Election results, 2014

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2014 Elections:
What's At Stake?


Ballotpedia Fast Facts: Brittany Clingen details
what's at stake in the November election.

Table of Contents

United States SenateUnited States HouseTrifectas and state government control
State legislaturesState executivesBallot measuresState courtsSchool boards
Municipal elections

Links to all election results, 2014
The 2014 general election is like a political Super Bowl. The United States isn’t picking a new President, but the national stakes are huge. Majority leadership of the Senate hangs in the balance. On a state level, a few key races in various legislative chambers could help swing as much as 80 percent of the country into single-party controlled state governments, Republican or Democrat.

From the East Coast to the West Coast and all points between, there’s suspense up and down the ballot. Heated races for political office. Ballot initiatives on marijuana and fracking. Gubernatorial, judicial, municipal and school board elections.

It's hard to keep track of all the drama. That's why Ballotpedia and Judgepedia team members will be working around the clock election week, compiling results and highlighting major outcomes and political trends.

On election night results will come pouring in. Staff will be updating this page--and all election pages on this site--on a regular basis. That's the game plan. Stay tuned regularly for all the political scores.

For a guide into all of the comprehensive coverage that Ballotpedia and Judgepedia will offer, visit this page.

Note: This page was last updated at 11:44 am October 29, 2014.

What are the big questions?

Twitter feed updates

United States Senate

See also: U.S. Senate elections, 2014
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2014 Elections:
What's at Stake?

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Links to all election results, 2014

Who ends up with majority control of the U.S. Senate?

All eyes are on which party will control the U.S. Senate in 2015. The current Democratic-controlled Senate has a partisan breakdown of 53-45-2, with the two Independents caucusing with the Democrats. For Republicans to take the majority in the Senate, they need to take at least six of the 36 seats up for election that are currently held by Democrats, and retain control of the 15 seats currently held by Republicans. The section will update the seat count for each party throughout the night and the vote totals in the hotly contested races.

Note: The table below will be updated in real-time on election night. As races are called, we will continually update the partisan count totals.

U.S. Senate
Dem. 32
Rep. 30
Ind. 2
TOTAL 64
UNDECIDED 36
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014. Full coverage
State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party Seat Party Change?
Alaska Senate Mark Begich Democratic Party
Arkansas Senate Mark Pryor Democratic Party
Colorado Senate Mark Udall Democratic Party
Georgia Senate Saxby Chambliss* Republican Party
Iowa Senate Tom Harkin* Democratic Party
Kentucky Senate Pat Roberts Republican Party
Kentucky Senate Mitch McConnell Republican Party
Louisisana Senate Mary Landrieu Democratic Party
Montana Senate John Walsh* Democratic Party
New Hampshire Senate Jeanne Shaheen Democratic Party
North Carolina Senate Kay Hagan Democratic Party
South Dakota Senate Tim Johnson* Democratic Party
West Virginia Senate Jay Rockefeller* Democratic Party

"*" indicates that the incumbent is retiring in 2014.

U.S. Senate, Alaska General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Mark Begich Incumbent 0% 0
     Republican Dan Sullivan 0% 0
     Libertarian Mark Fish 0% 0
     Independent Ted Gianoutsos 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Arkansas General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Mark Pryor Incumbent 0% 0
     Republican Tom Cotton 0% 0
     Libertarian Nathan LaFrance 0% 0
     Green Mark Swaney 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Colorado General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Mark Udall Incumbent 0% 0
     Republican Cory Gardner 0% 0
     Libertarian Gaylon Kent 0% 0
     Unity Party of Colorado Bill Hammons 0% 0
     Independent Raul Acosta 0% 0
     Independent Steve Shogan 0% 0
     Independent Willoughby 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Georgia General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Michelle Nunn 0% 0
     Republican David Perdue 0% 0
     Libertarian Amanda Swafford 0% 0
Total Votes 0
Source: Georgia Secretary of State Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.




U.S. Senate, Kansas General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Pat Roberts Incumbent 0% 0
     Independent Greg Orman 0% 0
     Libertarian Randall Batson 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Kentucky General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Mitch McConnell Incumbent 0% 0
     Democratic Alison Lundergan Grimes 0% 0
     Libertarian David Patterson 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Louisiana General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Mary Landrieu Incumbent 0% 0
     Democratic Wayne Ables 0% 0
     Democratic Raymond Brown 0% 0
     Democratic Vallian Senegal 0% 0
     Democratic William Waymire Jr. 0% 0
     Republican Bill Cassidy 0% 0
     Republican Rob Maness 0% 0
     Republican Thomas Clements 0% 0
     Libertarian Brannon Lee McMorris 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, Montana General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Steve Daines 0% 0
     Democratic Amanda Curtis 0% 0
     Libertarian Roger Roots 0% 0
Total Votes 0



U.S. Senate, New Hampshire General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Jeanne Shaheen Incumbent 0% 0
     Republican Scott Brown 0% 0
     Write-in Write-in candidates 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, South Dakota General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Mike Rounds 0% 0
     Democratic Rick Weiland 0% 0
     Independent Larry Pressler 0% 0
     Independent Gordon Howie 0% 0
Total Votes 0




U.S. Senate, West Virginia General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Shelley Moore Capito 0% 0
     Democratic Natalie Tennant 0% 0
     Libertarian John Buckley 0% 0
     Constitution Phil Hudok 0% 0
     Mountain Bob Henry Baber 0% 0
     Independent Alex Weinstein - Write-in 0% 0
Total Votes 0

United States House

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Does the Democratic Party reduce the Republican U.S. House majority?

See also: United States House of Representatives elections, 2014 and U.S. House battleground districts, 2014

All 435 U.S. House of Representatives seats are up for election. Republicans currently hold a 233-199 majority (with three vacancies). Democrats would need to pick up 19 seats to flip control. On this page, Ballotpedia will track the districts identified as battleground districts. Below the battleground chart, we will also track any unexpectedly close races that develop throughout election night.

Note: The table below will be updated in real-time on election night. As races are called, we will continually update the partisan count totals.

U.S. House
Dem. 0
Rep. 0
Ind. 0
TOTAL 0
UNDECIDED 435
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014. Full coverage
State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party District Party Change?
Arizona's 1st District Ann Kirkpatrick Democratic Party
Arizona's 2nd District Ron Barber Democratic Party
Arizona's 9th District Kyrsten Sinema Democratic Party
California's 7th District Ami Bera Democratic Party
California's 21st District David Valadao Republican Party
California's 36th District Raul Ruiz Democratic Party
California's 52nd District Scott Peters Democratic Party
Colorado's 6th District Mike Coffman Republican Party
Florida's 18th District Patrick Murphy Democratic Party
Florida's 26th District Joe Garcia Democratic Party
Illinois' 12th District William Enyart Democratic Party
Illinois' 13th District Rodney Davis Republican Party
Michigan's 1st District Dan Benishek Republican Party
Minnesota's 8th District Rick Nolan Democratic Party
Nevada's 3rd District Joe Heck Republican Party
New Hampshire's 1st District Carol Shea-Porter Democratic Party
New Jersey's 2nd District Frank LoBiondo Republican Party
New Jersey's 3rd District Jon Runyan* Republican Party
New York's 1st District Tim Bishop Democratic Party
New York's 11th District Michael Grimm Republican Party
New York's 18th District Sean Maloney Democratic Party
New York's 21st District Bill Owens* Democratic Party
New York's 23rd District Tom Reed Republican Party
Texas' 23rd District Pete Gallego Democratic Party
Virginia's 2nd District Scott Rigell Republican Party
West Virginia's 3rd District Nick Rahall Democratic Party

"*" indicates that the incumbent is retiring in 2014.

Unexpected upsets

Unexpectedly close races will be tracked here as election night progresses.

Trifectas and state government control

See also: Gubernatorial and legislative party control of state government
What's at stake with trifectas on election night.

Ballotpedia's coverage of state legislative and gubernatorial races includes up-to-date information about state government trifectas. A trifecta is when one political party holds the governorship, a majority in the state senate and a majority in the state house. If a state doesn't have a trifecta, that means it has divided government.

State government trifectas are important because one-party control can lead to significant changes in public policy. Because of increasing levels of political polarization, trifectas are at an all-time high. Following this election, more than 80 percent of the country's state governments could be trifectas.

The following sections detail how the 2014 elections have changed the landscape of trifectas across the United States.

Who controls state governments?

Pre-election: Heading into election night, there are 37 trifectas.

Post-election: Pending
Note: The table below will be updated in real-time on election night. As races are called, we will continually update the partisan count totals.

Trifectas
Dem. 0
Rep. 2
Divided 2
TOTAL 4
UNDECIDED 46
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014.

Possible new trifectas

  • Arkansas: For Arkansas to become a trifecta, both legislative chambers would have to stay Republican and the governor's office would have to swing Republican. Republican candidate Asa Hutchinson has led Democratic candidate Mike Ross in polls since spring.
  • Iowa: For Iowa to become a trifecta, the Iowa House of Representatives and the governor's office would have to stay Republican and the Iowa State Senate would have to swing Republican. The Democrats hold a 26-24 majority in the state Senate with 25 seats up for election in 2014.
  • New Hampshire: New Hampshire is considered a possible trifecta for both parties, as the voters of New Hampshire have a tendency to demonstrate fairly unpredictable voting patterns from election to election.
    • For New Hampshire to become a Democratic trifecta, the New Hampshire House of Representatives and the governor's office would have to stay Democratic and the New Hampshire State Senate would have to swing Democratic. The Republicans hold a 12-11 majority in the state Senate with one vacancy and all 24 seats up for election in 2014.
    • For a Republican trifecta, the Republicans would need to flip the governorship and state house control while retaining the state Senate.
  • Washington: For Washington to become a trifecta, the Washington House of Representatives and governor's office would have to stay Democratic and the Washington State Senate would have to swing Democratic. There is no gubernatorial election in 2014, so trifecta status depends on the outcome of state Senate elections. Democrats officially hold a 25-24 majority heading into the election; however, two Democratic members gave Republicans effective control over the Senate by joining the Majority Coalition Caucus following the 2012 election.

Possible trifecta losses

Ballotpedia has identified 12 trifecta states that could become divided governments.

  • Republican Party 6 Republican trifectas
  • Democratic Party 6 Democratic trifectas

In the table below, a "Yes" indicates that party control could change while a "No" indicates races that have not been deemed likely to change hands.

State Positions that could change hands Pre-election party in power Post-election party in power
Governor Senate House
Arizona Yes Yes No Republican
Colorado No Yes No Democratic
Connecticut Yes No No Democratic
Florida Yes No No Republican
Kansas Yes No No Republican
Maryland Yes No No Democratic
Massachusetts Yes No No Democratic
Michigan Yes No Yes Republican
New York No Yes No Democratic
Pennsylvania Yes Yes Yes Republican
West Virginia No No Yes Democratic
Wisconsin Yes Yes No Republican
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014.

State legislatures

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How many state legislative chambers will change hands?

See also: State legislative elections, 2014 and State legislative battleground chambers, 2014

Heading into the 2014 elections, Republicans hold a majority of state legislative chambers. Fifty-eight chambers, 29 state senates and 29 state houses, are under Republican control. Democrats have majorities in 40 chambers, 20 state senates and 20 state houses. Although technically nonpartisan, the Nebraska State Senate is controlled by a Republican majority.[2]

The following table details partisan balance in all 99 chambers.

Partisan Balance of All 99 Chambers Before and After 2014 Elections
Pre-election Post-election
Legislative Chamber Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent
State senates 20 29 0 1 - - - -
State houses 20 29 0 0 - - - -
Total: 40 58 0 1 - - - -
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014.
  • We are covering 6,057 races in 46 states holding state legislative elections; for comprehensive coverage of all of those elections visit this page.
  • We have identified 20 battleground chambers. Within those chambers, there are a handful of races that will ultimately determine partisan control.
  • Specific districts have been chosen based on local news reports as well as data on margin of victory in 2012 elections.

Note: The table below will be updated in real-time on election night. As races are called, we will continually update the partisan count totals.

Legislatures
Dem. 4
Rep. 8
Ind. 0
TOTAL 12
UNDECIDED 87
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014. Full coverage

The 20 chambers in 17 states that made Ballotpedia's list are:

For more details and specifics with race-by-race tracking in state legislatures, visit this page. Or, click one of the states below to navigate to that section.

State executives

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Ballotpedia is covering elections for 225 state executive seats in 43 states. The following charts will track results for hotly contested races for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and secretary of state. There are also sections devoted to specialized tracking based on major political trends, including, the 2010 wave election and Obamacare. Our analysis starts by looking at the partisan compositions of these four offices, which will be updated as elections are called.

Note: The table below will be updated in real-time on election night. As races are called, we will continually update the partisan count totals.

Governors
Dem. 7
Rep. 7
Ind. 0
TOTAL 14
UNDECIDED 36
Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014. Full coverage


Partisan Breakdown: Governors
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 21 7
     Republican Party 29 7
     Undecided 0 36
Total 50 50


Partisan Breakdown: Lieutenant Governors
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 16 4
     Republican Party 27 9
     Undecided 0 30
Total 43 43


Partisan Breakdown: Attorneys General
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 26 12
     Republican Party 24 7
     Undecided 0 31
Total 50 50


Partisan Breakdown: Secretaries of State
Party As of October 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 20 11
     Republican Party 26 9
     Nonpartisan 1 1
     Undecided 0 26
Total 47 47

Priority races

The following races have been identified by Ballotpedia staff as the most competitive and interesting state executive elections in 2014.

State Before After
Incumbent Party Winner Winner Party Office Party Change?
Alaska gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Sean Parnell/Mead Treadwell Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Arizona gubernatorial Jan Brewer Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Arkansas gubernatorial Mike Beebe Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Colorado Attorney General John W. Suthers Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Colorado gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial John Hickenlooper/Joseph Garcia Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Florida gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Rick Scott/Carlos Lopez-Cantera Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Georgia gubernatorial Nathan Deal Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Illinois gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Pat Quinn/Sheila Simon Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Kansas gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Sam Brownback/Jeff Colyer Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Maine gubernatorial Paul LePage Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Massachusetts gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Deval Patrick/Vacant Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Michigan attorney general Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Michigan gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Rick Snyder/Brian Calley Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Nebraska gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Dave Heineman/John Nelson Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Nevada lt. gubernatorial Brian Krolicki Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Pennsylvania gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Tom Corbett/Jim Cawley Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
South Carolina gubernatorial Nikki Haley Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wisconsin gubernatorial/lt. gubernatorial Scott Walker/Rebecca Kleefisch Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wisconsin Secretary of State Doug La Follette Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending

What will happen to the Governors elected in the 2010 tea party wave?

Twelve Republican challengers replaced Democratic governors during the 2010 midterm elections. All of these first-term governors are seeking re-election in 2014 with hopes of continuing the conservative wave that swept them into office four years earlier. The following table tracks the outcomes of these re-election bids.

Re-election outcomes: 2010 GOP governors
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Florida Rick Scott Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Iowa Terry E. Branstad Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Kansas Sam Brownback Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Maine Paul LePage Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Michigan Rick Snyder Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
New Mexico Susana Martinez Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Ohio John Kasich Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Oklahoma Mary Fallin Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Pennsylvania Tom Corbett Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Tennessee Bill Haslam Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wisconsin Scott Walker Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wyoming Matt Mead Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending

States with Obamacare lawsuits

Attorneys general in 27 states filed lawsuits in 2010 and 2011 challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Two-thirds (18) of those attorney general seats are up for election in 2014. The following table tracks partisan control over these attorney general offices before and after the 2014 election.[3]

Note: Catherine Cortez Masto (D) refused to file a lawsuit against the federal government in 2010, leading then-Gov. Jim Gibbons (R) to appoint attorney Mark Hutchison to sue the government on the state's behalf.[4]

States involved in Obamacare lawsuits
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Alabama Luther Strange Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Arizona Tom Horne Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Colorado John W. Suthers Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Florida Pam Bondi Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Georgia Samuel S. Olens Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Idaho Lawrence Wasden Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Kansas Derek Schmidt Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Michigan Bill Schuette Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Nebraska Jon Bruning Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Nevada Catherine Cortez Masto Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
North Dakota Wayne Stenehjem Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Ohio Mike DeWine Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Oklahoma Scott Pruitt Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
South Carolina Alan Wilson Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
South Dakota Marty J. Jackley Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Texas Greg Abbott Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Utah Sean Reyes Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Wisconsin J.B. Van Hollen Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending

Targeted secretary of state races

Competing political action committees (PACs) emerged in 2014 to exert influence in secretary of state elections across the country. SOS for Democracy and SOS for SOS worked to secure these offices for liberal and conservative interests, respectively. The following table tracks the election outcomes for six races targeted by both SOS for Democracy and SOS for SOS in 2014.[5][6]

Targeted Secretaries of State
State Incumbent Party Winner Party Office party change?
Arizona Ken Bennett Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Colorado Scott Gessler Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Iowa Matt Schultz Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Michigan Ruth Johnson Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
New Mexico Dianna Duran Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Ohio Jon Husted Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending

Ballot measures

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Special reports

Check out Policypedia articles about statewide ballot measures in the following policy areas.

Energy
Education
Elections
Taxes

What statewide ballot measures are approved?

See also: 2014 statewide ballot measure election results and 2014 ballot measures

Voters will be weighing in on some of the nation's most contentious topics during tonight's elections, making this election cycle one of the most significant in recent history. Decisions made at the ballot box will establish important precedents and set the tone for future elections. Below are the statewide measures Ballotpedia identified as the most important, high-profile and divisive of 2014. These measures were selected based on the issues addressed, the amount of money spent on them, the volume of media attention focused on each, and the likelihood that the outcomes of these measures will affect future ballot measure elections. The chart below will be updated throughout election night as results come in.

Topics on the ballot:

Ballot Measure Outcome Yes No Precincts Reporting Topic
Alaska Marijuana Legalization, Ballot Measure 2 (2014) (%) (%) Marijuana


California Proposition 45, Public Notice Required for Insurance Company Rates Initiative (2014) (%) (%) Insurance


California Proposition 46, Medical Malpractice Lawsuits Cap and Drug Testing of Doctors (2014) (%) (%) Healthcare
Colorado Mandatory Labeling of GMOs Initiative, Proposition 105 (2014) (%) (%) Business regulation


Florida Right to Medical Marijuana Initiative, Amendment 2 (2014) (%) (%) Marijuana


Missouri Teacher Performance Evaluation, Amendment 3 (2014) (%) (%) Labor


Nevada Margin Tax for Public Schools Initiative, Question 3 (2014) (%) (%) Taxes


Oregon Legalized Marijuana Initiative, Measure 91 (2014) (%) (%) Marijuana


Oregon Mandatory Labeling of GMOs Initiative, Measure 92 (2014) (%) (%) Business regulation


Tennessee Legislative Powers Regarding Abortion, Amendment 1 (2014) (%) (%) Abortion


Washington Class Size Reduction Measure, Initiative 1351 (2014) (%) (%) Education


Washington Gun Rights Measure, Initiative 591 (2014) (%) (%) Firearms


Washington Universal Background Checks for Gun Purchases, Initiative 594 (2014) (%) (%) Firearms



What local ballot measures are approved?

See also: 2014 local ballot measure election results and Local ballot measure elections in 2014

Voters will cast ballots on thousands of local measures on November 4. The chart below captures some of the most notable local ballot measures across the nation, including those addressing topics like marijuana, GMOs, fracking, business taxes and the minimum wage. The chart will be updated on this page once specific races have been called.

For more details about real-time updates for the notable local ballot measures in the table, see this page.

In the table below there are 60 notable measures. Topics addressed include:

Ballot Measure Outcome Yes No Total Votes Topic
Alachua County Citizens United Advisory Referendum: "Corporations are not People, Money is not Speech" (November 2014) (%) (%) Definition of a corporation
Bernalillo County Marijuana Decriminalization Advisory Question, Measure 1 (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Butte County Medical Marijuana Initiative, Measure B (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Butte County Medical Marijuana Ordinance 4075 Referendum, Measure A (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Cañon City Marijuana Retail Legalization, Measure 2C (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Anchorage Ordinance 37 "Responsible Labor Act" Veto Referendum (November 2014) (%) (%) Labor and unions
City of Appleton $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of Athens Fracking Ban Initiative, Issue 7 (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
City of Berkeley Redistricting Map Referendum, Measure S (November 2014) (%) (%) Incorporation, merging and boundaries of local jurisdictions
City of Berkeley Sugary Beverages and Soda Tax Question, Measure D (November 2014) (%) (%) Business tax
City of Berkley Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Clare Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Denton Fracking Ban Initiative (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
City of Encinitas Medical Marijuana Initiative, Proposition F (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Eureka "Fair Wage Act" Minimum Wage Initiative, Measure R (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of Frankfort Marijuana Legalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Harrison Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Huntington Woods Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Lapeer Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Lewiston Recreational Marijuana Legalization Measure (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Manitou Springs Retail Marijuana Ban, Measure 2G (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Menasha $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of Mount Pleasant Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Neenah $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of Oakland Minimum Wage Increase Initiative, Measure FF (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of Onaway Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Pleasant Ridge Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Port Huron Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Rancho Santa Margarita Former Nissan Dealership Zone Change, Measure Z (November 2014) (%) (%) Zoning, land use and development
City of Sacramento "Strong Mayor" Mayor-Council Form of Government Charter Amendment, Measure L (November 2014) (%) (%) Charter amendments
City of Saginaw Marijuana Decriminalization Proposal (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of San Francisco Minimum Wage Increase Referred Measure, Proposition J (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
City of San Francisco Sugary Drink Tax, Proposition E (November 2014) (%) (%) Business tax
City of Santa Ana Council-Referred Medical Marijuana Regulation Ordinance, Measure BB (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Santa Ana Medical Cannabis Restriction and Limitation Initiative, Measure CC (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Santa Monica Airport Development Council-Referred Question, Measure LC (November 2014) (%) (%) Zoning, land use and development
City of Santa Monica Voter Approval of Airport Development Initiative, Measure D (November 2014) (%) (%) Charter amendments
City of South Portland Recreational Marijuana Legalization Measure (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
City of Wichita Sales Tax Measure (November 2014) (%) (%) Sales tax
Dane County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
Eau Claire County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
Humboldt County "Genetic Contamination Prevention Ordinance" GMO Ban Initiative, Measure P (November 2014) (%) (%) GMO
Kenosha County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
Lake County "Freedom to Garden Human Rights Restoration Act" Initiative, Measure P (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Lake County "Medical Marijuana Control Act" Initiative, Measure O (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Maui County Genetically Modified Organism Moratorium Initiative (November 2014) (%) (%) GMO
Mendocino County Community Bill of Rights Fracking and Water Use Initiative, Measure S (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
Milwaukee County $10.10 Per Hour State Minimum Wage Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Minimum wage
San Benito County Fracking Ban Initiative, Measure J (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
Santa Barbara County Fracking Ban Initiative, Measure P (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
Santa Fe County Marijuana Decriminalization Advisory Question (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Shasta County Outdoor Medical Marijuana Ordinance Referendum, Measure A (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Lakewood Marijuana Retail Ban, Measure 2A (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Palisade Retail Marijuana Legalization, Measure 2A (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Palmer Lake Marijuana Retail Legalization & Taxation, Measure 300 (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Palmer Lake Recreational Marijuana Retail Ban, Measure 301 (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Paonia Marijuana Retail Legalization Referendum (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Ramah Marijuana Retail Legalization, Measure 2B (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Town of Red Cliff Marijuana Retail Ban, Question 2G (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Village of Gates Mills "Community Bill of Rights" Fracking Ban, Issue 51 (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking
Washington D.C. Marijuana Legalization, Initiative 71 (November 2014) (%) (%) Marijuana
Youngstown "Community Bill of Rights" Frack Ban, Issue 4 (November 2014) (%) (%) Fracking

State courts

Check out Judgepedia's election night coverage for further details about judicial races across the country.

What happens to state supreme courts and the balance of power

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2014 Elections:
What's at Stake?

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United States SenateUnited States HouseTrifectas and state government controlState legislaturesState executivesBallot measuresState courtsSchool boardsMunicipal elections

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Judgepedia's extensive coverage of state judicial races this year includes some notable state supreme court races. While Michigan's high court is the only one with the potential to change partisan control (in this case, from a Republican to a Democratic majority), the stakes--and price tags--for the other races listed below are high as well. A few things we're watching for on November 4, 2014:

A total of 32 states have held or will hold elections for their courts of last resort in 2014. Many candidates are unopposed or are facing a retention election. In fact, only eight states have one or more contested supreme court races on their November ballot. The most competitive of these are included below. For more information on these races see here.

Michigan Supreme Court races

Though Michigan's elections are technically nonpartisan, candidates are nominated by party committees. Currently, the Michigan Supreme Court has five Republicans and two Democrats on its bench. One Democratic seat and two Republican seats are up for election this year. The partisan balance of the court could flip, but Democrats would need to win all three seats. This is the only state supreme court in 2014 where a partisan flip is possible. Alternately, the retirement of Justice Michael Cavanagh, a Democrat, opens up the possibility for Republicans to gain another seat.


8-year term (2 seats)
Candidate Vote %
Brian Zahra Republican Party
James Robert Redford Republican Party
Richard Bernstein Democratic Party
William B. Murphy Democratic Party
Doug Dern Independent
Current justices Michael Cavanagh
Brian Zahra


2-year term
Candidate Vote %
David Viviano Republican Party
Deborah Thomas Democratic Party
Kerry L. Morgan Independent
Current justice David Viviano

North Carolina Supreme Court races

North Carolina's judicial elections are technically nonpartisan. However, it is a state where the justices' political affiliations are clearly known and political parties may publicly endorse candidates. Currently, the Supreme Court of North Carolina has five Republicans and two Democrats on its bench. In 2014 four seats are up for election, meaning that a majority of the seven-member court is up for grabs.

Three Democratic seats and one Republican seat were initially up for election this year. Two of those seats--the chief justice position and Justice Martin's open seat--were given new, Republican incumbents thanks to appointments by Governor Pat McCrory in August 2014. That resulted in the chief justice position changing from a Democratic incumbent (Sarah Parker, who retired) to a Republican incumbent (Mark Martin, who is running for a full term in 2014). Thus, for the November elections, two open seats are occupied by Republicans and two by Democrats.

A partisan flip is not possible, even though a majority of the court's seats are up for election, because it would require Democrats to win all four seats and there are no Democrats in the race for chief justice. Republicans, on the other hand, have a chance to monopolize the court if they can oust Justices Cheri Beasley and Robin Hudson.


Chief Justice seat
Candidate Vote %
Mark Martin Republican Party
Ola M. Lewis Republican Party
Current justice Sarah Parker


Martin seat
Candidate Vote %
Robert N. Hunter, Jr. Republican Party
Sam Ervin Democratic Party
Current justice Mark Martin (Robert Hunter temporarily appointed)


Beasley seat
Candidate Vote %
Cheri Beasley Democratic Party
Michael L. Robinson Republican Party
Current justice Cheri Beasley


Hudson seat
Candidate Vote %
Robin Hudson Democratic Party
Eric L. Levinson Republican Party
Current justice Robin Hudson

Ohio Supreme Court races

Though Ohio holds nonpartisan general elections, its primaries are partisan, so the political affiliations of the judicial candidates are commonly known. Currently, the Ohio Supreme Court has six Republicans and one Democrat on its bench. Two Republican seats are up for election this year. It could be a chance for Democrats to obtain a slightly larger presence on the court, but they will face an uphill battle due to the incumbency of both Republican candidates, which tends to offer a distinct advantage, especially in a state that is already dominated by Republicans.


French seat
Candidate Vote %
Judith French Republican Party
John P. O'Donnell Democratic Party
Current justice Judith French


Kennedy seat
Candidate Vote %
Sharon L. Kennedy Republican Party
Tom Letson Democratic Party
Current justice Sharon L. Kennedy

Texas Supreme Court races

Currently, the Texas Supreme Court has nine Republicans and no Democrats on its bench. Four Republican justices are seeking re-election in 2014. Any Democratic victory would be a unique outcome for this court.

In the race for Place 6, Justice Jeff Brown is challenged by a judge of the state's other high court, Lawrence Meyers. Meyers has served on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals since 1992. He was also a Republican for his entire judicial career, but chose to run as a Democrat in this election.

Both incumbents in the races below had received hundreds of thousands of dollars more campaign contributions than their opponents, as of the latest reports.


Brown seat (Place 6)
Candidate Vote %
Jeff Brown Republican Party
Lawrence Meyers Democratic Party
Mark Ash Independent
Current justice Jeff Brown


Boyd seat (Place 6)
Candidate Vote %
Jeff Boyd Republican Party
Gina Benavides Democratic Party
Don Fulton Independent
Charles E. Waterbury Independent
Current justice Jeff Boyd

Texas Court of Criminal Appeals race

Although retirements put three races without incumbents on the 2014 ballot for this court, the only race with both a Republican and Democratic candidate in the general election is the race for Place 3. Republican Bert Richardson has dominated the fundraising for this race.

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has eight Republicans and one Democrat on its bench. However, Judge Lawrence Meyers only recently switched from the Republican to the Democratic party, so the GOP, in reality, has held a monopoly on the court. Thus, a victory for Democrat John Granberg would be a change of pace for this court's elections.


Price seat (Place 3)
Candidate Vote %
Bert Richardson Republican Party
John Granberg Democratic Party
Current justice Tom Price

Montana Supreme Court race

Justice Mike Wheat is running for re-election and was almost unopposed due to a question of challenger Lawrence VanDyke's eligibility earlier in the year. That was sorted out and the state supreme court ruled that VanDyke could compete. This is now a race to watch because VanDyke is supported by the Republican State Leadership Committee, a national conservative group with its hands in a number of key judicial races this year. In a state that mandates nonpartisan judicial elections, partisan undertones have crept in and both candidates have raised significant sums of money.


Wheat seat (Seat 2)
Candidate Vote %
Mike Wheat
Lawrence VanDyke
Current justice Mike Wheat

School boards

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2014 Elections:
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See also: School board elections, 2014

For comprehensive coverage of all the school board elections occurring in the nation's largest school districts, visit our school board elections page.

We have selected the following races for more extensive coverage due to a variety of factors. Several of these elections are in districts with more than 100,000 students enrolled, some feature especially contentious issues at stake such as Common Core, charter schools and teacher merit pay, and some could result in a change of the board's leadership and governing majority.

2014 School Board Elections
District State Seats up for election Total board seats Winners
Ann Arbor Public Schools Michigan 4 7
Antioch Unified School District California 2 5
Chandler Unified School District Arizona 2 5
Clark County School District Nevada 3 7
Gilbert Public Schools Arizona 2 5
Gwinnett County Public Schools Georgia 2 5
Howard County Public Schools Maryland 4 7
Indianapolis Public Schools Indiana 3 7
Jefferson County Public Schools Kentucky 4 7
Jefferson Parish Public Schools Louisiana 9 9
Jersey City Public Schools New Jersey 3 9
Mobile County Public School System Alabama 2 5
Montgomery County Public Schools Maryland 4 7
Omaha Public Schools Nebraska 4 9
Prince George's County Public Schools Maryland 4 9
Rialto Unified School District California 2 5
San Diego Unified School District California 2 5
Santa Clara Unified School District California 4 7
Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District California 4 7
Sweetwater Union High School District California 5 5
Toms River Regional Schools New Jersey 3 9
Tucson Unified School District Arizona 2 5
Vernon Parish School District Louisiana 12 12
Washoe County School District Nevada 3 7
West Contra Costa Unified School District California 3 5

Municipal elections

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See also: United States municipal elections, 2014

There are 108 seats up for election in the largest 100 cities on November 4. Thirteen of the largest 100 cities are holding elections for mayor, while 25 cities are holding city council elections. The four cities with the most intriguing races are:

Note: Last updated: 11:44 am October 29, 2014.

Washington, D.C. municipal elections, 2014

Washington, D.C. will be electing a new mayor this year after Muriel Bowser (D) defeated incumbent Vincent Gray (D) in the Democratic primary. Polling in late September put Bowser eight points ahead of City Councilman David Catania (I). Hot-button issues in this race include public transportation, cost of living, school reform and marijuana.

Washington, D.C. Mayoral Election, 2014
Candidate Party Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Muriel Bowser Democratic Party
Faith Green Party
Bruce Majors Libertarian Party
David Catania Independent
Nestor Djonkam Independent
Carol Schwartz Independent

San Diego, California municipal elections, 2014

San Diego has a crucial race in District 6 this year. Although both candidates are officially nonpartisan, Carol Kim is endorsed by the San Diego County Democratic Party and Chris Cate is endorsed by current mayor Kevin Faulconer (R). On the current council, Democratic-affiliated members hold a 6-3 majority and are able to veto Faulconer's policies. Should Cate win this seat, that would revert to a 5-4 majority that holds no veto power. Polling in September put Cate 11 points ahead of Kim. For more information on the council majority situation, click here.

San Diego, California City Council Elections, 2014
Candidate Affiliation Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Chris Cate Republican Party
Carol Kim Democratic Party

Oakland, California municipal elections, 2014

See also: Ranked-choice voting

The mayoral election in Oakland, California may be a source of intense drama. In 2010, Jean Quan gained enough votes in the final round of voting to leapfrog Don Perata, who had led the entire vote counting process, to win the mayor's seat. Oakland uses a system called ranked-choice voting that allows voters to select up to three candidates in order of preference and transfers their votes as candidates are defeated. Polling in September put city councilwoman and 2010 third-place candidate Rebecca Kaplan 12 points ahead of Quan, but due to how votes are transferred during the election that margin might mean little.

Oakland, California Mayoral Election, 2014
Candidate First Preference Votes Vote % Total Votes Vote % 2014 Winner
Jason "Shake" Anderson
Peter Yuan Liu
Patrick K. McCullough
Bryan Parker
Jean Quan - Incumbent
Courtney Ruby
Saied Karamooz
Elizabeth "Libby" Schaaf
Nancy Sidebotham
Dan Siegel
Joseph Tuman
Charles Ray Williams
Ken Houston
Rebecca Kaplan
Eric Wilson

Austin, Texas municipal elections, 2014

The city of Austin, Texas is holding elections for the first time under new rules passed in November 2012. These changes included creating four new city council seats, establishing ten districts by which individual council members are elected, and imposing term limits of three, three-year terms. Previously, the six council members were all elected at-large without term limits. These new rules left only two incumbents, Chris Riley and Kathryne Beth Tovo, eligible to run. As both are running in District 9, this means Austin will elect a new mayor and nine new city council members.

Austin, Texas Municipal Elections, 2014
Seat Total Votes Vote % Runoff? Winner(s)
Mayor
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
District 6
District 7
District 8
District 9
District 10

See also

References