmidt Ends.png Republican Derek Schmidt Ends.png Republican No
Michigan Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican No
Nebraska Jon Bruning Ends.png Republican Doug Peterson Ends.png Republican No
Nevada Catherine Cortez Masto Electiondot.png Democratic Adam Paul Laxalt Ends.png Republican Yes
North Dakota Wayne Stenehjem Ends.png Republican Wayne Stenehjem Ends.png Republican No
Ohio Mike DeWine Ends.png Republican Mike DeWine Ends.png Republican No
Oklahoma Scott Pruitt Ends.png Republican Scott Pruitt Ends.png Republican No
South Carolina Alan Wilson Ends.png Republican Alan Wilson Ends.png Republican No
South Dakota Marty J. Jackley Ends.png Republican Marty Jackley Ends.png Republican No
Texas Greg Abbott Ends.png Republican Ken Paxton Ends.png Republican No
Utah Sean Reyes Ends.png Republican Sean Reyes Ends.png Republican No
Wisconsin J.B. Van Hollen Ends.png Republican Brad Schimel Ends.png Republican No

Targeted secretary of state races

Competing political action committees (PACs) emerged in 2014 to exert influence in secretary of state elections across the country. SOS for Democracy and SOS for SOS worked to secure these offices for liberal and conservative interests, respectively. The following table tracks the election outcomes for six races targeted by both SOS for Democracy and SOS for SOS in 2014.[8][9]

Targeted Secretaries of State
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Arizona Ken Bennett Ends.png Republican Michele Reagan Ends.png Republican No
Colorado Scott Gessler Ends.png Republican Wayne Williams Ends.png Republican No
Iowa Matt Schultz Ends.png Republican Paul Pate Ends.png Republican No
Michigan Ruth Johnson Ends.png Republican Ruth Johnson Ends.png Republican No
New Mexico Dianna Duran Ends.png Republican Dianna Duran Ends.png Republican No
Ohio Jon Husted Ends.png Republican Jon Husted Ends.png Republican No

Ballot measures

Policypedia-Main-Logo-no background.png
2014 Special reports

Check out Policypedia articles about statewide ballot measures in the following policy areas.

Energy
Education
Elections
Taxes

What statewide ballot measures were approved?

See also: 2014 statewide ballot measure election results and 2014 ballot measures

Voters weighed in on some of the nation's most contentious topics during the 2014 elections, making this election cycle one of the most significant in recent history. Decisions made at the ballot box established important precedents and set the tone for future elections. Below are the statewide measures Ballotpedia identified as the most important, high-profile and divisive of 2014. These measures were selected based on the issues addressed, the amount of money spent on them, the volume of media attention focused on each, and the likelihood that the outcomes of these measures would affect future ballot measure elections. The chart below was updated as results came in.

Topics on the ballot:

Ballot Measure Outcome Yes No Precincts Reporting Topic
Alaska Marijuana Legalization, Ballot Measure 2 (2014)
Approveda
53.23 (%) 46.77 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana


California Proposition 45, Public Notice Required for Insurance Company Rates Initiative (2014)
Defeatedd
40.87 (%) 59.13 (%) 100 (%) Insurance


California Proposition 46, Medical Malpractice Lawsuits Cap and Drug Testing of Doctors (2014)
Defeatedd
32.93 (%) 67.07 (%) 100 (%) Healthcare
Colorado Mandatory Labeling of GMOs Initiative, Proposition 105 (2014)
Defeatedd
34.53 (%) 65.47 (%) 100 (%) Business regulation


Florida Right to Medical Marijuana Initiative, Amendment 2 (2014)
Defeatedd
57.62 (%) 42.38 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana


Missouri Teacher Performance Evaluation, Amendment 3 (2014)
Defeatedd
23.57 (%) 76.43 (%) 100 (%) Labor


Nevada Margin Tax for Public Schools Initiative, Question 3 (2014)
Defeatedd
21.26 (%) 78.74 (%) 100 (%) Taxes


Oregon Legalized Marijuana Initiative, Measure 91 (2014)
Approveda
56.11 (%) 43.89 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana


Oregon Mandatory Labeling of GMOs Initiative, Measure 92 (2014)
Defeatedd
49.97 (%) 50.03 (%) 100 (%) Business regulation


Tennessee Legislative Powers Regarding Abortion, Amendment 1 (2014)
Approveda
52.61 (%) 47.39 (%) 100 (%) Abortion


Washington Class Size Reduction Measure, Initiative 1351 (2014)
Approveda
50.96 (%) 49.04 (%) 100 (%) Education


Washington Gun Rights Measure, Initiative 591 (2014)
Defeatedd
44.73 (%) 55.27 (%) 100 (%) Firearms


Washington Universal Background Checks for Gun Purchases, Initiative 594 (2014)
Approveda
59.27 (%) 40.73 (%) 100 (%) Firearms



What local ballot measures were approved?

See also: 2014 local ballot measure election results and Local ballot measure elections in 2014

Voters cast ballots on thousands of local measures on November 4. The chart below captures some of the most notable local ballot measures across the nation, including those addressing topics like marijuana, GMOs, fracking, business taxes and the minimum wage. The chart on this page was updated as races were called.

For more details about real-time updates for the notable local ballot measures in the table, see this page.

In the table below there are 60 notable measures. Topics addressed include:

Ballot Measure Outcome Yes No Total Votes Topic
City of Phoenix Pension Reform Initiative, Proposition 487 (November 2014)
Defeatedd
43.5 (%) 56.5 (%) 100 (%) Pensions
Alachua County Citizens United Advisory Referendum: "Corporations are not People, Money is not Speech" (November 2014)
Approveda
71.51(%) 28.49(%) 100 (%) Definition of a corporation
Bernalillo County Marijuana Decriminalization Advisory Question, Measure 1 (November 2014)
Approveda
59.51 (%) 40.49 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Butte County Medical Marijuana Initiative, Measure B (November 2014)
Defeatedd
33.08 (%) 66.92 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Butte County Medical Marijuana Ordinance 4075 Referendum, Measure A (November 2014)
Approveda
61.59 (%) 38.41 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Cañon City Marijuana Retail Legalization, Measure 2C (November 2014)
Defeatedd
38.48 (%) 61.52 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Anchorage Ordinance 37 "Responsible Labor Act" Veto Referendum (November 2014)
Defeatedd
46.15 (%) 53.83 (%) 100 (%) Labor and unions
City of Appleton $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
59.26 (%) 40.74 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of Athens Fracking Ban Initiative, Issue 7 (November 2014)
Approveda
78.28 (%) 21.72 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
City of Berkeley Redistricting Map Referendum, Measure S (November 2014)
Approveda
64.16 (%) 35.84 (%) 100 (%) Incorporation, merging and boundaries of local jurisdictions
City of Berkeley Sugary Beverages and Soda Tax Question, Measure D (November 2014)
Approveda
75.12 (%) 24.88 (%) 100 (%) Business tax
City of Clare Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Defeatedd
44.11 (%) 55.89 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Berkley Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
62.25 (%) 37.75 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Denton Fracking Ban Initiative (November 2014)
Approveda
58.64 (%) 41.36 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
City of Encinitas Medical Marijuana Initiative, Proposition F (November 2014)
Defeatedd
43.91 (%) 56.09 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Eureka "Fair Wage Act" Minimum Wage Initiative, Measure R (November 2014)
Defeatedd
37.99 (%) 62.01 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of Frankfort Marijuana Legalization Proposal (November 2014)
Defeatedd
44.86 (%) 55.14 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Harrison Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Defeatedd
36.54 (%) 63.46 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Huntington Woods Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
69.80 (%) 30.20 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Lapeer Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Tied
49.84 (%) 50.16 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Lewiston Recreational Marijuana Legalization Measure (November 2014)
Defeatedd
45.07 (%) 54.93 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Manitou Springs Retail Marijuana Ban, Measure 2G (November 2014)
Defeatedd
34.96 (%) 65.04 (%) 100 Marijuana
City of Menasha $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
62.00 (%) 38 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of Mount Pleasant Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
62.27 (%) 37.73 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Neenah $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
60.20 (%) 39.80 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of Oakland Minimum Wage Increase Initiative, Measure FF (November 2014)
Approveda
81.18 (%) 18.82 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of Onaway Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Defeatedd
35.65 (%) 64.35 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Pleasant Ridge Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
70.16 (%) 29.84 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Port Huron Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
51.45 (%) 48.55 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Rancho Santa Margarita Former Nissan Dealership Zone Change, Measure Z (November 2014)
Defeatedd
45.74 (%) 54.26 (%) 100 (%) Zoning, land use and development
City of Sacramento "Strong Mayor" Mayor-Council Form of Government Charter Amendment, Measure L (November 2014)
Defeatedd
42.78 (%) 57.22 (%) 100 (%) Charter amendments
City of Saginaw Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014)
Approveda
62.70 (%) 37.30 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of San Francisco Minimum Wage Increase Referred Measure, Proposition J (November 2014)
Approveda
76.83 (%) 23.17 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
City of San Francisco Sugary Drink Tax, Proposition E (November 2014)
Defeatedd
54.50 (%)[10] 45.50 (%) 100 (%) Business tax
City of Santa Ana Council-Referred Medical Marijuana Regulation Ordinance, Measure BB (November 2014)
Approveda
65.5 (%) 34.5 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Santa Ana Medical Cannabis Restriction and Limitation Initiative, Measure CC (November 2014)
Defeatedd
54.2 (%)[11] 45.8 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Santa Monica Airport Development Council-Referred Question, Measure LC (November 2014)
Approveda
59.73 (%) 40.27 (%) 100 (%) Zoning, land use and development
City of Santa Monica Voter Approval of Airport Development Initiative, Measure D (November 2014)
Defeatedd
43.61 (%) 56.39 (%) 100 (%) Zoning, land use and development
City of South Portland Recreational Marijuana Legalization Measure (November 2014)
Approveda
52.36 (%) 47.64 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
City of Wichita Sales Tax Measure (November 2014)
Defeatedd
37.62 (%) 62.38 (%) 100 (%) Sales tax
Dane County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
73.63 (%) 26.37 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
Eau Claire County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
60.82 (%) 39.18 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
Humboldt County "Genetic Contamination Prevention Ordinance" GMO Ban Initiative, Measure P (November 2014)
Approveda
59.43 (%) 40.57 (%) 100 (%) GMO
Kenosha County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
62.87 (%) 37.13 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
Lake County "Freedom to Garden Human Rights Restoration Act" Initiative, Measure P (November 2014)
Defeatedd
31.99 (%) 68.01 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Lake County "Medical Marijuana Control Act" Initiative, Measure O (November 2014)
Defeatedd
36.46 (%) 63.54 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Maui County Genetically Modified Organism Moratorium Initiative (November 2014)
Approveda
51.19 (%) 48.81 (%) 100 (%) GMO
Mendocino County Community Bill of Rights Fracking and Water Use Initiative, Measure S (November 2014)
Approveda
67.18 (%) 32.82 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
Milwaukee County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
67.49 (%) 32.51 (%) 100 (%) Minimum wage
San Benito County Fracking Ban Initiative, Measure J (November 2014)
Approveda
57.36 (%) 42.64 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
Santa Barbara County Fracking Ban Initiative, Measure P (November 2014)
Defeatedd
37.35 (%) 62.65 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
Santa Fe County Marijuana Decriminalization Advisory Question (November 2014)
Approveda
73.10 (%) 26.90 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Shasta County Outdoor Medical Marijuana Ordinance Referendum, Measure A (November 2014)
Approveda
58.52 (%) 41.48 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Lakewood Marijuana Retail Ban, Measure 2A (November 2014)
Approveda
54.92 (%) 45.08 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Palisade Retail Marijuana Legalization, Measure 2A (November 2014)
Tied
49.11 (%) 50.89 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Palmer Lake Marijuana Retail Legalization & Taxation, Measure 300 (November 2014)
Defeatedd
46.95 (%) 53.05 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Palmer Lake Recreational Marijuana Retail Ban, Measure 301 (November 2014)
Approveda
52.72 (%) 47.28 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Paonia Marijuana Retail Legalization Referendum, Measure 2B (November 2014)
Defeatedd
46.74 (%) 53.26 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Ramah Marijuana Retail Legalization, Measure 2B (November 2014)
Defeatedd
21.43 (%) 78.57 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Town of Red Cliff Marijuana Retail Ban, Question 2G (November 2014)
Defeatedd
42.31 (%) 57.69 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Village of Gates Mills "Community Bill of Rights" Fracking Ban, Issue 51 (November 2014)
Defeatedd
30.7 (%) 69.3 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
City of Kent "Community Bill of Rights" Fracking Ban Initiative, Issue 21 (November 2014)
Defeatedd
46.31 (%) 53.69 (%) 100 (%) Fracking
Washington D.C. Marijuana Legalization, Initiative 71 (November 2014)
Approveda
64.61 (%) 28.44 (%) 100 (%) Marijuana
Youngstown "Community Bill of Rights" Frack Ban, Issue 4 (November 2014)
Defeatedd
41.99 (%) 57.85 (%) 100 (%) Fracking

State courts

Check out Judgepedia's election night coverage for further details about judicial races across the country.

What happened to state supreme courts and the balance of power

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Links to all election results, 2014

Judgepedia's extensive coverage of state judicial races this year included some notable state supreme court races. The stakes--and price tags--for the races listed below were high. A few things we were watching for on November 4, 2014:

A total of 26 states held elections for their courts of last resort in 2014. Many candidates were unopposed or faced a retention election. In fact, only eight states had one or more contested supreme court races on their November ballot. The most competitive of these are included below. For more information on these races see here.

Michigan Supreme Court races

Currently, the Michigan Supreme Court has five Republicans and two Democrats on its bench. This situation will remain, as there was one Democratic victory and two Republican victories on November 4. Republican Justices Viviano and Zahra kept their seats, while Democrat Richard Bernstein picked up a win for the seat previously held by Democratic Justice Michael Cavanagh. This was a state where the partisan balance could have flipped, but those Democratic hopes were ended with Republican Justice David Viviano's victory.

Though Michigan's elections are technically nonpartisan, candidates are nominated by party committees.


8-year term (2 seats)
Candidate Vote %
Brian Zahra Republican Party32.0%
James Robert Redford Republican Party20.6%
Richard Bernstein Democratic Party28.7%
William B. Murphy Democratic Party14.1%
Doug Dern Independent4.5%
100% of counties reporting[12]
Current justices Michael Cavanagh
Brian Zahra
Winners Richard Bernstein
Brian Zahra


2-year term
Candidate Vote %
David Viviano Republican Party61.7%
Deborah Thomas Democratic Party28.7%
Kerry L. Morgan Independent9.6%
100% of counties reporting[13]
Current justice David Viviano
Winner David Viviano

North Carolina Supreme Court races

The Supreme Court of North Carolina, which went into November 4 with a 5-2 Republican majority, gained one Democratic justice this year, as Sam Ervin was victorious over Robert N. Hunter, Jr. Michael Robinson remained the Republicans' only chance to gain that seat back, but he was narrowly defeated by incumbent Justice Cheri Beasley, a Democrat.

North Carolina's judicial elections are technically nonpartisan. However, it is a state where the justices' political affiliations are clearly known and political parties may publicly endorse candidates. Currently, the Supreme Court of North Carolina has five Republicans and two Democrats on its bench. In 2014 four seats were up for election, meaning that a majority of the seven-member court was up for grabs.

Three Democratic seats and one Republican seat were initially up for election this year. Two of those seats--the chief justice position and Justice Martin's open seat--were given new, Republican incumbents thanks to appointments by Governor Pat McCrory in August 2014. That resulted in the chief justice position changing from a Democratic incumbent (Sarah Parker, who retired) to a Republican incumbent (Mark Martin, who is running for a full term in 2014). Thus, for the November elections, two open seats are occupied by Republicans and two by Democrats.

A partisan flip was not possible, even though a majority of the court's seats were up for election, because it would have required Democrats to win all four seats and there were no Democrats in the race for chief justice.


Chief Justice seat
Candidate Vote %
Mark Martin Republican Party72.3%
Ola M. Lewis Republican Party27.7%
100% of precincts reporting[14]
Current justice Sarah Parker
Winner Mark Martin


Martin seat
Candidate Vote %
Robert N. Hunter, Jr. Republican Party47.4%
Sam Ervin Democratic Party52.6%
100% of precincts reporting[15]
Current justice Mark Martin (Robert Hunter temporarily appointed)
Winner Sam Ervin


Beasley seat
Candidate Vote %
Cheri Beasley Democratic Party50.1%
Michael L. Robinson Republican Party49.9%
100% of precincts reporting[16]
Current justice Cheri Beasley
Winner Cheri Beasley


Hudson seat
Candidate Vote %
Robin Hudson Democratic Party52.4%
Eric L. Levinson Republican Party47.6%
100% of precincts reporting[17]
Current justice Robin Hudson
Winner Robin Hudson

Ohio Supreme Court races

Though Ohio holds nonpartisan general elections, its primaries are partisan, so the political affiliations of the judicial candidates are commonly known. The two Republican justices up for election this year were victorious, keeping the partisan balance of the Ohio Supreme Court at six Republicans and one Democrat.[18]


French seat
Candidate Vote %
Judith French Republican Party56.0%
John P. O'Donnell Democratic Party44.0%
100% of precincts reporting[19]
Current justice Judith French
Winner Judith French


Kennedy seat
Candidate Vote %
Sharon L. Kennedy Republican Party72.6%
Tom Letson Democratic Party27.4%
100% of precincts reporting[20]
Current justice Sharon L. Kennedy
Winner Sharon L. Kennedy

Texas Supreme Court races

Four Republican justices were re-elected in 2014, maintaining the GOP's monopoly on the Texas Supreme Court.

In the race for Place 6, Justice Jeff Brown was challenged by a judge of the state's other high court, Lawrence Meyers. Meyers has served on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals since 1992. He was also a Republican for his entire judicial career, but chose to run as a Democrat in this election. Apparently, his history did not benefit him, as he was decidedly defeated by Justice Brown.


Brown seat (Place 6)
Candidate Vote %
Jeff Brown Republican Party60.4%
Lawrence Meyers Democratic Party36.5%
Mark Ash Independent3.2%
98.75% of precincts reporting[21]
Current justice Jeff Brown
Winner Jeff Brown


Boyd seat (Place 6)
Candidate Vote %
Jeff Boyd Republican Party58.9%
Gina Benavides Democratic Party37.6%
Don Fulton Independent2.8%
Charles E. Waterbury Independent0.7%
98.75% of precincts reporting[22]
Current justice Jeff Boyd
Winner Jeff Boyd

Texas Court of Criminal Appeals race

Although retirements put three races without incumbents on the 2014 ballot for this court, the only race with both a Republican and Democratic candidate in the general election was the race for Place 3. Republican Bert Richardson's dominance in the fundraising for this race, seemed to correlate to the results, as he handily defeated Democratic candidate John Granberg.

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has eight Republicans and one Democrat on its bench. However, Judge Lawrence Meyers only recently switched from the Republican to the Democratic party, so the GOP, in reality, holds a monopoly on the court.

Price seat (Place 3)
Candidate Vote %
Bert Richardson Republican Party59.9%
John Granberg Democratic Party36.5%
Mark W. Bennett Independent3.6%
98.75% of precincts reporting[23]
Current justice Tom Price
Winner Bert Richardson

Montana Supreme Court race

Justice Mike Wheat was decidedly re-elected despite a notable fundraising effort by his challenger. He was almost unopposed due to a question of challenger Lawrence VanDyke's eligibility earlier in the year. That was sorted out and the state supreme court ruled that VanDyke could compete. The race then became one to watch because VanDyke was supported by the Republican State Leadership Committee, a national conservative group with its hands in a number of key 2014 judicial races. In a state that mandates nonpartisan judicial elections, partisan undertones crept into this race and both candidates raised significant sums of money. However, it was not enough for VanDyke to overcome incumbent Wheat.


Wheat seat (Seat 2)
Candidate Vote %
Mike Wheat59.1%
Lawrence VanDyke40.9%
100% of precincts reporting[24][25]
Current justice Mike Wheat
Winner Mike Wheat

School boards

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United States SenateUnited States HouseTrifectas and state government controlState legislaturesState executivesBallot measuresState courtsSchool boardsMunicipal elections

Links to all election results, 2014
See also: School board elections, 2014

For comprehensive coverage of all the school board elections that occurred in the nation's largest school districts, visit our school board elections page.

We selected the following 25 races for more extensive coverage due to a variety of factors. Several of these elections were in districts with more than 100,000 students enrolled, some featured especially contentious issues at stake such as Common Core, charter schools and teacher merit pay, and some could have resulted in a change of the board's leadership and governing majority.

2014 School Board Elections
District State Seats up for election Total board seats Winners
Ann Arbor Public Schools Michigan 4 7 Susan Baskett (i), Donna Lasinski, Patricia Ashford Manley and Christine Stead (i)
Antioch Unified School District California 2 5 Walter Ruehlig and Debra Vinson
Chandler Unified School District Arizona 2 5 Annette Auxier (i) and Robert Rice (i)
Clark County School District Nevada 3 7 Kevin Child, Erin E. Cranor (i) and Carolyn Edwards (i)
Gilbert Public Schools Arizona 2 5 Jill Humpherys (i) and J. Charles Santa Cruz
Gwinnett County Public Schools Georgia 2 5 Dan Seckinger (R, i) and Bob McClure (R, i)
Howard County Public Schools Maryland 4 7 Sandra H. French (i), Cynthia L. Vaillancourt (i), Bess I. Altwerger and Christine O'Connor
Indianapolis Public Schools Indiana 3 7 Mary Ann Sullivan, Kelly Bentley and LaNier L. Echols
Jefferson County Public Schools Kentucky 4 7 Diane Porter (i), Stephanie Horne, Linda Duncan (i) and Lisa Willner
Jefferson Parish Public Schools Louisiana 9 9 Marion "Coach" Bonura (R), Melinda Bourgeois (R), Larry Dale (R, i), Sandy Denapolis-Bosarge (R, i), Cedric Floyd (D, i), Mark Morgan (I, i) and Ray St. Pierre (R, i); runoffs in District 2 and District 7
Jersey City Public Schools New Jersey 3 9 Gerald Lyons, Lorenzo Richardson and Joel Torres
Mobile County Public School System Alabama 2 5 Reginald Crenshaw (D, i) and Robert Edward Battles Sr. (D)
Montgomery County Public Schools Maryland 4 7 Judy Docca (i), Mike Durso (i), Patricia O'Neill (i) and Jill Ortman-Fouse
Omaha Public Schools Nebraska 4 9 Marque A. Snow (i), Justin T. Wayne (i), Matt Scanlan (i) and Lacey Merica (i)
Prince George's County Public Schools Maryland 4 9 Carolyn M. Boston (i), Lupi Grady, Dinora A. Hernandez and Sonya Williams (i)
Rialto Unified School District California 2 5 Edgar Montes (i) and Dina Walker
San Diego Unified School District California 2 5 Kevin Beiser (i) and Michael G. McQuary
Santa Clara Unified School District California 4 7 Jim Canova (i), Jodi Muirhead, Andrew Ratermann (i) and Noelani Sallings
Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District California 4 7 Craig Foster, Laurie Lieberman (i), Richard Tahvildaran-Jesswein and Oscar de la Torre (i)
Sweetwater Union High School District California 5 5 Paula Hall, Kevin J. Pike, Nicholas Segura, Arturo Solis and Frank A. Tarantino
Toms River Regional Schools New Jersey 3 9 Ben Giovine (i), Robert Onofrietti Jr. and Loreen Torrone (i)
Tucson Unified School District Arizona 2 5 Adelita Grijalva (i) and Michael Hicks (i)
Vernon Parish School District Louisiana 12 12 John Blankenbaker (R, i), Doug Brandon (R, i), Gerald Cooley (R, i), David J. Detz (R), Randi Schamerhorn Gleason (R, i), William "Randy" Martin (D, i), Michael "Mike" Perkins (I, i), Robert Pynes Jr. (D, i), Jim Seaman (I), Vernon Travis Jr. (D, i), Angie Wise-Davis (D) and Steve Woods (I, i)
Washoe County School District Nevada 3 7 Veronica Frenkel, John R. Mayer (i) and Nick Smith
West Contra Costa Unified School District California 3 5 Elizabeth Block, Valerie Cuevas and Madeline Kronenberg (i)

Municipal elections

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2014 Elections:
What's at Stake?

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Links to all election results, 2014
See also: United States municipal elections, 2014

There were 108 seats up for election in the largest 100 cities on November 4. Thirteen of the largest 100 cities held elections for mayor, while 25 cities held city council elections. The four cities with the most intriguing races were:

Note: Last updated: 4:12 pm February 12, 2015.

Washington, D.C. municipal elections, 2014

Washington, D.C. will be electing a new mayor this year after Muriel Bowser (D) defeated incumbent Vincent Gray (D) in the Democratic primary. Polling in late September put Bowser eight points ahead of City Councilman David Catania (I). Hot-button issues in this race include public transportation, cost of living, school reform and marijuana.

Washington, D.C. Mayoral Election, 2014
Candidate Party Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Muriel Bowser Democratic Party 80,303 53.92% Green check mark transparent.png
Faith Green Party 1,168 0.78%
Bruce Majors Libertarian Party 982 0.66%
David Catania Independent 52,618 35.33%
Nestor Djonkam Independent 361 0.24%
Carol Schwartz Independent 10,583 7.11%

Source: District of Columbia Board of Elections - 100% of precincts reporting

San Diego, California municipal elections, 2014

San Diego has a crucial race in District 6 this year. Although both candidates are officially nonpartisan, Carol Kim is endorsed by the San Diego County Democratic Party and Chris Cate is endorsed by current mayor Kevin Faulconer (R). On the current council, Democratic-affiliated members hold a 6-3 majority and are able to veto Faulconer's policies. Should Cate win this seat, that would revert to a 5-4 majority that holds no veto power. Polling in September put Cate 11 points ahead of Kim. For more information on the council majority situation, click here.

San Diego, California City Council Elections, 2014
Candidate Affiliation Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Chris Cate Republican Party 13,399 54.57% Green check mark transparent.png
Carol Kim Democratic Party 11,155 45.43%

Source: County of San Diego - 100% of precincts reporting

Oakland, California municipal elections, 2014

See also: Ranked-choice voting

The mayoral election in Oakland, California may be a source of intense drama. In 2010, Jean Quan gained enough votes in the final round of voting to leapfrog Don Perata, who had led the entire vote counting process, to win the mayor's seat. Oakland uses a system called ranked-choice voting that allows voters to select up to three candidates in order of preference and transfers their votes as candidates are defeated. Polling in September put city councilwoman and 2010 third-place candidate Rebecca Kaplan 12 points ahead of Quan, but due to how votes are transferred during the election that margin might mean little.

Oakland, California Mayoral Election, 2014
Candidate First Preference Votes Vote % Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Jason "Shake" Anderson 816 1.46%
Peter Yuan Liu 246 0.44%
Patrick K. McCullough 207 0.37%
Bryan Parker 4,481 8.03%
Jean Quan - Incumbent 8,819 15.81%
Courtney Ruby 1,775 3.18%
Saied Karamooz 136 0.24%
Elizabeth "Libby" Schaaf 16,243 29.11% 26,368 62.79% Green check mark transparent.png
Nancy Sidebotham 161 0.29%
Dan Siegel 6,758 12.11%
Joseph Tuman 6,911 12.39%
Charles Ray Williams 642 1.15%
Ken Houston 296 0.53%
Rebecca Kaplan 8,089 14.50% 15,623 37.21%
Eric Wilson 218 0.39%

Source: Alameda County Registrar of Voters - 100% of precincts reporting

Austin, Texas municipal elections, 2014

The city of Austin, Texas is holding elections for the first time under new rules passed in November 2012. These changes included creating four new city council seats, establishing ten districts by which individual council members are elected, and imposing term limits of three, three-year terms. Previously, the six council members were all elected at-large without term limits. These new rules left only two incumbents, Chris Riley and Kathryne Beth Tovo, eligible to run. As both are running in District 9, this means Austin will elect a new mayor and nine new city council members.

Austin, Texas Municipal Elections, 2014
Seat Total Votes Vote % Runoff? Winner(s)
Mayor 64,279 / 51,804 36.763% / 29.63% Yes Stephen Adler / Mike Martinez
District 1 6,421 / 1,884 49.12% / 14.41% Yes Ora Houston / DeWayne Lofton
District 2 5,568 65.76% No Delia Garza
District 3 2,137 / 1,914 20.99% / 18.80% Yes Susana Almanza / Sabino "Pio" Renteria
District 4 3,268 / 1,822 38.65% / 21.55% Yes Gregorio Casar / Laura Pressley
District 5 11,378 53.62% No Ann Kitchen
District 6 3,722 / 3,697 24.21% / 24.05% Yes Donald S. Zimmerman / James T. Flannigan
District 7 6,262 / 3,292 32.14% / 16.89% Yes Leslie Pool / Jefferson E. Boyt
District 8 5,676 / 5,496 26.38% / 25.54% Yes Ellen Troxclair / Edward S. Scruggs
District 9 10,003 / 8,241 49.05% / 40.41% Yes Kathryne Beth Tovo / Chris Riley
District 10 8,539 / 6,386 30.65% / 22.93% Yes Amanda "Mandy" Dealey / Sheri P. Gallo

Source: Travis County Clerk - 100% of precincts reporting

See also

References

  1. Note: This total did not New York and Washington. Both states elected Democratic trifectas before a coalition in the state senate swung party control to the minority Republicans.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Note: Illinois and Minnesota were not in this list prior to election night but were added on November 4. New York was included initially but removed owing to the minority coalition situation.
  3. Omaha.com, "Democrats cut into GOP lead in Nebraska Legislature," accessed May 13, 2014 (dead link)
  4. Note: West Virginia was originally tied but State Senator Daniel Hall changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party the day after the election, giving partisan control to the Republicans.
  5. Note: The West Virginia State Senate was originally tied but State Senator Daniel Hall changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party the day after the election, giving partisan control to the Republicans.
  6. The Daily Signal, "List of 27 States Suing Over Obamacare," January 27, 2011
  7. Legal Newsline, "Governor hires lawyer to fight Obamacare," April 8, 2010
  8. SOS for Democracy, "Races to Watch," accessed October 23, 2014
  9. SOS for SOS, "Home," accessed October 23, 2014
  10. A 2/3rds supermajority vote was required for the approval of Measure E
  11. Although Measure CC received a majority approval, its competing measure received more "yes" votes, invalidating Measure CC.
  12. Michigan Department of State, "2014 General Election Results - Justice of Supreme Court 8 Year Terms (2) Positions," November 4, 2014
  13. Michigan Department of State, "2014 General Election Results - Justice of Supreme Court Partial Term Ending 01/01/2017," November 4, 2014
  14. North Carolina State Board of Elections, "Unofficial Statewide General Election Results 2014," November 4, 2014
  15. North Carolina State Board of Elections, "Unofficial Statewide General Election Results 2014," November 4, 2014
  16. North Carolina State Board of Elections, "Unofficial Statewide General Election Results 2014," November 4, 2014
  17. North Carolina State Board of Elections, "Unofficial Statewide General Election Results 2014," November 4, 2014
  18. Cleveland.com, "Justices Sharon Kennedy, Judith French appear headed to election victories," November 4, 2014
  19. Ohio Secretary of State, "General Election Results - Supreme Court," November 4, 2014
  20. Ohio Secretary of State, "General Election Results - Supreme Court," November 4, 2014
  21. Texas Secretary of State, "2014 General Election Results," November 4, 2014
  22. Texas Secretary of State, "2014 General Election Results," November 4, 2014
  23. Texas Secretary of State, "2014 General Election Results," November 4, 2014
  24. KRTV.com, "Election 2014 in Montana: Updated Results," November 4, 2014
  25. Bozeman Daily Chronicle, "Wheat, Rice win re-election to Montana Supreme Court," November 4, 2014