Georgia's 10th Congressional District

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Georgia's 10th Congressional District
Georgia's 10th.JPG
Current incumbentPaul Broun Republican Party
Population694,613
Gender49.3% Male, 50.7% Female
Race69.1% White, 24.5% Black, 2.2% Asian, 0.3% Native American
Ethnicity5.2% Hispanic
Unemployment11.1%
Median household income$45,314
High school graduation rate83.5%
College graduation rate23%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 10th Congressional District of Georgia is a congressional district in Georgia.

Georgia's 10th Congressional District is located in the northeastern part of the state. The district includes the cities of Athens, Evans, Augusta, Watkinsville and Toccoa.[1]

The current representative of the 10th Congressional District is Paul Broun (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Georgia's 10th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 10th Congressional District of Georgia will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Georgia's 10th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 10th Congressional District of Georgia held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Paul Broun won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Georgia District 10 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul Broun Incumbent 100% 211,065
Total Votes 211,065
Source: Georgia Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Paul C. Broun won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Russell Edwards (D) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Georgia District 10 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul C. Broun incumbent 67.4% 138,062
     Democratic Russell Edwards 32.6% 66,905
Total Votes 204,967

2008
On November 4, 2008, Paul C. Broun won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bobby Saxon (D) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Georgia District 10 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPaul C. Broun incumbent 60.7% 177,265
     Democratic Bobby Saxon 39.3% 114,638
Total Votes 291,903

2006
On November 7, 2006, Charlie Norwood won election to the United States House. He defeated Terry Holley (D) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Georgia District 10 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngCharlie Norwood 67.4% 117,721
     Democratic Terry Holley 32.6% 57,032
Total Votes 174,753

2004
Nathan Deal (R) ran unopposed for re-election in 2004.

2002
Nathan Deal (R) ran unopposed for election in 2002.

2000
On November 7, 2000, Charlie Norwood won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Denise Freeman (D) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Georgia District 10 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngCharlie Norwood incumbent 63.2% 122,590
     Democratic Denise Freeman 36.8% 71,309
Total Votes 193,899

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 10th Congressional District of Georgia after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Georgia

In 2011, the Georgia State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

On August 22, 2011, Georgia's Republican leadership released their proposed Congressional redistricting map. Due to population growth, Georgia gained a 14th Congressional district following the 2010 census. The new district, according to the plan, is located in the northwestern part of the state.[7] Rep. Tom Graves (R) was drawn into the new district, which left 9th District seat open in 2012. After redistricting, the 9th District leaned Republican.[7] In addition, the plan displaced Rep. John Barrow (D), but Barrow (who had been displaced before) moved into the district in order to remain in the 12th District.[7] Rep. Sanford Bishop's (D) district will become a majority-minority district. Also, Rep. Phil Gingrey's (R) 11th District picked up part of Atlanta. Overall, the plan was expected to bolster the Republican majority in the state's congressional delegation.[7]

External links

See also

References