Five years since Kansas saw a constitutional amendment on ballot

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June 9, 2010

TOPEKA, Kansas: It has been five years since residents in Kansas got to vote on a proposed constitutional amendment in the general election, according to Ballotpedia's database of Kansas ballot measures and the Kansas Secretary of State's Elections page. The measure that voters decided on that year, 2005, was a marriage question that asked voters whether or not to define marriage as "a civil contract between two persons who are of opposite sex and declares all other marriages to be contrary to public policy and void." The measure was approved with a vote of 417,675 (70%) to 179,432 (30%)

This year, Kansans will vote on two legislatively-referred constitutional amendments in the November 2, 2010 general election ballot. One question will ask voters to change the constitution to allow the right to bear arms in the state of Kansas for lawful purposes. The second measure would ask voters to eliminate mental illness as a voting disqualification. At least four measures had been proposed in the Kansas Legislature, but legislative session ended on May 28, 2010 before any those measure could make it onto the ballot.

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