Gerald Malloy

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Gerald Malloy
Gerald malloy.jpg
South Carolina State Senate District 29
Incumbent
In office
2002-Present
Term ends
November 14, 2016
Years in position 12
PartyDemocratic
Compensation
Base salary$10,400/year
Per diem$140/day
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 6, 2012
First elected2002
Next generalNovember 8, 2016
Term limitsN/A
Education
J.D.University of South Carolina, 1988
Personal
BirthdayOctober 26, 1961
Place of birthChesterfield County, SC
ProfessionAttorney
ReligionBaptist
Websites
Office website
CandidateVerification
Gerald Malloy (b. October 26, 1961) is a Democratic member of the South Carolina State Senate, representing District 29. He was first elected to the chamber in a special election in 2002.

Biography

Malloy earned his B.S. from the University of South Carolina in 1984. He then earned his J.D. in 1988.

Malloy is a Player Representative for the National Football Association and the National Basketball Association. He is currently an attorney.

Committee assignments

2013-2014

At the beginning of the 2013 legislative session, Malloy served on the following committees:

South Carolina Committee Assignments, 2013
Banking and Insurance
Education
Invitations
Judiciary
Rules
Transportation

2011-2012

In the 2011-2012 legislative session, Malloy served on the following committees:

2009-2010

In the 2009-2010 legislative session, Malloy served on the following committees:

Elections

2012

See also: South Carolina State Senate elections, 2012

Malloy ran unopposed in the Democratic primary on June 12 and in the general election on November 6, 2012.[1][2]

South Carolina State Senate, District 29, General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGerald Malloy Incumbent 98.5% 30,472
     Other Write-Ins 1.5% 451
Total Votes 30,923

2008

See also: South Carolina State Senate elections, 2008

Malloy won re-election for District 29 of the South Carolina State Senate with 26,257 votes, ahead of write-ins (208).[3]

He raised $156,243 for his campaign.[4]

South Carolina State Senate, District 29
Candidates Votes
Green check mark transparent.png Gerald Malloy (D) 26,257
Write-ins 208

Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Malloy is available dating back to 2004. Based on available campaign finance records, Malloy raised a total of $587,711 during that time period. This information was last updated on June 21, 2013.[5]

Gerald Malloy's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 South Carolina State Senate, District 29 Won $58,431
2010 South Carolina State Senate, District 29 Not up for election $51,542
2008 South Carolina State Senate, District 29 Won $156,243
2006 South Carolina State Senate, District 29 Not up for election $105,716
2004 South Carolina State Senate, District 29 Won $215,779
Grand Total Raised $587,711

2012

Malloy won re-election to the South Carolina State Senate in 2012. During that election cycle, Malloy raised a total of $58,431.
South Carolina State Senate 2012 election - Campaign Contributions
Top contributors to Gerald Malloy's campaign in 2012
Richardson, Gail N$1,000
South Carolina Orthopaedic Association$1,000
South Carolina Hospital Association$1,000
A Fund for a Better South Carolina$1,000
Stern, Bill H$1,000
Total Raised in 2012$58,431
Source:Follow the Money

2010

Malloy was not up for election to the South Carolina State Senate in 2010. During that election cycle, Malloy raised a total of $51,542.

2008

Malloy won re-election to the South Carolina State Senate in 2008. During that election cycle, Malloy raised a total of $156,243.

2006

Malloy was not up for election to the South Carolina State Senate in 2006. During that election cycle, Malloy raised a total of $105,716.

2004

Malloy won election to the South Carolina State Senate in 2004. During that election cycle, Malloy raised a total of $215,779.

Scorecards

See also: State legislative scorecards and State legislative scorecards in South Carolina

Legislative scorecards are used to evaluate elected public officials based on voting record. Some scorecards are created by political advocacy groups with a focus on specific issues, while others are developed by newspapers and are broad in scope. Scorecards are meant to be used as a tool for voters to have a quick picture of whether their views align with a particular legislator's record.

Because scorecards can be specific to particular issues or general to a state’s legislative term, for example, each report should be considered on its own merits. Each entity that publishes these reports uses different methodologies and definitions for the terms used.

An overview for scorecards in all 50 states can be found on this page. To contribute to the list of South Carolina scorecards, email suggestions to scorecards@ballotpedia.org.

Please see our writing guidelines if you would like to add results from an individual scorecard to this legislator's profile.

2013-2014

The South Carolina State Legislature was in its 120th legislative session from January 8, 2013, to June 6, 2014. In 2014, a statewide session was held from June 17 to June 19 "for the consideration of certain specified matters."[6]

  • Legislators are scored on business issues, including: infrastructure funding, the Department of Employment and Workforce Integrity bill, expanding 4-year-old kindergarten and funding for the Manufacturing Skills Standard Council.
  • Environment North Carolina, a statewide, citizen-based environmental advocacy organization, monitors the voting records of North Carolina’s state legislators on key environmental issues.
  • The scorecards are not comprehensive, but concentrate on issues related to jobs, spending, and freedom.
  • Legislators are scored on efforts to promote economic freedom, lower taxes, create an efficient and accountable state government, reduce spending, protect small businesses and reform the state's pension system.

2011-2012

The South Carolina State Legislature was in its 119th legislative session from January 11, 2011, to June 7, 2012. On June 2, 2011, Governor Nikki Haley attempted to call the Legislature into an "emergency" special session to begin on June 7 to create the new South Carolina Department of Administration. A lawsuit was filed by Senate President Pro Tem Glenn McConnell, in which he contended that Haley's call for a special session was unconstitutional, and that it violated the state Constitution's requirement of separation of powers among the governor, legislature and courts.[7] On June 6, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled 3-2 against Governor Haley, stating that her order violated the Legislature's ability to set its calendar and agenda.[8] The legislature met in a special redistricting session from June 14 - July 1.[9] The legislature re-convened July 26.[10]

  • Legislators are scored on environment and conservation of land efforts.
  • Legislators are scored on medicaid flexibility, economic development, vetoes sustained, and record of votes.
  • Legislators are scored on limited government, the free market, and individual liberty and responsibility.
  • The RLC supports individual rights, limited government and free enterprise.
  • BIPEC uses roll call votes on business and industry issues to calculate a Vote Score for members of South Carolina's state legislature.
  • Legislators are scored on efforts to promote economic freedom, lower taxes, create an efficient and accountable state government, reduce spending, protect small businesses and reform the state's pension system.

The Palmetto Liberty PAC Scorecard

See also: The Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee's Legislative Score Card

The Palmetto Liberty Political Action Committee, a conservative pro-limited government think tank in South Carolina, releases its Scorecard for South Carolina Representatives and Senators once a year. The Scorecard gives each a legislator a score based on how they voted in the two-year legislative term prior to the election on specific issues which the Palametto Liberty PAC thought were anti-limited government. "Most of the votes shown on the score card are votes that we lost. Now we can identify the Legislators that caused us to lose these votes. These Legislators are the ones who need to be replaced if we are to achieve the vision of having the most free state in the nation."[11]

2012

Joel Lourie received a score of 6% in the 2012 score card, ranking 35th out of all 46 South Carolina Senate members.[12] His score was followed by those of Senators John Matthews (6%) and Floyd Nicholson (6%).[13]

Personal

Malloy and his wife, Davita, have four children.

Awards

The South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SCCADVASA) named Malloy as its “Legislator of the Year” on February 10, 2010. Serving as Chair of South Carolina’s Sentencing Reform Commission, Malloy has pushed for reforms to help victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, including DNA Fingerprinting and the Reduction of Recidivism Act.[14]

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See also

External links

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References

Political offices
Preceded by
Edward Saleeby
South Carolina State Senate - District 29
2002–present
Succeeded by
NA