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Fines placed upon Alaska Ballot Measure 1 supporters

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August 13, 2010

JUNEAU, Alaska: Alaska's Ballot Measure 1 is set to appear on the August 24, 2010 primary election ballot with no main campaign for the measure. The main group who had been campaigning for the measure, Clean Team Alaska, ceased their campaigning after the measure's ballot language was altered, but that hasn't stopped the state from placing fines on the group for not filing its 30-day spending report.[1]

On August 12, 2010, Clean Team Alaska was fined $90 for its violation, but Alaskans for Open Government, who had reportedly donated thousands of dollars into the campaign run by Clean Team Alaska, was slapped with a $339,000 for not filing its report on time. The report was filed months after the deadline. According to Ken Jacobus, member of Alaskans for Open Government, "Because we didn't think we had to file and filing is a bunch of work, I didn't file. And once someone raised a question about it whether we should file or not, I filed."

The measure's supporters dropped their campaign efforts, stating that the Lieutenant Governor of Alaska's changes to the ballot language gave an unfair advantage to those who want to reject the measure. Initiative organizers will not take their argument to court, citing corruption in the judicial system.

According to Clean Team Alaska committee chairman Dick Randolph, "The current attorney general and lieutenant governor are clearly not acting within the law, and the only course of action we have is a lengthy and costly legal fight with very little expectation of a favorable ruling from a court system that embraces the same culture of corruption as the attorney general and lieutenant governor." Josh Applebee, campaign manager for the group opposed to the initiative, Stop the Gag Law, stated, "Their decision doesn't change our track. It's still going to be on the ballot. It's still a bad initiative. We're still going to be educating people about the fact it's a bad initiative."[2]

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